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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreporto19631969ando 



1778 




A N N U A L 
REPORT 

19 6 3 





1963 




HIGHLIGHTS 
OF 1963 



Held first public auction of Tax Title Property. 

Rogers Brook Construction - First Stage River to Main Street completed. 

Established Stabilization Fund - First Deposit $50,000. 
Andover's Workable Program recertified. 

Andover granted $839,000 for Accelerated Sewer Program. 

Camp Olympia and Manning property acquired for Recreational Park. 

Appointed High School Building Committee to plan new facilities. 

Master Drainage Plan developed - Gleason Street Construction completed. 

Voted to participate in Regional Vocational Technical High School. 

Modernization of Main Street lighting with 21,000 lumen mercury vapor lamps. 

Modernization of Elm Square lighting with 60,000 lumen mercury vapor lamps. 

Memorial Hall Library designated as Regional Library Service Center. 

Gas Inspection Service Established. 

Planning Board approved 8 new subdivisions. 



COVER: 

The cover design shows 

views of Phillips Academy 1778 

and Andover High School, 1963. 



^fi-l\Cf 



TOWN OF 



Andom 

ANNUAL 
REPORT 

19 6 3 



UNDER THE TOWN MANAGER 

FORM OF GOVERNMENT 

SINCE 1959 



• 







Locked 
A 55Z 



Shuck 



Town Officers 



James D. Wilson, Chairman 
William Stewart, Secretary 
Philip K. Allen 
Paul W. Cronin 
Robert A. Watters 
B. Allen Rowland * 



MODERATOR 
Charles G. Hatch 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 



TOWN MANAGER 
Thomas E. Duff 

ASSESSORS 



Archibald D. Maclaren, Jr., Chairman 
Selby Groff 
William H. Russell 



TOWN CLERK 
Irving 0. Piper 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
James P. Christie 

TREASURER 
Anna M. Greeley 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Wendell A. Mattheson 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



Fredric S. O'Brien 



TOWN COUNSEL 



Term expires 1964 



David L. Nicoll, Chairman 
Edmond~E. Hammond 
Wendell A. Mattheson 



BOARD OF RETIREMENT 



Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1964 






BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
Thayer S. Warshaw, Chairman 
Sara B. Rowland 

George E. Hill 

Paul I. MacMillan, Director of Public Assistance 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



Elmer S. Ober 
Francis P. Markey-t- 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
(^ Calvin E. Metcalf, Office Manager 
^ Stanley Chlebowski, Supt . of Highways 
" Donald C. Bassett, Supt. of Sewer and Water Dept. 
j Thomas F. X. Flynn, Town Engineer* 
^ John Avery, Acting Town Engineer 



> 



^ 

** ^ 
£ 



Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Milton J. Meyers, Chairman 

Edward I. Erickson, Superintendent and Secretary 
John S. Sullivan 
William A. Doherty 
Vincent P. Davey 
Barbara G. Moody 



VISUAL CONSULTANT 
William V. Emmons, 0. D. 

SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 

John J. McArdle, Jr., M. 



D, 



SCHOOL NURSES 

Ruth E. Westcott, R. N. 

Gertrude A. Stewart, R. N. 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Warren Lewis, Chairman 
Benjamin 0. Chase, Secretary 
William R. Hill 
Joseph L. Walsh 

William A. Doherty, ex officio 

Edward I. Erickson, ex officio 

Thomas E. Duff, ex officio 



Term expires 1964 

Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1966 

DENTAL HYGIENIST 
M. Augusta Breck 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
William F. Tammany 

SCHOOL DENTIST 
Frank E. Himmer, D.M.D. 



C. Lincoln Giles 
Arthur Peatman 
Ernest N. Hall 



BOARD OF HEALTH 
Robert A. Walsh, Chairman 
Fay H. Elliott 
John Wholey, M. D. 

Walter R. Vogt, Gas Inspector, Sanitary and 

Plumbing Inspector 
Harold Rutter, Jr., Alternate Plumbing Inspector 
John J. Broderick, Milk and Health Inspector 
Elizabeth C. Nadeau, R. N., Health Agent and 

Public Health Nurse 



Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1966 

Term expires 1964 

Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



Charles A. Currier, M. D. 



Arthur Peatman 

Kenneth Wade, Assistant 



Alexander Ritchie, Jr. 
Arthur Silva, Assistant 



Richard D. Lindsay, D. V. M 



TOWN PHYSICIAN 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Burton B. Batcheller, Director 
John M. Kemper, Asst. Director 
Alexander Ritchie, Jr., Asst. Director 
Winston Briggs, Asst. Director 
Everett G. Fraim, Asst. Director 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Newton A. Jones, Sealer 



Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1964 



PLANNING BOARD 
Harold T. King, Chairman 
Virginia H. Hammond, Secretary 
John N. Cole, II 
James H. Eaton, III 
James T. Trenholm 

TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
Arthur Reynolds, Chairman 
Cornelia H. Fitts, Secretary 
Leo F. Daley, Treasurer 
Andrew A. Caffrey 
Elinore L. Washburn 
Edward I . Erickson 
Daniel Frishman 



Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1967 
Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1968 



Term expir 
Term expir 
Term expir 
Term expir 
Term expir 
Term expir 
Term expir 



es 1966 
es 1967 
es 1964 
es 1965 
es 1970 
es 1969 
es 1968 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
Rev. Frederick B. Noss 
Rev. J. Edison Pike 
Rev. Bruce VanBlair 
Edmond E. Hammond 
Arthur W. Cole 
Harry Sellars 
C. Carleton Kimball 
Fred W. Doyle 

TRUSTEES OF CORNELL FUND 
Frederick E. Caeever, Treasurer 
Irving J. Whitcomb 
Arthur W. Cole 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1966 



TRUSTEES OF SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 
Frederick E. Cheever, Chairman 
Albert E. Curtis, Secretary 
Malcolm E. Lundgren 
Irving J. Whitcomb 
Edward P. Hall 



Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1966 



Norman Barraclough, Chairman 
Stephen H. Pettit, Secretary 
Kenneth E. Holmes 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Thomas S. Marjerison, Jr. 



Richard I . Anderson 

Robert M. Henderson 

Glenn W. Inman 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Alfred W. Fuller, Chairman 
Edmond E. Hammond, Secretary 
Harold Rutter, Jr. 

Robert S. Zollner, Associate Member 
Sherley M. Sweet, Jr. , Associate Member 
Harris N. Sanfilippo, Associate Member 



Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1964 



Joseph A. McCarthy 
Frank L. Brigham 



PLANNING BOARD OF APPEALS 



Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1964 



Eugene A. Zalla 
Walter F. McDonald 
Harry Sellars 
Irving 0. Piper, Clerk 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1966 



Robert S 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY TOWN BY-LAWS 
Zollner, Chairman 



Term expires 1964 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 



Leslie S. Bartow, Director 
James D. Doherty, Chairman 
Stephen S. Sorota 
Durwood W. Moody 
Walter Pearson 
Donald Sagaser 
Rita K. Leigh 
Virginia H. Cole 



Joseph F. Adams, Chairman 
Robert B. Mclntyre 
John N. Cole, II 
Henry L. Hilton 
Richard W. Brooks 



James D. Hamilton 
Arthur Peatman 
William G. Perry 



John C. Young, Chairman 



Albert R. Retelle, Chairman 
Heinrich Rohrbach 
Christopher Muller 
Juliet R. Kellogg 
John W. Kimball 



Term 


expires 


1964 


Term 


expires 


1964 


Term 


expires 


1964 


Term 


expires 


1964 


Term 


expires 


1965 


Term 


expires 


1966 


Term 


expires 


1966 



LAND ACQUISITION COMMITTEE 



NEW MATERIALS COMMITTEE 

PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 

P. Hayden Clark 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



Henry W. Schereschewsky 



Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1965 
Term expires 1964 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



Charles DeBell, Chairman 

Richard M. Sullivan 

Harold Haller 

John R. McLeod 

David Duncan, Jr. 

Robert Phinney 

Glen Grubbs 

Horace M. Poynter, Jr. 

Wolf Berthold 



Fred S . Tarbox 



REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
David MacDonald, Jr., Chairman 
Harold E. Coleman, Vice Chairman 
Thomas R. Wallace, Treasurer 
Thomas P. Eldred, Asst. Secretary 
Winston A. Blake, Asst. Treasurer 
James E. Manning, Exec. Director and 
ex officio Secretary 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 



Joseph L. Monan 
Cecil W. Garrod 
Albert Cole, Jr 
Alex. Yancy 
John Lynch 



Term 


expires 


1968 


Term 


expires 


1968 


Term 


expires 


1967 


Term 


expires 


1967 


Term 


expires 


1966 


Term 


expires 


1965 


Term 


expires 


1966 


Term 


expires 


1964 


Term 


expires 


1964 



Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1965 

Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1966 
Term expires 1968 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



CENTRAL MERRIMACK VALLEY PLANNING DISTRICT 



Virginia H. Hammond 



SPECIAL COMMISSION FOR INVESTIGATION AND 
STUDY RELATIVE TO CREATION OF A MERRIMACK 
RIVER VALLEY POLLUTION ABATEMENT DISTRICT 
Joseph A. McCarthy, Representative for Town of Andover 



Edward I . Erickson 
Thomas E. Duff 
Richard Moody 



LONG RANGE CAPITAL EXPENDITURE COMMITTEE 



Frederick P. Worthen 



Term expires 1964 



Robert G. McAnern 

Herbert L. Ortstein 

Harry Axelrod 



COMMITTEE FOR NEW EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 
FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL 
Robert B. Mclntyre, Chairman 
Benjamin 0. Chase 
C. Lincoln Giles 

Walter N. Webster 



Cornelia H. Fitts 

Frederick A. Higgins 

William E. Moriarty 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Henry L. Hilton, Chief and Forest Warden 



David L. Nicoll, Chief 
Martin T. Caughey 



Thomas P. Eldred 
Benjamin C. Brown 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



DOG OFFICER 



CONSTABLES 



Term expires 1964 



Term expires 1964 
Term expires 1964 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Population 1960 Census-17134 
Registered Voters 1963 — 9360 




Town Clerk Irving Piper administering oath of 
office to Selectman Robert A. Waters. Looking on 
are I. to r. William Stewart, Secretary, James D. 
Wilson, Chairman, Philip K. Allen and Paul W. 
Cronin. 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS INCLUDING ANDOVER 



SENATORS 



Leverett Saltonstall 
Dover 



Edward M . Kennedy- 
Boston 



FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
Bradford Morse, 466 Beacon St., Lowell 



FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 
John J. Buckley, 10 Mt . Vernon Street, Lawrence 



FOURTH ESSEX SENATORIAL DISTRICT 
James P. Rurak, 34 Margin Street, Haverhill 



FIFTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 
William Longworth, 25 Stevens Street, Methuen 
Arthur Williams, 149 Haverhill Street, Andover 
Albert P. Pettoruto, 153 Berkeley Street, Lawrence 



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 
C. F. Nelson Pratt 
Daniel J. Burke 
Edward H. Cahill 



SELECTIVE SERVICE BOARD 



Joseph A. Horan, Chairman 

Thomas E. Cargill, Sr . , Secretary 

Martin J. Lawlor, Jr. 

Thomas W. Fallon 

James Deyermond 

Salvatore Basile, Govt. Appeal Agent 



200 Chandler Road, Andover 

Boxford Village, Boxford 

39 Highland View Ave., No. Andover 

58 Maple Avenue, Andover 

64 Andover Street, Andover 

15 Chandler Road, Andover 



* Resigned 
+ Retired 



Annual Town Meeting 



MARCH 4, 1963 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, February 7, 1963 and a Supple- 
mental Warrant, signed by the Selectmen, February 23, 1963, the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and assembled 
at the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five and Six, 
viz: The Central Fire Station in Precinct One; the Square and Compass Hall in Pre- 
cinct Two; the Sacred Heart School, Balmoral Street, Shawsheen Village, in Precinct 
Three; the Andover Grange Hall in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, Ballardvale, in 
Precinct Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in Precinct Six, in said 
Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF MARCH, 1963 

at 7:00 o'clock A. M., to act upon the following articles: 

Essex, SS. Andover, March 4, 1963 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time 
and places and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attest- 
ed copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than 
five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publica- 
tion in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven 
days . 

George B. Brown, Constable 



Supplemental Warrant 

Essex, SS. Andover, March 4, 1963 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time 
and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attest- 
ed copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than 
five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publica- 
tion in the Lawrence Eagle-Tribune. Said warrants have been posted and published 
seven days . 

George B. Brown, Constable 

ARTICLE 1. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. The ballot boxes 
were found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at seven o'clock 
A. M. and closed at seven o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 5,689- 
viz : 

Precinct 1 - 1311 Precinct 2 - 818 Precinct 3 - 913 

Precinct 4 - 957 Precinct 5 - 474 Precinct 6 - 1216 







PRECINCTS 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 














MODERATOR - 


FOR ONE YEAR 


1164 


693 


785 


845 


415 


1111 


Charles G. Hatch 


147 


125 


128 


112 


59 


105 

SELECTMEN - ONE 


Blanks 
FOR THREE YEARS 


683 


503 


478 


508 


278 


566 


Paul W. Cronin 


120 


84 


136 


115 


38 


195 


R. Wayne Long 


498 


219 
4 


276 


309 


148 
2 


445 


Kenneth P. Thompson 
Michael Brennan 


10 


8 


23 


25 


8 


10 


Blanks 




439 


604 


696 


S 
329 


CHOOL COMMITTEE - 


ONE FOR THREE YEARS 


868 


999 


Barbara G. Moody 


399 


363 


296 


241 


134 


205 


James F. Sullivan 


44 


16 


13 


20 


11 


12 


Blanks 



5013 
676 



3016 

688 

1895 

6 

84 



3935 

1638 

116 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY - 
ONE FOR FIVE YEARS 



705 322 377 419 186 633 

287 328 250 240 152 214 

231 115 189 186 60 213 

88 53 97 112 76 156 



Winston A. Blake 
Jeremiah J. Davey 
Theodore E. Meinelt, Jr 
Blanks 



2642 

1471 

994 

582 



779 


546 


498 


543 


326 


716 


512 


240 


393 


404 


144 


463 


20 


32 


22 


10 


4 


37 



QUESTION NO. 1 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 



3408 

2156 

125 



1017 


617 


707 


781 


373 


956 


261 


148 


167 


157 


79 


221 


33 


53 


39 


19 


22 


39 



QUESTION NO. 2 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 



4451 

1033 

205 



All the foregoing officers and questions were voted for on one ballot and the 
check lists were used. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 1 



Andover, March 4, 1963 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Harold R. Barcrof t . Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 1311. Number of ballots received 2100 plus 11 absentee bal- 
lots. Number of ballots returned 800. Number of ballots cast 1311. Police officer 
on duty, Hector Pattullo. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 2 



Joseph W. McNally, Clerk 
Andover, March 4, 1963 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Fernand J. Lussier. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 819. (Machine jumped one). Number of ballots received 1375 
Number of ballots returned 560. Number of ballots cast 818, including 3 absentee 
ballots. Police officer on duty, William Stewart. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 



James M. Gorrie, Jr 



Clerk 



10 



— REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 3 



Andover, March 4, 1963 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, A. Norman Warhurst. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 916 (box jumped three). Number of ballots received 1800 
plus 12 absentee ballots. Number of ballots returned 887. Number of ballots cast 
913. Police officers on duty--Duncan Cairnie and James Lynch. Counted ballots at 
7:00 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 4 



Alan F. Dunlop, Clerk 



Andover, March 4, 1963 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, James D. Doherty. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 958 (jumped one). Number of ballots received 1800. Number of 
ballots returned 957. Police officer on duty, Roy A. Russell. Counted ballots at 
7:00 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 5 



Russell C. MacLeish, Clerk 
Andover, March 4, 1963 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Eugene A. Zalla. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 474. Number of ballots received 800. Number of ballots returned 
326. Number of ballots cast 474. Police officer on duty, Richard 0. Aumais . 
Counted ballots at 7:01 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 6 



Lionel F. Buckley, Clerk 
Andover, March 4, 1963 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Charles E. Piatt. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 1209 plus 7 absentee ballots. Number of ballots received 2100. 
Number of ballots returned 891. Number of ballots cast 1209. Police officer on 
duty, Robert V. Deyermond. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 

Edward A. Doyle, Clerk 

After final action of Article One , the said meeting was adjourned by virtue of 
Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Saturday, March 9, 1963, at 9:30 
o'clock A. M. at the Memorial Auditorium. 



11 



Adjourned Town Meeting 



MARCH 9, 1963 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1227 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by Charles G. Hatch, Moderator, at 9:38 o'clock 

A. M. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. Henry B. Smith, with fifteen seconds silence 
for deceased veterans preceding the prayer. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman James D. Wilson. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit forty non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced that no smoking or eating would be allowed in the Audito- 
rium. 

Voted to dispense with the reading of the warrant and service of the Constable. 

Voted that the Moderator refer to articles by number and subject matter without 
the Moderator reading the article and the person moving an article refer to it by 
number . 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years, one 
member of the School Committee for three years, one member of the Andover Housing 
Authority for five years, and any other town officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot, also to vote on the following questions: 

QUESTION NO. 1 — "Shall section fifty-eight B of Chapter forty-eight of the General 
Laws, providing for a forty-eight hour week for permanent members of fire depart- 
ments, be accepted?" 

QUESTION NO. 2 — "Shall the Town accept the provisions of an act passed by the Gen- 
eral Court in the year nineteen hundred and sixty, providing for the establishment 
of a regional school district by the City of Lawrence and the towns of Methuen, 
North Andover and Andover and the construction, maintenance, and operation of a re- 
gional school by the said district in accordance with the provisions of a proposed 
agreement filed with the city council of said city and the selectmen of said towns?" 

All the above candidates and questions to be voted for on one ballot. The polls 
will be open from 7:00 o'clock A. M. to 7:00 o'clock P. M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of election and questions of March 4, 1963. 
The Moderator declared Charles G. Hatch elected as Moderator and the Town Clerk de- 
clared that he had previously been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties 
of that office. 

The Moderator then declared the other successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices and the Town Clerk declared that they had been sworn to the faith- 
ful performance of the duties of their offices. 

Paul W. Cronin, Selectman for Three Years 

Barbara G. Moody, School Committee for Three Years 

Winston A. Blake, Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 



12 



"Shall section fifty-eight B of Chapter forty-eight of the General Laws, providing 
for a forty-eight hour week for permanent members of fire departments, be accept- 
ed?" YES-3408, NO-2156. 

"Shall the Town accept the provisions of an act passed by the General Court in the 
year nineteen hundred and sixty, providing for the establishment of a regional 
school district by the City of Lawrence and the towns of Methuen, North Andover 
and Andover and the construction, maintenance, and operation of a regional school 
by the said district in accordance with the provisions of a proposed agreement 
filed with the city council of said city and the selectmen of said towns?" 
YES-4451, NO-1033. 

The Moderator publicly thanked the Regional Vocational School District Planning 
Committee for the untold hours of work contributed to this project. The Moderator 
then appointed Fred S. Tarbox to the "Interim Committee" as representative from 
Andover. This Committee will actually choose the site for the school and proceed 
with its construction. 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by bal- 
loT! 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED Arthur W. Cole be elected Trustee of Cor- 
nell Fund for three years. 

Upon motion by Joseph Adams of the Andover Taxpayers' Association and duly second- 
ed, it was VOTED to reconsider Articles 3 and 4 after budget appropriations had been 
voted on. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salary of elected TOWN OFFICERS for the ensuing year, 
(to be taken together with Article 4.) 

ARTICLE 4. To determine what sums of money shall be appropriated for the 1963 
Town Budget as submitted by the Town Manager and reviewed by the Finance Committee 
in their report. 

After the budget appropriations as approved by the Finance Committee had been 
voted on, it was VOTED, upon motion made by Joseph Adams and duly seconded, that the 
total budget appropriation of Articles 3 and 4, with the exception of Items 89 and 
90, be reduced by 2 percent, the allocation of this reduction among the various 
items to be within the discretion of the Town Manager, and raise and appropriate the 
following sums of money: 

Moderator Salary $ 75.00 

Selectmen Salaries 2,100.00 

Office Salaries 600.00 

Expenses 575 . 00 

Town Manager Manager's Salary 12,750.00 

Office Salary 4,535.00 

Expenses 3,400.00 
(Incl. $500 out-of-town travel) 

Town Counsel Retainer Fee 3,000.00 

Special Cases 2,000.00 

Town Accountant Salaries 16,093.00 

Expenses 1,200.00 

Treasurer Salaries 13,164.00 

Expenses 2,023.00 

Tax Collector Salaries 14,133.00 

Expenses 1,950.00 

13 



Assessors 



Town Clerk 



Elections and Registrations 



Municipal Buildings 



Planning Board 



Board of Appeals 



Police Department 



Fire Department 

Building Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Civil Defense 

Tree Department 

Insect Pest Control 

Dutch Elm Department 

Dog Officer 

Health Department 

Animal Inspector 
Public Dump 



Salaries 
Expenses 
(Incl. $150 out-of-town travel) 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 
(Incl. $100 out-of-state travel) 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

(Incl. $150 out-of-state travel) 
Equipment 

(2 police cruisers and replace- 
ment of radio equipment) 

Salaries 
Expenses 
(Incl. $150 out-of-state travel) 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Equipment (3/4 ton truck) 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salary 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salary 

Salaries 
Equipment 



19,898.00 
5,620.00 



10,809.00 
925.00 

6,405.00 
2,650.00 

6,413.00 
8,760.00 

3,721.00 
6,790.00 



891.00 
550.00 

168,963.00 
15,875.00 

5,750.00 



233,183.00 
17,685.00 



9,556.00 
1,540.00 

3,194.00 
600.00 

1,300.00 
525.00 

750.00 
2,750.00 

14,416.00 
2,125.00 

6,791.00 
1,850.00 
1,900.00 

11,141.00 
2,125.00 

600.00 
400.00 

12,432.00 
13,190.00 

600.00 

7,290.00 
4,380.00 



14 



Garbage Collection 



Expenses 

(1963 cost covers only four 
months of the contract cost, 
balance of year to be charged 
against funds appropriated in 
1962-special article 16. Cost 
of collection in 1962 also 
charged to same article) 



8,400.00 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Administration and Office 

Engineering 

Highway 






Snow Removal and Sanding 



Sidewalk Construction 



Highway Improvements 



Sewer 



Water 



>*. 



Trucks and Garage Maintenance 



Welfare 



Veterans' Services 



Salaries 33,833.00 

Expense 3,855.00 

Salaries 8,946.00 

Expenses 1,894.00 

Salaries 75,220.00 

Expense 48,900.00 

Street Lighting 35,710.00 

Equipment 26,650.00 
(Replacement of 3 trucks and 
1 loader) 

Salaries 27,600.00 

Expense 33,185.00 

Equipment 7,700.00 
(Sidewalk Tractor and Plow) 

Salaries 6,627.00 

Expense 4,717.00 

Salaries 1,800.00 

Expenses 4,500.00 
(Increase requested for contemplated 
work on Sunset Rock Road, River Road 
and Osgood Street) 

Salaries 13,516.00 

Expenses 9,100.00 

Salaries 75,551.00 

Expenses 72,700.00 

(Incl. $150 for out-of-state travel) 

Equipment 3,300.00 

(Replacement of 3/4 ton truck and 

other misc. equip.) 

Salaries 11,886.00 

Expenses 37,175.00 

Equipment (Battery Charger) 250.00 

Salary 5,381.00 

Expense 1,029.00 

Welfare Payments 65,881.00 
($68,252.00 less $2,371.00 interest 
on trust funds) 

Salaries 11,010.00 

Expenses 2,170.00 

Veterans' Benefits 28,000.00 



15 



School Department 



Memorial Hall and Elementary 
School Libraries 



Parks 



Recreation Director 



Recreation Department 



Patriotic Holidays 
Board of Retirement 

Group Life and Medical Insurance 
Spring Grove Cemetery 



Bonded Debt Payments 
and Interest 



Salaries 
Expenses 

(Incl. $1500.00 out-of-state 
travel) 

Salaries 

Expenses 

($26,310.00 less investment 

income and dog licenses $5,610.00) 

(Incl. $360.00 out-of-state 

travel) 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Equipment (Power Mower) 

Salary 
Expenses 

Salaries 

Expenses 

(Increased as result of expanding 

facilities at Pomps Pond and 

necessary maintenance of present 

facilities) 

Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Pension Payments 



Salaries 

($23,846.00 less interest on 

perpetual care funds-$4,971 . 00) 

Expenses 

Bonded Debt Payments 
Interest on Bonded Debt 
Interest-Temporary Loan 
Bond Issue Expense 



1,469,716.00 
352,219.00 



80,476.00 
20,700.00 



13,150.00 
2,300.00 
1,500.00 

7,373.00 
705.00 

20,200.00 
11,935.00 



1,872.00 

2,305.00 

530.00 

63,119.00 

15,000.00 

18,875.00 

3,400.00 

300,000.00 

88,720.00 

4,200.00 

2,000.00 



Miscellaneous : 

Town Reports 

Veterans' Quarters 

Insurance 

Damage to Persons and Property 

Postage Meter 

Industrial Development Comm. 

Personnel Review Board 

TOTAL FOR BUDGET TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION 



2,475.00 

2,880.00 

43,632.00 

500.00 

3,000.00 

300.00 

875.00 



$3,892,383.00 



16 



SPECIAL ARTICLES (All to be taken from available funds except Article 32) 

ARTICLE 8 Water drainage improvements $ 33,000.00 

ARTICLE 9 Chapter 90 Highway Construction 54,000.00 

ARTICLE 10 Establish Boundaries 2,000.00 

ARTICLE 11 Sidewalk Construction-Lovejoy Road 7,500.00 

ARTICLE 12 Improvements to Water System 85,000.00 

ARTICLE 13 Land for Pumping Station — Mouth of Fish Brook 3,000.00 

ARTICLE 15 Stabilization Fund 50,000.00 

ARTICLE 27 Land Acquisition 19,000.00 

TOTAL SPECIAL ARTICLES TO BE TRANSFERRED FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS $ 253,500.00 

ARTICLE 32 Water Main in Cross Street 16,000.00 
(to be raised by taxation) 

TOTAL SPECIAL ARTICLES $ 269,500.00 

Total BUDGET to be raised by taxation 3,892,383.00 

GRAND TOTAL BUDGET AND SPECIAL ARTICLES $ 4,161,883.00 

ARTICLE 36 VOTED to permit the Assessors to use $75,000 free 
cash to reduce the 1963 tax rate and to offset 
appropriations for capital outlay voted at the 
1963 meeting 

ARTICLE 37 VOTED to transfer $35,000 from Overlay Reserve 
to the Reserve Fund 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Town Manager and the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to 
time after January 1, 1964 in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year be- 
ginning January 1, 1964, in accordance with Section 4, Chapter 44, General Laws and 
to issue a note or notes therefor payable within one year, and to renew any note so 
issued for a period of less than one year, in accordance with Section 17 of said 
Chapter 44. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 5 as printed. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $34,224.90 for roadway improvements under 
Chapter 782 of the Acts of 1962, 100% to be reimbursed by the Commonwealth, and to 
authorize the Town to acquire necessary easements by gift, purchase, or by seizure 
by right of eminent domain, over lands supposed to belong to Herbert MacMillan, 
James Deyermond, Ruth Muller, Clarence Lane and Timothy Brennan. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 6 and appro- 
priate the sum of $34,224.90 for roadway improvements under Chapter 782 of the Acts 
of 1962, 100% to be reimbursed by the Commonwealth, and to authorize the Town to 
acquire necessary easements by gift, purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain, over lands supposed to belong to Herbert MacMillan, James Deyermond, Ruth 
Muller, Clarence Lane and Timothy Brennan. 

ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 

17 



Gleason Street in accord with plans on file at the office of the Town Clerk and as 
laid out by the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize the Town to acquire the neces- 
sary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, over 
the parcels of land shown on said plan and numbered one through ten. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 7 as 
printed . 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $52,500.00 for surface water drainage im- 
provements and authorize the construction hereinafter described, and to authorize 
the Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain, over lands supposed to be owned by Frederick Higgins, 
George Luedke, Alfred Loftus and Mildred Home. 

To install drains not less than 12 and not more than 30 inches in 
size at the following locations : 

1. Gleason Street and High Plain Road $29,200.00 

2. Porter Road 19,300.00 

3. Andover Street 4,000.00 

$52,500.00 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer from available 
funds the sum of $33,000.00 under Article 8, for surface water drainage improve- 
ments and authorize the construction hereinafter described, and to authorize the 
Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain, over lands supposed to be owned by Frederick Higgins, 
George Luedke, Alfred Loftus and Mildred Home. 

To install drains not less than 12 and not more than 30 inches in 
size at the following locations : 

1. Gleason Street and High Plain Road $29,000.00 

2. Andover Street 4,000.00 

$33,000.00 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $54,000.00 for Chapter 90 Highway Construc- 
tion, the Town to be reimbursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County, and 
to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, by pur- 
chase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, over land supposed to belong to 
Realty Construction of New England, Inc. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $54,000.00 under Article 9 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, the Town to be 
reimbursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County, and to authorize the 
Town to acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure 
by right of eminent domain, over land supposed to belong to Realty Construction of 
New England, Inc. The Vote Yes-583, No-5, voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $2,000.00 to establish boundaries and lay 
out the lines of existing ways used publicly but not accepted as public ways by 
Town Meeting action. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer the sum of $2,000.00 from 
available funds under Article 10. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $35,000.00 for sidewalk construction on 
Love joy Road. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer the sum of $7,500.00 from 



4 



available funds under Article 11. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $90,000.00 for improvements to the water 
system and authorize the following construction: 

To install water mains not less than six inches and not more than 
sixteen inches in size in the following locations: 

(a) Cross country from Prospect Hill Reservoir in the direction 
of Vine Street to Salem 2900 feet more or less 12 inch 

(b) In South Main Street from the end of the existing 8 inch 
near Ballardvale Road to the existing 8 inch near Rocky Hill 
Road 3500 feet more or less 10 inch 

And authorize the Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or 
by seizure by right of eminent domain, over land supposed to belong to the Mabel B. 
Ward Trust and Amy G. Taft. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer the sum of 
$85,000.00 from available funds for improvements to the water system and authorize 
the following construction: 

To install water mains not less than six inches and not more than 
sixteen inches in size in the following locations : 

(a) Cross country from Prospect Hill Reservoir in the direction 
of Vine Street to Salem 2900 feet more or less 12 inch 

(b) In South Main Street from the end of the existing 8 inch 
near Ballardvale Road to the existing 8 inch near Rocky Hill 
Road 3500 feet more or less 10 inch 

And authorize the Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or 
by seizure by right of eminent domain, over land supposed to belong to the Mabel B. 
Ward Trust and Amy G. Taft. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $3,000.00 to obtain land at the mouth of 
Fish Brook on the Merrimack River for the site of a pumping station, and the neces- 
sary access thereto. And authorize the Town the right to obtain the necessary land 
and easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, from 
Andover Village Improvement Society and Jacob Shlekis, the supposed owners of the 
land. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $3,000.00 under Article 13. The Vote-Yes 618—No 5 — voted by more than 2/3 as 
required. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $5,000.00 for the purpose of preparing pre- 
liminary plans for a new Public Works Building. 

Article 14 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate by taxation or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $100,000 to establish a stabilization fund 
under Section 5B of Chapter 40 of the General Law. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $50,000 under Article 15 to establish a stabilization fund under Section 5B of 
Chapter 40 of the General Law. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will appropriate $880,000 or any other sum to con- 

19 



struct a sewage pumping station off Riverina Road, a trunk sewer along Haverhill 
Street, from Haverhill Street to Balmoral Street, along Balmoral, York and Haverhill 
Streets, an intercepting sewer starting from Essex Street and extending in a souther- 
ly direction along the east bank of the Shawsheen River to Abbot Street, a trunk 
sewer extending from Andover Street to Lowell Street, with a connecting line to Res- 
ervation Road, a collecting sewer from the end of Kirkland Drive to Shawsheen Road, 
along Shawsheen Road and from Shawsheen Road crossing Lincoln Street to Arthur Road 
and lateral sewers in Abbot Street, Porter Road, Karlton Circle, Forbes Lane, Alden 
Road, Andover Street, Dascomb Road, Lovejoy Road, Lowell Street, Argilla Road, Straw- 
berry Hill Road, Rennie Drive, Lincoln Street, Chandler Circle, Lowell Street, Shir- 
ley Road, Virginia Road, High Plain Road and Beacon Street; to authorize the Select- 
men to acquire thenecessary land and easements by gift, by purchase or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain; to authorize the acceptance of federal aid for the work; 
and to determine how the appropriation will be raised, whether by taxation, transfer 
or borrowing or any combination of the foregoing. 

Article 16 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 17. (A) To see if the Town will determine that the need for an urban re- 
newal program exists in the Town. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to use the secret ballot on this article. 
The Vote Yes 314 — No 393 — more than 25% of the voters present . 

Article 17 (A) was defeated. The VOTE Yes 254— No 903. 

ARTICLE 17. (B) To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to execute on be- 
half of the Town a "Cooperation Agreement" between the Town and the Andover Housing 
Authority providing for the cooperation required by the United States with respect to 
the Central Andover Urban Renewal Project Mass. R-22; said project to be carried out 
in accordance with a plan in substantially the form of the Land Assembly and Redevel- 
opment Plan for the project area dated February, 1963 on file in the offices of the 
Selectmen, Town Manager, Town Clerk and Andover Housing Authority to be adopted by 
the Authority subsequent to action of the Town under Article 17 (A) ; and said cooper- 
ation agreement containing provisions with respect to the making of the local grants 
in aid required by the United States in the form of cash, tax credits, site improve- 
ments, conveyance of town owned land, street and utility work and other forms of 
cooperation; copies of a suggested draft of which agreement dated February 1963 are 
on file in the offices of the Selectmen, the Town Manager, the Town Clerk and the 
Andover Housing Authority. 

Article 17 (B) was unanimously defeated. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town pursuant to the provisions of Section 26CC of the 
Housing Authority Law contained in Chapter 121 of the General Laws as most recently 
amended, will vote to raise and appropriate by taxation and/or available funds and/ 
or by bond issue the sum of $359,300 for the purpose of defraying such part of the 
development, acquisition, and operating costs of the Central Andover Urban Renewal 
Project Mass. R-22 described in Article 17 (B) as will not be met by contributions or 
grants from the Federal Government or otherwise, and will authorize the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Emergency Finance Board to borrow the whole or any part of 
the same. 

Article 18 was unanimously defeated. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote by resolution: to declare that there 
exists in the town a need for low-rent housing at rents within the means of families 
of low income, as defined in the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended, which 
need is not being adequately met by private enterprise; to approve an application of 
the Andover Housing Authority to the Public Housing Administration, an agency author- 
ized by the said Act to provide financial assistance to local public housing agencies 
for undertaking and carrying out preliminary planning of low-rent housing projects, 
for a preliminary loan in an amount not to exceed $4,000 for surveys and planning in 
connection with low-rent housing projects of not to exceed approximately 20 dwelling 
units, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to execute on behalf of the town a 

20 



'Cooperation Agreement', between the town and the Andover Housing Authority, sub- 
stantially in the form of a proposed agreement of which copies are on file in the 
office of the Board of Selectmen, the Andover Housing Authority and the Town Clerk, 
providing for the local cooperation as may be required by the Public Housing Admin- 
istration pursuant to the said Act. 

Article 19 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence A to 
Business , the following parcel of land along Bartlett Street and Chestnut Street: 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Bartlett Street and Chestnut 
Street and running westerly along the center line of Chestnut Street to a point oppo- 
site the westerly boundary of Lot #33 as shown on Town Assessors' Map #39, 1962 edi- 
tion; thence turning and running northerly along the westerly boundary of said Lot 
#33 and easterly along the northerly boundaries of Lots #33, #34, and #37 to the cen- 
ter line of Bartlett Street; thence running southerly along the center line of Bart- 
lett Street to the point of beginning. 

Article 20 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to change from Business to Single Resi- 
dence A, the following parcel of land at Florence Street and Park Street: 

Beginning at the northwest corner of Lot #83 on Town Assessors' Map #39, 1962 
edition and running easterly along the northerly boundary of said Lot #83 to its in- 
tersection with Lot #87; thence turning and running northerly, easterly and southerly 
along the boundaries of said Lot #87 to Park Street; thence crossing Park Street and 
running southerly, westerly and northerly along the boundaries of Lot #98 to the cen- 
ter line of Park Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of 
Park Street to a point opposite the westerly boundary of Lot #10; thence turning and 
running northerly along said westerly boundary of Lot #10 to its intersection with 
the southerly boundary of Lot #11; thence turning and running westerly, northerly 
and easterly along the boundaries of said Lot #11 to the westerly side of Florence 
Street and continuing in a straight line to the point of beginning. 

Article 21 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to change from Business to Multiple Resi- 
dence the following parcel of land along Park Street: 

Beginning at a point on the center line of Park Street opposite the easterly bound- 
ary of Lot #99 on Town Assessors' Map #39, 1962 edition and running southerly along 
the easterly boundaries of Lots #99 and #100; thence turning and running westerly 
along the southerly boundaries of Lots #100 and #101 and #102 to a point forty feet 
(40') west of the southeasterly corner of Lot #102; thence turning and running north- 
erly to a point on the northerly boundary of said Lot #102, forty feet (40' ) west of 
the northeasterly corner of said lot; thence proceeding on the same northerly course 
to the center line of Park Street; thence turning and running easterly along the 
center line of Park Street to the point of beginning. 

Article 22 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will appropriate $1,500,000.00 or any other sum, 
to acquire the necessary land and easements and to construct, originally equip and 
furnish a town house, police station, and a fire station, all in the central part of 
the town; to authorize the acceptance of federal aid for the project; and to deter- 
mine how the appropriation will be raised, whether by taxation, transfer or borrow- 
ing or any combination of the foregoing. 

Article 23 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to provide a By-Law for the appointment 
of an Inspector of Gas Piping and Gas Appliances in buildings and whose duty shall 
be the enforcement of the rules and regulations adopted by the Board established 

21 



under Section 12H of Chapter 25 of the General Laws and as provided in the Acts of 
1960, Chapter 737, Section 3-0. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 24 as printed. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to establish an advisory committee on 
home rule to be appointed by the moderator for the purpose of examining state-local 
relations and of reporting thereon to the selectmen from time to time. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 25 as printed. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $150,000.00 or any other 
sum for the purpose of reconstructing Rogers Brook and its tributaries, and the 
sewers, other utilities, and surface drainage in connection therewith, to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or otherwise 
and to provide for the easements therefor, with the understanding that the area 
involved is from the West side of Main Street to the headwall on the East side of 
Whittier Street. 

Article 26 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation $100,000 or any 
other sum to be spent by the Land Acquisition Committee for the purpose of acquiring 
by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, land, and any build- 
ings thereon, for such school sites as may be designated by the School Committee, 
for such areas as may be designated by the Recreation Committee, for sites for munic- 
ipal buildings and municipal facilities, and for the purpose of securing options or 
refusals or making down payments or part payments on any such lands, including any 
buildings thereon, or obtaining easements; said Land Acquisition Committee having 
the right to advise as to any parcel of land to be acquired, but its advice not to 
be controlling; no money to be spent without the approval of the Board of Selectmen; 
on petition of the Land Acquisition Committee. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer from available 
funds the sum of $19,000 under Article 27 to be spent by the Land Acquisition Commit- 
tee for the purpose of acquiring by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain, land, and any buildings thereon, for such school sites as may be 
designated by the School Committee, for such areas as may be designated by the Recre- 
ation Committee, for sites for municipal buildings and municipal facilities, and for 
the purpose of securing options or refusals or making down payments or part payments 
on any such lands, including any buildings thereon, or obtaining easements; said 
Land Acquisition Committee having the right to advise as to any parcel of land to be 
acquired, but its advice not to be controlling; no money to be spent without the ap- 
proval of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to make the following amendment to the 
Zoning By-law by adding to Section XI, the following subsection: 

6. (a) In Single Residence, Multiple Residence, Apartment District and 
Educational District, the parking or keeping of a truck or com- 
mercial vehicle, on property in use as a residence, shall be 
deemed a permitted accessory use, provided: 

1. The truck or commercial vehicle does not exceed three- 
quarter (3/4) ton capacity, manufacturer's rating, and 

2. The truck or commercial vehicle is used as a means of 
transport to and from the resident's place of business, and 

3. The truck or commercial vehicle is parked or kept in a 
garage, and 

4. The truck or commercial vehicle is not loaded with flam- 
mable, noxious or dangerous materials. 

22 



(b) In all other districts, the parking or keeping of vehicles 
customarily employed in connection with permitted uses shall 
be deemed accessory. 

(c) The Board of Appeals may, under Section XIII, of this by-law, 
grant a special permit for the parking or keeping, in Single 
Residence, Multiple Residence, Apartment and Educational Dis- 
tricts, of vehicles or equipment other than those allowed in 
6 (a) above, provided that the Board finds such parking will 
not, under the circumstances, be detrimental to the neighbor- 
hood. The Board may impose such conditions as it deems neces- 
sary to safeguard the neighborhood, including limitations of 
time, number of vehicles, weight or capacity of vehicles or 
equipment. Among other things, the Board shall consider size, 
location of the lot, density of the neighborhood, vehicular 
access, garaging or parking facilities. 

(d) A temporary permit, not exceeding one year, may be granted at 
the discretion of the Building Inspector for the parking or 
keeping of equipment, trucks or vehicles on construction sites. 

By inserting the words "and equipment" after the word "building" in Section XI, sub- 
section #5 so that the amended subsection reads as follows : 

5. In farm area, buildings and equipment incidental to a farm 
requirement shall be considered an accessory use and on lots 
of five acres or over, the keeping of riding or driving horses, 
all subject to the Board of Health regulations. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to make the following amend- 
ment to the Zoning By-law by adding to Section XI, the following subsection: 

6. (a) In Single Residence, Multiple Residence, Apartment District and 

Educational District, the parking or keeping of a truck or com- 
mercial vehicle, on property in use as a residence, shall be 
deemed a permitted accessory use, provided: 

1. The truck or commercial vehicle does not exceed three- 
quarter (3/4) ton capacity, manufacturer's rating, and 

2. The truck or commercial vehicle is used as a means of 
transport to and from the resident's place of business, and 

3. The truck or commercial vehicle is parked or kept in a 
garage, and 

4. The truck or commercial vehicle is not loaded with flam- 
mable, noxious or dangerous materials. 

(b) In all other districts, the parking or keeping of vehicles 
customarily employed in connection with permitted uses shall 
be deemed accessory . 

(c) The Board of Appeals may, under Section XIII, of this by-law, 
grant a special permit for the parking or keeping, in Single 
Residence, Multiple Residence, Apartment and Educational Dis- 
tricts, of vehicles or equipment other than those allowed in 
6(a) above, provided that the Board finds such parking will 
not under the circumstances, be detrimental to the neighbor- 
hood. The Board may impose such conditions as it deems neces- 
sary to safeguard the neighborhood, including limitations of 
time, number of vehicles, weight or capacity of vehicles or 
equipment. Among other things, the Board shall consider size, 
location of the lot, density of the neighborhood, vehicular 
access, garaging or parking facilities. 

23 



(d) A temporary permit, not exceeding one year, may be granted at 
the discretion of the Building Inspector for the parking or 
keeping of equipment, trucks or vehicles on construction sites. 

By inserting the words "and equipment" after the word "building" in Section XI, sub- 
section #5 so that the amended subsection reads as follows: 

5. In farm area, buildings and equipment incidental to a farm 

requirement shall be considered an accessory use and on lots 
of five acres or over, the keeping of riding or driving horses, 
all subject to the Board of Health regulations. 

A quorum was present. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold T. 
King, relative to Article 28. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section X, Para- 
graph 2, Subsection 1 of the Zoning By-law, as amended most recently in 1958 by the 
insertion of the following words: 

"and no person shall remove, even if not for sale, more than 1000 cubic 
yards of soil, loam, sand or gravel" 

so that said Section X, Paragraph 2, Subsection 1 will read as follows: 

"Anything in any other by-law of this town to the contrary notwith- 
standing, no person shall remove for the purpose of sale any soil, 
loam, sand or gravel, and no person shall remove, even if not for 
sale, more than 1000 cubic yards of soil, loam, sand or gravel from 
any land not in public use in any part of the town without first 
obtaining written permit therefor from the Board of Selectmen after 
a public hearing at which all interested persons shall be given an 
opportunity to be heard. At least twenty days' notice of the time 
and place of such hearing shall, at the expense of the applicant 
for a permit, be published in a newspaper of general circulation in 
the Town." 

Article 29 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to continue for the further period of 
one year a committee of three (3) to study and revise the Town By-Laws and Zoning 
By-Laws, appointed by the Selectmen for that purpose under Article 17 of the Town 
Warrant passed at the 1957 Town Meeting, such committee to report at the next annual 
town meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 30 as printed. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will accept a report entitled "Town of Andover, 
Mass., Report on a Master Plan for Storm Drainage, February, 1962", by Camp, Dresser, 
and McKee, Consulting Engineers, Boston, Mass., and adopt said report, and all writ- 
ten material, maps, and plans included therein as a Master Plan for Storm Drainage 
for the Town . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 31 as printed. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $16,000 for constructing 1100 feet more or 
less of 12" water main in Cross Street from River Road as required by the master 
plan for water distribution in Andover. Said main to be installed under the better- 
ment act, on petition of Martin T. Caughey, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise by taxation the sum of $16,000 
under Article 32. The Vote Yes 255-No 208, passed by a majority. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to install a sewer main on Shipman Road 
for a distance of 800 feet, more or less, and across country to West Wind Road for a 

24 



distance of 750 feet, more or less, and raise by taxation and appropriate or trans- 
fer from available funds, the sum of $26,000.00; and authorize the Town to acquire 
the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent do- 
main, on petition of John A. James and others. 

Article 33 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will appropriate $1,000 toward the cost of Christ- 
mas lights (costing approximately $3,000), the balance of which will be borne by the 
Andover Board of Trade, as provided in Chapter 40, Section 5, Subsection 46 of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, on petition of Kenneth P. Thomp- 
son and others. 

Article 34 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Spring Grove Road from its junction with Abbot Street a distance of one thousand 
(1000) feet, more or less, to the southward and to authorize the Selectmen to use 
part of Spring Grove Cemetery for the road; to authorize the Selectmen to acquire 
the necessary land and easements by gift, purchase, seizure, or by right of eminent 
domain; to raise and appropriate the sum of thirty eight thousand, two hundred 
(38,200) dollars for the purpose of this article; betterments to be assessed upon 
the abutting owners, upon petition of Salvatore T. Torrisi and others. 

Article 35 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use $200,000 
free cash to reduce the 1963 tax rate and to offset appropriations for capital out- 
lay voted at the 1963 town meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to permit the Assessors to use $75,000 
free cash to reduce the 1963 tax rate and to offset appropriations for capital out- 
lay voted at the 1963 town meeting. 

ARTICLE 37 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer $50,000 from Overlay Reserve 
to the Reserve Fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer $35,000 from Overlay Reserve 
to the Reserve Fund. 

ARTICLE 38. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the treasury . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the following unexpended appropria- 
tions be transferred to surplus revenue: 



Storm Drainage-Hidden Road $ 222.44 

Sewer - Lovejoy Road 12,600.00 

Improvement to Water System 19,673.59 

Purchase New Jeep 388.02 

Purchase Tractor Loader 2,300.00 

Widening Holt & Wildwood Roads 259.24 

Water System Improvements 14,866.95 

Purchasing & Developing Land for 25,000.00 
Off-Street Parking 



25 



Item 


No. 






1 


Article 


42 - 


- 1956 


2 


Article 


25 - 


- 1961 


3 


Article 


5 - 


- 1961 


4 


Article 


20 - 


- 1961 


5 


Article 


15 - 


- 1962 


6 


Article 


20 - 


- 1962 


7 


Article 


17 - 


- 1962 


8 


Article 


11 • 


- 1957 



I tern No . 

9 Article 12 - 1957 Develop Additional Off-Street $ 3,875.68 

Parking 

$ 79,185.92 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town of Andover will change from Business to Single 
Residence A the following parcel of land: 

Beginning at the northwest corner of Lot #83 on Town Assessor's Map 39, 1962 edi- 
tion and running easterly along the northerly boundary of said Lot #83 to its inter- 
section with Lot #87; thence turning and running northerly, easterly and southerly 
along the boundaries of said Lot #87 to the center line of Park Street; thence turn- 
ing and running westerly along the center line of Park Street to its intersection 
with the center line of Florence Street; thence turning and running northerly along 
the center line of Florence Street to its intersection with the extension of the 
northerly line of Lot #83; thence turning and running easterly along said extension 
to the point of beginning, on petition of Marguerite A. Barton and others. 

Article 39 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Sagamore Drive running southerly from its intersection with Sheridan Road, the area 
leading to and including the traffic circle at the most southerly end of said Saga- 
more Drive, it being that portion of Sagamore Drive not already accepted by said 
Town as a public way, and as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled "Academy Acres, owner Roy R. Farr" 
and recorded with the Essex Registry of Deeds for the Northern District as Desk 
Plan No. 4095. A plan also being on file with the Town Clerk for the Town of Ando- 
ver, on petition of Roy R. Farr and others. 

Article 40 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way, 
a private way now known as Hawthorne Circle, located off Chandler Road, as shown on 
a plan drawn by R. B. Brasseur and duly recorded in the North Essex Registry of 
Deeds as plan #4424, in accordance with plan and description on file at the Town 
Clerk's office, on petition of Alvin C. Pariseau and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 41 as printed. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name "Cyr 
Circle", as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, 
and as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Cyr Park, Andover, Mass. Owner, Joseph S. 
Cyr, Scale l"-40.0' Date-May, 1960, Eng. Donald F. Adams, Lawrence, Mass." and 
recorded with Essex North District, Registry of Deeds as Plan #4094. A plan and 
description along with drainage and utility easements, for recording purposes being 
also on file with the Town Clerk for the Town of Andover, Mass., on petition of 
Donald C. Bassett and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 42 as printed, subject 
to receipt by the Town Clerk within 10 days of all required easements from property 
owners having interests in the street. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way Rolling Ridge 
Road as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Street Acceptance Plan of Rolling Ridge 
Road, Andover, Mass., Scale l"-40' , Dated January 15, 1963, Clinton Foster Goodwin, 
Reg. Prof. Eng., 25 Washington Sq., Haverhill, Mass." a legal description of which, 
together with the aforementioned plan are on file at the office of the Town Clerk, 
on petition of James H. Eaton III and others. 

Article 43 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way, a 
private way now known as Sherry Drive as shown on a plan by Andover Engineers, Inc., 

26 



Numbered 3367, dated October 26, 1956 duly recorded with the Essex North District 
Registry of Deeds October 25, 1956. Dependent upon the completion of specifications 
and recommendations of the Andover Planning Board as shown on above Plan 3367. The 
office of Town Clerk now has on file a plan and description of this way, on petition 
of Ruth T. Stevens and others. 

Article 44 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 45 „ To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way, a 
private way now known as Lakeside Circle, as shown on a plan by Andover Engineers, 
Inc. numbered 3906 dated July 15, 1959, duly recorded with the Essex North Registry 
of Deeds July 15, 1959. Dependent upon the completion of specifications and recom- 
mendations of the Andover Planning Board as shown on above plan 3906. The office 
of Town Clerk now has on file a plan and description of this way, on petition of 
Ruth T. Stevens and others. 

Article 45 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as public ways all 
of Amherst Road, a portion of Princeton Avenue running westerly from that portion 
of Princeton Avenue previously accepted by said Town to said Amherst Road, and a 
portion of Cornell Avenue previously accepted by said Town to said Amherst Road, as 
shown on plan of land entitled: "Section #4 Shawsheen Heights, Andover, Mass., 
Loretta Cairns, Owner, Ralph B. Brasseur, Eng . , dated September 12, 1948," recorded 
in North Essex District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 3784, a plan and description 
of which is on file at the office of the Town Clerk, on petition of Loretta R. 
Cairns and others . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 46 as printed. 

ARTICLE 47. To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
in ~g~. 

Miss Marion Hill moved that the Moderator be instructed to name a committee of 
five for the purpose of reviewing the Town Manager Charter and form of government 
which prevails in Andover, primarily for the purpose of bringing before the Town 
people, constructive changes for the best interest of the Town. This said committee 
to hold at least two public hearings between September 1, 19b3 and January 1, 1964, 
said committee to file a report of their finding with the Town Clerk by February 1, 
1964. 

This motion was defeated — the Vote Yes 120, No 152. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 4:38 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 

IRVING O. PIPER 
TOWN CLERK 



27 



Special Town Meeting 



AUGUST 14, 1963 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, July 29, 1963, the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs met and assembled in the 
Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street on Wednesday, the fourteenth day of August, 
1963 at 8:00 o'clock P. M. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 1060 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Charles G. Hatch, Moderator at 8:13 o'clock P.M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit twenty-four non-voters to the meeting. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. D. Frank Hayden. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman William Stewart. 

It was voted to dispense with the reading of the warrant and return of service by 
the constable. 

(Constable's Return) 

Essex, SS. Andover, August 14, 1963 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time 
and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attest- 
ed copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than 
five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publica- 
tion in the Lawrence Eagle-Tribune. Said warrants have been posted and published 
seven days. 

Thomas P. Eldred, Constable 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will appropriate $880,000 or any other sum to con- 
struct a sewage pumping station off Riverina Road, a trunk sewer along Haverhill 
Street, from Haverhill Street to Balmoral Street, along Balmoral, York and Haverhill 
Streets, an intercepting sewer starting from Essex Street and extending in a souther- 
ly direction along the west bank of the Shawsheen River to Argilla Road, an inter- 
cepting sewer starting from Andover Street and extending in a southerly direction 
along the east bank of the Shawsheen River to Abbot Street, a trunk sewer extending 
from Andover Street to Lowell Street, with a connecting line to Reservation Road, a 
collecting sewer from the end of Kirkland Drive to Shawsheen Road, along Shawsheen 
Road and from Shawsheen Road crossing Lincoln Street to Arthur Road and lateral 
sewers in Abbot Street, Porter Road, Karlton Circle, Forbes Lane, Alden Road, Ando- 
ver Street, Dascomb Road, Lovejoy Road, Lowell Street, Argilla Road, Strawberry Hill 
Road, Rennie Drive, Lincoln Street, Chandler Circle, Lowell Street, Shirley Road, 
Virginia Road, High Plain Road and Beacon Street; to authorize the Selectmen to ac- 
quire the necessary land and easements by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain; to authorize the acceptance of federal aid for the work; and to 
determine how the appropriation will be raised, whether by transfer or borrowing or 
any combination of the foregoing. Betterments will be assessed. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the sum of $880,000 be appropriated 
to construct a sewage pumping station off Riverina Road, a trunk sewer along Haver- 
hill Street, from Haverhill Street to Balmoral Street, along Balmoral, York and 
Haverhill Streets, an intercepting sewer starting from Essex Street and extending in 
a southerly direction along the west bank of the Shawsheen River to Argilla Road, an 

28 



intercepting sewer starting from A n dover Street and extending in a southerly direc- 
tion along the east bank of the Shawsheen River to Abbot Street, a trunk sewer ex- 
tending from Andover Street to Lowell Street, with a connecting line to Reservation 
Road, a collecting sewer from the end of Kirkland Drive to Shawsheen Road, along 
Shawsheen Road and from Shawsheen Road crossing Lincoln Street to Arthur Road and 
lateral sewers in Abbot Street, Porter Road, Karlton Circle, Forbes Lane, Alden 
Road, Andover Street, Dascomb Road, Love joy Road, Lowell Street, Argilla Road, 
Strawberry Hill Road, Rennie Drive, Lincoln Street, Chandler Circle, Lowell Street, 
Shirley Road, Virginia Road, High Plain Road and Beacon Street; that the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to acquire the necessary land and easements by gift, pur- 
chase or eminent domain; that the Town Manager is authorized to accept, contract for, 
and expend federal aid for the foregoing work in addition to the amount appropriated 
hereby; and that to meet the appropriation made by this vote the sum of $25,000 
shall be transferred from free cash and the treasurer with the approval of the Sel- 
ectmen is authorized to issue $855,000 bonds or notes of the Town, and that better- 
ments be assessed. The VOTE YES-697, NO-142. Voted by more than 2/3 as required. 
A quorum was present from the opening of the meeting through the passage of the 
voting for the bonds. 

ARTI CLE 2 . To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

At this point, Selectman James D. Wilson, thanked the many voters for turning out 
to the meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 9:45 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 

IRVING 0. PIPER 
TOWN CLERK 



29 



Town Manager 



Andover's extensive land area and facilities, coupled with a valuable location, have con- 
tinued to create growth problems in land development that have required extensive study and plan- 
ning on the part of your town officials during the past year. 

Andover is fortunate to have a land area of 32 square miles serviced with 1 65 miles of its 
own road system. However, during the past five years, we have witnessed the construction of 
Interstate Route 93, north and south, Interstate Route 495, east and west, while already harboring 
Routes 28, 114 and 133. Situated as we are some 25 miles from Boston, 20 miles from the coast- 
line, and 75 miles from the mountain area, we will continue to receive the impact of this growth. 

In 1963, we witnessed the constant push for land development in our community. This year, 
our Planning Board reviewed 14 subdivision plans and approved 8 subdivision developments. All of 
our Town departments, and particularly those immediately affected by land development - namely, 
Water and Sewer, Highway (drainage), Fire, Police, and School -, have worked diligently to accom- 
modate and serve the increased requests for service from our citizens. Our population census 
figure of 17, 134 hardly begins to reflect the extended area which must be constantly served by town 
departments. Following are but a few of the progressive steps we have taken to better meet the 
needs of our growing community: 

In 1963, we broke ground for the reconstruction of Rogers Brook, a problem that has been 
plaguing our community for many years. With 50% State Matching Funds, we were able to complete 
the first stage of construction from the Shawsheen River to Main Street, thereby harnessing the 
water in a 72" reenforced concrete pipe with a direct flow to the river. This first stage of construc- 
tion has already demonstrated its capacity to drain water rapidly from the center of town and prevent 
immediate flooding in the Chestnut St. area during heavy rains. 

Water improvements have been a constant part of our Capital Expenditure Program and this 
year it was possible to increase our water supply at the Bancroft Reservoir with the construction of 
a 12" main to the Bancroft site, effecting a double feed system to this supply. A 10" water main was 
extended in South Main Street to provide improved service to this area. 

With the completion of a Master Drainage Plan which provides a program for the construction 
of drainage lines throughout the town, it was possible this year to construct a drainage system on 
Gleason Street and River Road as part of our Capital Improvement Program. 

In August of this year, we were able to qualify for a program of accelerated sewer construc- 
tion at a cost of $1, 719, 000. with $839, 000. of this amount being granted by the Federal Government. 
A Special Town Meeting called for the purpose of voting on this project gave it almost unanimous sup- 
port. The accelerated sewer construction project will provide for approximately 13 miles of new 
sewer mains in four separate areas of town where a sanitary system is vital to the welfare of our 
community. Under this program, all areas receiving benefit from the sewer construction will be 
charged a betterment assessment. 

The Town's Recreation facilities were improved this year with the purchase of the Camp 
Olympia and Manning properties adjacent to Pomps Pond. This land was purchased through the Land 
Acquisition program. A section of the Manning land has already been used to extend the beach faci- 
lities at Pomps and the Camp Olympia grounds are being converted to play areas and the buildings 
renovatedfor group activities . 



30 



Perhaps our most important growth area will be noted in the program for new high school 
facilities. We have constantly had this need under review during the past two years and, in 1963, 
a Building Committee was appointed to study the requirements of our school program as projected 
by the School Committee and to begin work on the preliminary planning for new facilities. The 
Warrant for our 1964 Town Meeting will include an article calling for the appropriation of funds to 
hire an architect to draft plans for a new high school facility. 

1963 witnessed the first step in programming a Stabilization Fund to provide for future capi- 
tal expenditures for schools. This fund of $50,000. marks a "first" in Andover's method of finan- 
cing. 

The above programs represent but a few of the accomplishments of the past year and, as our 
citizens know, these improvements were made without levying an undue burden on the taxpayer. 

The progress we have made during the year is the direct result of a coordinated effort on 
the part of all of our town boards and committees who have given of their time to contribute a ser- 
vice to their community. This citizen participation, joined by the cooperation of the various depart- 
ments of our town government, has made the year 1963 a most successful one for our community. 



THOMAS E. DUFF 
Town Manager 



31 



Town Clerk 



I hereby submit my report for the Office of the Town Clerk for the year 1963 . 



The total number of registered voters in Andover as of July 1, 1963 was 9,360 by 
Precincts as follows: 



1 — 1,963 

2 — 1,311 

3 — 1,657 



4 — 1,699 

5 — 771 

6 — 1,959 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Number of births recorded 

Males 149 
Females 148 



297 



Number of deaths recorded 

Males 79 
Females 65 

Number of marriages recorded 



144 



130 



FEES 

Fees collected and turned over to the Town Treasurer 

Marriage Intentions 

Alcoholic Beverage Licenses 

One-Day Alcoholic Beverage Licenses 

Auto Dealers' Licenses 

Common Victualers' Licenses 

Certified copies of Vital Statistics 

Uniform Commercial Code Fees 

Fish and Game License Fees 

Dog License Fees 

Street Lists 

Miscellaneous Fees 

Total Fees 



> 274.00 

8,700.00 

40.00 

175.00 

58.00 

644.50 

1,075.00 

170.30 

381.00 

322.00 

470.75 

$12,310.55 



IRVING 0. PIPER 
Town Clerk 



32 



Treasurer 



Receipts and payments for year were as follows: 

Balance January 1, 1963 $ 1,029,625.17 

Receipts 6,319, 774. 19 

7,349,399.36 

Payments 6, 261, 676. 88 

Balance on hand December 31, 1963 $ 1,087,722.48 

Included in the above receipts are the following: 

Parking Meter Collections $ 8,380.51 

Off-street Parking 328.27 

Income from invested surplus funds 15,630.47 

Dividend on Group Insurance 1, 922. 56 

Blue Cross Blue Shield Premium Refund 1, 148.00 

Compensation from Commonwealth for withholding taxes 185.02 
Deductions from salaries: 

Federal withholding taxes 363,226.35 

State withholding taxes 33, 857. 72 

United Fund contributions from employees 999.30 

Payroll savings -school employees 84, 765. 50 

United States Savings Bonds 22,780. 19 

Teachers' Retirement 61,999-95 

Teachers' Dues 1,212.00 

Municipal Employees' Retirement 52,638.87 

Blue Cross -Blue Shield and Insurance Premiums 38, 036. 03 

One bond sale for $855, 000 was held, the proceeds to be used, together with federal funds and 

$25,000.00 from available funds, for sewer extension under the Accelerated Public Works Program. 
The $855, 000 is not included in the above receipts. The balance in the account is $794, 575. 65 of 
which $668,475 is invested in United State Treasury Bills. 

There were two tax title redemptions amounting to $103. 11. 

Cemetery perpetual care and trust funds, as well as those of the Retirement Board, all in the Trea- 
surer's custody, are listed on other pages of this report. 



ANNA M. GREELEY 
Town Treasurer 



33 



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36 




fax Collector 





POLL TAXES 


Collected 


Abated 


1963 


1963 



Year 



1962 $ 48.00 $ 38.00 

1963 8, 612. 00 * 1, 344. 00 
* Of this Amount: 

Exemptions to Men Over 65 years $1, 080. 00 
Exemptions to Men in Armed Services $168. 00 



Outstanding 
Jan. 1, 1964 



$ 



30.00 
398. 00 



FARM ANIMAL EXCISE 



1962 
1963 



.20 
223. 14 



31. 13 



63.88 
54.50 



PERSONAL TAXES 



1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 



48.08 

332.80 

137.86 

579.80 

2,636.40 

124, 199.75 



65.00 
2,204.00 



7. 80 

391.95 

293. 80 

834. 60 

5,914.55 



REAL ESTATE TAXES 



1958 $ 1,437.15 

1959 2,490.80 

1960 6,970.83 

1961 11,032.42 

1962 48,217.96 

1963 2,598,797.72 
**Of this amount: 

Veterans' Exemptions $13,067.40 



** 



36.40 

1, 677.00 

23, 505.95 



278.20 

1, 378.00 

2,469. 19 

4,431.82 

18, 317.74 

92,519.65 



1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 



MOTOR VEHICLE TAXES 
92.53 



413.92 

1,459. 17 

2,487.64 

65, 374.41 

330,237.45 



10,632. 16 
32, 518.48 



274.23 
2,460.07 
5, 842. 88 
6, 578.06 
6,047.56 
6,099.45 
103,026.67 



MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTIONS 



Sewer Betterments 
Water Betterments 
Water Liens 
Water Service 
Committed Interest 
Interest 



$ 16,038. 16 
3,086. 33 
4,046. 52 
470.60 
3,403.76 
4, 815.78 



37 



Summary Of Collector's Cash Account 



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38 






Assessor 



Number of Polls Assessed 
Number of Persons Assessed 



5164 
6428 



Valuation -Personal Property 
Valuation-Real Estate 

Tax on Polls 

Tax on Personal Property 

Tax on Real Estate 

Apportioned Sewers 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens Added to Taxes 
Water Services Added to Taxei 



4,502,900.00 
93,503,500.00 

10, 328.00 

130,584. 10 

2,711,601.50 

6,490.09 

3,652. 18 

3,863.49 

671.85 



$98,006,400.00 



$ 2,852,513.60 



Abatements 

Poll Taxes 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Water Liens 

Water Service 

Apportioned Sewer 

Committed Interest 
Rate of Taxation per $1, 000-$29. 00 

Valuation-Farm Animal 

Tax-Farm Animal 

Rate of Taxation per $1, 000-$5. 00 

Number of Assessed: 
Horses 
Cows 

Yearlings, Bulls & Heifers 
Swine 
Sheep 
Fowl 
All Other 

No. of Acres Assessed 
No. of Dwellings Assessed 



914.00 

2,204.00 

8,665.30 

32. 11 

86.35 

100.22 

160.28 



61,715.50 
308.77 



84 

162 

13 

230 

20 

7,223 

16, 157 

18,115.65 

4,644 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 



No. of Vehicles Assessed 

Assessed Valuation 

Excise 

Abatements 

Rate per $1, 000-$66. 00 



10,685 

8, 141,080 

459,816.95 

32,001.26 



39 



Additional Assessments 



No. of Persons Assessed (Personal) 
No. of Persons Assessed (real) 
Valuation-Real Estate 
Valuation-Personal Property 

Tax on Real Estate 

Tax on Personal Property 







3 






4 




23, 


700 




57, 


700 




687 


.30 


1, 


,673 


. 30 



Real Estate Exempt From Taxation 

Clause 1 -Property of United States 
Clause 2 -Property of Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts 
Clause 3-Property of Education Corp. 
Clause 3 -Property of Charitable Corp. 
Clause 3-Property of Benevolent Corp. 
Clause 11-Houses of Religious Worship 

Parsonages 
Clause 12-Cemeteries 
Andover Housing Authority 
No. of Acres Exempt-3, 461 . 27 



178,850.00 

337,700.00 

22,032,035.00 

73,275. 00 

108,400.00 

1,694,725.00 

90,500.00 

217,750. 00 

906,250.00 



A. D. Maclaren 
William H. Russell 
Selby B.Groff 



MUNICIPAL PROPERTIES AND PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS 



Land and 
Buildings 



Equip, and 
Other Prop. 



Total 



Town Hall 

Fire Department 

Police Department 

Schools 

Library 

Water Department 

Sewer Department 

Highway Department 

Parks & Playgrounds 

Infirmary 

Spring Grove Cemetery 

Weights & Measures 

Town Scales 

Community Hall B'Vale 

Public Dump 

Other Town Property 

Public Works 



144, 


950 


62, 


250 




825 


6,262, 


825 


290, 


700 


332, 


625 


14, 


975 


9, 


375 


81, 


000 


71, 


675 


71, 


650 




600 


20, 


275 


4, 


625 


222, 


125 


23, 


175 


7,613, 


650 



15, 


150 


60, 


000 


4, 


000 


252, 


000 


40, 


000 


1,430, 


030 


763, 


095 


87, 


000 


6, 


500 


2, 


500 


1, 


125 


1, 


000 




600 




400 


1, 


000 


1, 


500 


2,665, 


900 



; 160,100 

122,250 

4,825 

6, 514,825 

330,700 

1,762,655 

778,070 

96,375 

87, 500 

74, 175 

72,775 

1,000 

1,200 

20,675 

5,625 

223,625 

23, 175 

10,279,550 



40 



Trustees And Staff Of Memorial Hall Library 



ANDREW A. CAFFREY CORNELIA H. FITTS 

LEO F. DALEY DANIEL FRISHMAN 

EDWARD I. ERICKSON ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

ELINOR E L. WASHBURN 

Chairman 
ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

Secretary 
CORNELIA H. FITTS 

Treasurer 
LEO F. DALEY 

Librarian 
MIRIAM PUTNAM 

MARGARET D. MANNING, Assistant Librarian in charge of Readers' Services 
MARGARET LANE**, Supervisor of Children's Services, 

Memorial Hall Library and Elementary School Libraries 
ELIZABETH M. RUSSELL***, Supervisor of Children's Services, 

Memorial Hall Library and Elementary School Libraries 
MARGARET S. BERRY, Children's and Elementary School Librarian 
ALICE L.CARLTON, Elementary School Librarian 
HELEN HILTON, Elementary School Librarian 
GEORGANNE STOTT*, Acting Elementary School Librarian 
NANCY A. PENDLEBURY, Professional Librarian 
CONSTANCE R. SMYTH*, Professional Librarian 
ELEANORE S. PLUMMER, Library Assistant II 
ETHEL M. WILSON, Library Assistant II 
HARRIET J. GILCREAST*, Library Assistant II 
RUTH BERTHOLD*, Library Assistant I 
PAULINE D. DOWNES*, Library Assistant I 
JEAN L. FISHER*, Library Assistant I 
MARJORIE L. JOHNSON*, Library As sis tant I 
MILDRED N. KRAUSE, Library Assistant I 
MARTHA MacCAUSLAND, Library Assistant I, Ballard Vale Branch 



Building Custodians 
EVERETT T. WARD 
WILLIAM E. ARNOLD* 



* Part-Time 

** Resigned 

*** Appointed September 1 



41 



THE MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY SETS ITS COURSE 



Last year's report found the Memorial Hall Library at a turning-point. This year, because 
of decisions taken in 1963, its future course seems more clearly indicated. 

The decision of the Library Board, with the approval of the Selectmen and the Town Mana- 
ger, to accept a regional role for the Memorial Hall Library is perhaps the most important of all 
actions taken during the last twelve months. This means that Andover will be one of five geogra- 
phical sub-centers, in the about-to-be established Eastern Regional Public Library System, with 
proposed headquarters at the Boston Public Library. We deem it an honor that Andover should 
have been chosen and look forward with anticipation to being part of this pioneer undertaking, 
though no definite date can be given at this time for the start of the the new service. Probably it 
will not be before next spring and it is conceivable that even then only the first phase of the plan will 
go into operation with other parts of the program being undertaken as rapidly as possible. Andover, 
then, will receive funds from the regional budget for its wider service. 

Another step taken in 1963, important to the forward progress of the library, was the deci- 
sion to draw up new plans for the library addition scheduled to be undertaken in 1965. 

Since the 1955 plans, as they stand, do not give sufficient space for future growth and since 
there was some difference of opinion as to the outside architectural propriety, it seemed wise to 
make a fresh approach to our rather difficult architectural problem. 

In 1955, too, we rather underestimated population growth. Since 1955, moreover, student 
use has markedly accelerated and may well double in the 1970's; more and more adults seek the 
library in order to keep abreast of changing and proliferating knowledge; larger book collections 
are even now of first necessity. For the future there may well be more emphasis on the newer 

media - tapes, teaching machines, etc; the 
regional service will mean an expanded role for 
the library; future town growth may mean that 
some extension services to other parts of Ando- 
ver may be desired. Short of an economic cata- 
clysm, which would destroy the area's economic 
viability, we see ahead a long period of conti- 
nuous library growth. 

The new plans for the building, prepared 
by our architect with the assistance of our libra- 
ry consultant, will receive our serious study. 
They envision an L- shaped addition to the South 
and West which would seem to offer good interior 
functional arrangements, adequate capacity for 
books, readers and services and flexibility for 
alternative use of space at some later time and 
for future extension if ever necessary. 

Two pieces of legislation in 1963, one at the state level, the other at the federal level, had 
interest for public libraries. 

At the last session the General Court passed an amendment to the I960 State Aid to Public 
Libraries Act which restored to the legislation its original intent to provide new money for the im- 
provement of financial support of public libraries in Massachusetts. Until now the grants-in-aid 
have been financed out of the proceeds of the income tax money which would have come to the 
communities anyway. 




A typical busy afternoon 



42 



The second bill, the Library Services and Construction Act, has passed the Senate by a 
vote of eighty-nine to seven and will come before the House for action early in January. If passed, 
it has considerable implications for public library development in this country. There is even the 
possibility, if Massachusetts qualifies and the community approves, that funds might be available 
to help offset the cost of our own library addition. 

Progress, too, was made this past year in facing up to the problem of student use in libra- 
ries and the adequacy and availability of books and other materials to young people in Andover's 
public and school libraries. 

A series of meetings were held in which the school superintendent, the curriculum coordi- 
nator, school administrators, school and public librarians participated. Their discussions were 
enriched by the availability of excellent background material on the subject, which had been pre- 
pared for the annual American Library Association Conference, and the recently published Deiches 
report, a study of student use in the Baltimore area, as the local group explored ways of coordina- 
ting Andover's library resources and services. 

Ultimately, it is hoped that there will be a joint statement setting forth common goals, de- 
lineating special areas of responsibility and providing the machinery for continuing study and 
collaboration. 

This exploration comes at a particularly strategic time as more adequate facilities for high 
school and public libraries are being studied. 

The exploration seems very relevant to us as we see our building bursting at the seams, 
circulation rising, with an ever growing need to try to balance off the legitimate demands of the 
many segments of our public of which students are an immensely important part. 

Our gain of almost 9, 000 was mainly in the issue of material from the Adult Department. 
Hitherto, in recent years, the Children's Department has frequently had the larger gain, although 
if it did not in 1963, it still had the highest circulation in its history. 

Few will argue, we believe, but that such sustained growth must result in increased book 
budgets. Yet, even as funds become larger, demands increase almost faster so that like Alice-in- 
Wonderland we find ourselves running very hard just to stay in the same place. The greater avail- 
ability of quality paper backs has enabled us to include a wider variety of titles than might have 
been possible otherwise in the fields of science and mathematics and, more particularly, of topical 
books, important currently, but more quickly expendable. 

Like most other libraries, the steady increase in informational and reference use has been 
striking. 

For this reason, we have sought to strengthen our reference collection markedly. Thanks, 
in part, to a gift from the Andover Evening Study Program, several important reference works 
have been added during the year. Among those added were the "Dictionary of National Biography" 
and the "Cambridge History of English Literature. " 

The acquisition of federal government documents was put on a more systematic basis this 
past year. Although the distribution of state documents leaves much to be desired, we hope to be 
able to make some progress in this area another year. 

We believe that a social scientist some hundred years hence would have valuable material 
for an understanding of what American society was like in the 1960's, could he have access to the 
kinds of reference questions put to libraries in this period. As we examine a few of these questions 
put to this library last year, we note once again their wide variety and how they relate to the differ- 
ent roles people play as individuals, members of a family, as students and workers. 



43 



There were the questions which were easy to answer and those which taxed imagination and 
knowledge of sources. Here are a few: an inquirer wanted a Russian word related to Christmas 
as a name for a dog; another wished to know the effects that constant moving from place to place 
might have on children; a business man wanted material which would be helpful in making a business 
change; someone else needed to find out how the quarrels of parents affect adolescents; a club mem- 
ber sought suggestions for books to be reviewed on a club program; another asked for the address 
of the Eastman Kodak Company. 

Our children's program followed the pattern of other years with activities which included 
the weekly story hour, so effective in challenging children's imagination; the popular pre -school 
groups where three and four-year olds are introduced to the magic of books; the summer reading 
program which provides opportunity for leisurely exploration into the world of books which is less 
possible during the busy school year. 

An increased book budget for elementary school libraries this past year was a constructive 
step that we hope will be repeated until we reach a level of support which will ensure book collec- 
tions large and varied enough to meet today's school library demands. Except for a slight increase 
in hours of service at the Sanborn Elementary School Library, there has been no change in school 
library schedules. 

Two developments in recent years have given us concern: one, the deterioration in library 
conduct, particularly on the part of some junior high school boys and girls; the other, the increase 
in the amount of mutiliation and theft, especially of reference material. Part of the cause is the 
increase in numbers using the library, and in some measure, perhaps, accelerated school pres- 
sures. In each instance it may be a comparatively small number who are the offenders. 

Thanks to the constructive help of the schools and the police department and to our own 
stricter policy, library behavior is improving. The other problem of book theft is hard to get at 
but we shall do our best to solve it. 

Since most of our special activities get excellent press coverage, for which we annually 
bestow an accolade upon the Andover Townsman, we shall mention only three: an art exhibit, 
" Andover In Pictures" to which some twenty local artists contributed; a talk on how a painting is 
created, by Justin Curry, a young Andover artist, both part of our 1963 National Library Week 
celebration, and our annual Open House when George E. Brown of the Bradford Junior College Fa- 
culty talked about reading contemporary poetry. 

There were the usual book displays and other exhibits which helped to celebrate an anniver- 
sary, to display a hobbyist's enthusiam, to call attention to important happenings in the world of 
books or to focus attention on events of local, national and world significance in a year of too many 
crises . 

Two book lists compiled during the year merit special attention: the popular list "Books 
for Christmas Giving" and the "Basic Home Reference Library" comprising a selection of paper 
backs costing thirteen dollars for which requests came in from other libraries. 

Although staff changes have been so numerous as to be almost commonplace, we admit to 
being somewhat shaken when our Supervisor of Children's Services, Margaret Lane, the chief 
architect of our children's program, announced that she was leaving us to serve two years as 
librarian in a girls' school in Uskudar, Turkey. Although we admired her adventurous spirit in 
making the change, her going seemed to open up a void hard to fill for, to most people, she was 
the children's service. 

Fortune was on our side, however, as we successfully persuaded Elizabeth Russell to come 
to us from the Winchester Public Library where she was Children's Librarian. She has taken over 
the leadership of our children's department with a minimum loss of momentum and is slowly but 
surely making her own place among her colleages, with the children and in the community. 

44 



The securing of another assistant for the school and children's program proved unsuccess- 
ful though we hope to have better luck in 1964. 

There were other staff changes as well: Harriet J.Gilcreast joined the staff on a part-time 
basis assuming some of the duties previously performed by Gertrude B.Hart who retired at the end 
of 1962; Mildred M. Krause, formerly of the Sheboygan, Wisconsin Public Library, took over most 
of the work formerly done by Shirley L. Ackerman whose death, early in 1963, shocked and saddened 
us all. Martha MacCausland is now the assistant at the Ballard Vale Branch Library. 

Two other friends with long and valued library association died in 1963: Claude M.Fuess, 
a former Library Trustee, who served more than twenty years in that capacity and Eleanore G. 
Bliss, a member of the staff for thirty years until her retirement in 1959. 

Miss Putnam completed her term as President of the Massachusetts Library Association, 
an office which proved more rewarding than had been anticipated, and which involved her in several 
state wide activities particularly during National Library Week. 

Professional staff members participated in library association programs, attended state, 
regional, and national meetings, took part in a book review program for the evaluation of science 
books for children, gave talks to professional groups. 

Among the gifts to the library during the year were the following, including the Andover 
Evening Study Program gift already mentioned: money from the Andover Council of Churches to 
purchase religious books, plants for the Children's Room from the Andover Junior Garden Club, 
memorial gifts made in memory of friends and families, four copies of Rachel Carson's provocative 
"Silent Spring" from the Andover Sportsmen's Club, another grant from the Futterman fund for the 
purchase of recordings, the gay marigolds planted at the base of the flagpole by the Sanborn School 
girl scouts. 

In this report, too, we should like to give special recognition to Robert Rockwell and his 
associate, Helen Stearns, for their able leadership of our Great Books Group during its entire 
existence. 

Special appreciation, as always, goes to members of the library staff for work well-done 
and to the members of the Library Board for their continued guiding wisdom. 

This is your librarian's twenty-fifth annual report. Since she assumed her responsibility 
here, she has seen public libraries grow in strength and in general acceptance, yet she is very sure 
that their greatest growth and development lie just ahead. 




nterior View showing Expanded Children's Room. 



45 



1963 STATISTICS OF LIBRARY USE 
BOOK STOCK 



Adult 



Volumes at beginning of year 
Volumes added by purchase 
Volumes added by gift 
Lost volumes found 
Volumes lost or withdrawn 



48, 528 

Newspapers & magazines currently received 
Magazines received by gift 



47, 


611 


2, 


229 




97 




1 


-1, 


410 



Juvenile 


17, 


417 


1, 


132 




41 




2 




-655 



Total 



17,937 



65, 


028 


3, 


361 




138 




3 


-2, 


065 



66,465 

241 
60 



Adult books and other materials* 
Children's books and other materials* 
Main Library & Branch 
Elementary School Libraries 



USE 



58,274 
44, 854 



Total Circulation 



98, 137 
103, 128 
201,265 



The Library wishes to call attention to the fact that in addition to books loaned through 
school libraries to individual boys and girls, 15,027 books belonging to the school libraries and 
the Memorial Hall Library were deposited in classrooms by the school libraries, with each book 
being used from one to twenty to twenty times. 

Circulation per capita (based on I960 federal census figures - 17, 134) 11.7 

*includes magazines, pamphlets, records, mounted pictures, film strips, slides, framed prints 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRAE 

1873 




ANDOVER 
MASSACHUSETTS 



46 



Board Of Public Welfare 

Public Assistance Department statistics reveal the following: 

Old Age Assistance rolls opened the year with 81 cases and closed with 65. 81 was high for 
the year. Total expenditure for 1963 was $69,669.29 for an average of 75 cases at $928.92 per 
case. This indicates an increase of $19. 50 per case average over 1962. * 

Medical Assistance for the Aged opened the year with 23 cases and closed with 35. High 
case count for the year was 36. Total MAA expenditure was $63,059. 50 for an average of 35 cases 
at $1801. 70 per case. This is an average case decrease of $282 . 89 under 1962. * 

Aid to Families with Dependent Children opened the year with 7 cases of 21 persons. The 
year closed with 12 cases of 52 persons. This was the high for the year. Total AFDC expenditure 
was $13,201.21, for an average of 10 cases and 33 persons of $1320. 12. This is a decrease on the 
case average of $282. 89 per case under 1962. * 

Disability Assistance opened the year with 11 cases and closed the year with 14 cases. There 
was a high case count of 15. Total DA expenditure was $18,236.23, for an average case count of 13 
at $1402. 79 per case. This is a decrease of $330. 74 average per case per year. * 

General Relief opened the year with 1 case and closed the year with 2 cases and 2 persons. 
High for the year was 3 cases with 16 persons. Total GR expenditure was $1369.65 for an average 
of 2 cases with 6 persons of $684. 83 per case. This was an increase of $138.28 per case average 
over 1962. * 

Relief to Andover settled citizens in other towns and cities totalled $2, 890. 69. 

Total aid given for 1963 was $168,426.57. This, plus administrative costs of $12, 000, 
provides a gross expense of $180,426 for the year 1963. 

The Federal Government reimbursed the Town with $95,916. The cost to the Town, there- 
fore, was $84,510. The 1963 Town appropriation of $72,291 was exhausted. The differential of 
$1,219 was filled through two requests to the Finance Committee from reserve funds totalling 
$9,625.34, and through transfers of Federal moneys within the Department Aid accounts. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is expected to return a total of $50,677 to the Town, 
which by law is channeled into the Free Cash account. 

Recoveries and refunds of aid received by the Town for 1963 amounted to $3, 907. which was 
channeled to Free Cash. 

The net cost of Public Assistance to the Town, therefore, was $29,926. 

The Board of Public Assistance welcomed Mr. George Hill, 234 Andover Street, Ballardvale, 
to the Board vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. Joseph Serio. Mr. Hill was appointed by Town 
Manager Thomas E. Duff on April 1, 1963. 

No new assistance programs were initiated during the year, although several changes in the 
existing programs were integrated into Department activities. The State Legislature repealed the 
Settlement Law, effective December 31, 1963. This means that the Town will be responsible for all 
need cases within its jurisdiction from January 1, 1964, regardless of length of residence. (Like- 
wise, the Town of Andover has no future responsibility for former residents given aid and relief in 
other towns and cities of the Commonwealth. ) 



47 



Increased expenses were primarily due to an increase in the total case count of 
the more expensive types of service offered. 

Medical expenses increased drastically during the year with the concomitant 
increase in both Medical Assistance for the Aged and Disability Assistance. 

The general decrease in the average cost per case reflects the Federal and State 
Governments change of emphasis from merely handing out money to giving services 
in whatever capacity is needed and useful to restoring people to full citizenship 
status. This means more personal work by the staff. 

Benefits have also increased inasmuch as a travel and recreation allowance for 
Old Age Assistance was increased, as well as a general 5% across-the-board 
increase due to a cost of living index rise, plus an increase in legally liable 
relatives' exemptions, thus decreasing contributions. 

General Relief costs increased due to increased medical costs, and increased needs 
during the year. 

All moneys expended by the Department are under the audit supervision of both State 
and Federal Governments. 



THAYER S. WARSHAW, Chairman 
Mrs. B. Allen Rowland 
George E. Hill 



48 



The Andover Housing Authority 



The year Nineteen Hundred and Sixty-Three was the thirteenth year of occupancy of the 
Veterans' Housing Project Andover 200-1 and the fourth full year of occupancy of the Housing for 
the Elderly Project Andover 667-1. 

During January and February the Authority was extremely busy completing plans for presen- 
tation of Urban Renewal Project Mass. R-22 to the registered voters of the town. At the Annual 
Town Meeting, held on March 9, 1963, this program was defeated by a vote of 254 for and 903 
against. On May 10, 1963 the Urban Renewal Office, located at 66 Main Street, was closed. 

One new member, Winston A. Blake, was elected by the townspeople this year for a term of 
five years. George A. Noury left the Authority after serving on the Board for ten years. 

VETERANS PROJECT 

This project had a number of maintenance items completed on contract, such as: Painting 
of exterior trim, $4,250; Repairs to concrete steps and one new sidewalk, $715; Hot water tank, 
installed, $767; Replacement electric ranges, $416.94; Replacement lock sets, $275. Other main- 
tenance problems were repairs to the heating system, repairs and replacement of storm doors and 
interior painting. 

Anticipated problems for the coming year include replacing worn-out linoleum floor cover- 
ings in a number of kitchens and bathrooms, one new sidewalk, and continued maintenance of steps, 
sidewalks and the heating system. 

Payment to the Town of Andover in lieu of taxes, for the year 1963, was $1, 876. 00. 

The Commonwealth Contribution for the current fiscal year was $8,650.00. 

There are 56 units in this project, presently housing 243 persons--108 adults and 135 child- 
ren. The average monthly rental is $53.08, plus an average monthly utility charge of $18. 68. 

The established annual income limit, regulated by the State Housing Board, is: for families 
with one or less minor dependent, $4, 500; two minor dependents, $4, 700; three or more minor 
dependents , $4,900. 

Income allowed for continued occupancy: for families with one or less minor dependents, 
$5,000; two minor dependents, $5,200; three or more minor dependents, $5,400. 

Shelter rent is based on total family income. Families with one child, 18%; two children 16%; 
three children 14%; for each dependent child in excess of three, $200 is deducted from total family 
income. 

Sixteen new families have moved into the project and nine families have moved within the 
project during the year. Since the project's opening, in 1950, a total of 224 vacancies have been 
filled. The majority of families, moving from the project, have either bought houses or moved out 
of the town. 



49 



HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY 

Maintenance work completed under contract, for this project, was concrete repairs, $225 
and a prime coat of paint on shingles, $1, 000. 

Anticipated maintenance problems for the coming year are exterior painting and continued 
maintenance of steps and platforms. 

The Commonwealth Contribution for the year 1963 was $12,625.00. 

This project is comprised of 40 dwelling units, a recreation hall and 2 laundry rooms, and 
is presently housing 48 persons. The average monthly rental, including all utilities, is $50. 

The yearly income limits for admission are: for one person, 65 years of age or older, 
$2, 500; two persons, 65 years of age or older, $3, 000. 

The yearly income limits for continued occupancy are: for one person, $3, 125; two persons, 
$3,750. 

No vacancies have occured in the project this year. 

The members of the Andover Housing Authority, as of December 31, 1963, are as follows: 

David MacDonald, Jr., Chairman 
Harold E. Coleman, Vice Chairman 
Thomas R. Wallace, Treasurer 
Winston A. Blake, Assistant Treasurer 
Thomas P. Eldred, Assistant Secretary 

James E. Manning, Secretary and Executive Director 

Balance sheets reporting the assets and liabilities of Projects 200-1 and 667-1, for the 
period ending December 31, 1963, follow. 

JAMES E. MANNING 
Executive Director 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
PROJECT 200-1 

BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1963 

Assets 

Cash - Andover Savings Bank $ 40,226.98 
Cash - Essex Savings Bank 2,518.66 

Cash - Administration Fund 6,422.80 

Cash - Petty Cash 25.00 $ 49,193.44 

Accounts Receivable - Tenants 643.00 

Debt Service Fund 3,377.41 

Investments - U.S. Treasury Bonds @ 3 3/4% 15,000.00 

Investments - Debt Service Trust Fund @ 3-5/8% 1,000.00 

Debt Service Trust Fund 398.55 

Prepaid Insurance 2,126.17 

Development Cost 626,000.00 

Less Development Cost Liquidation 123,000.00 503,000.00 

Total Assests $574,738.57 

50 



Liabilities, Reserves & Surplus 



Liabilities 

Matured Interest & Principal 
State Aid Unapplied 
Tenants' Security Deposits 
Prepaid Rents 

Bonds Authorized 

Less Bonds Retired 

Reserves 

Debt service Reserve 
Unamortized Bond Premium 
Reduction of Annual Contribution 
Operating Reserves 

Surplus 

Total Liabilities, Reserves & Surplus 



$ 12,419.86 

2, 162.50 

1,020.00 

145.50 

626,000.00 
123,000.00 



23, 393.89 
1, 398. 55 
1,750.00 

20,587.82 



$ 15,747.86 
503,000.00 



47, 130.26 

8,860.45 

$574,738.57 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
PROJECT 667-1 

BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1963 



Assets 



Cash - Andover Savings Bank 
Cash - Administration Fund 
Prepaid Insurance 

Development Cost 

Less Development Cost Liquidation 
Matured Interest and Principal 

Total Assets 



8,053. 33 
2,354.61 



505,000.00 
20,000.00 



$ 10,407.94 
2,579.93 



485,000.00 
12.31 

$498,000. 18 



Liabilities, Reserves & Surplus 



Liabilities 

Notes Authorized 

Less Notes Retired 
Prepaid Rents 

Reserves 

Debt Service Reserve 
Operating Reserve 

Surplus 

Total Liabilities, Reserves & Surplus 



$505,000.00 
20,000.00 



$485,000.00 
165.50 



3,366.00 
6,987. 39 

2,481.29 

$498,000. 18 



51 



Board Of Health Nurse And Agent 



We submit herewith a brief resume of the activities of the Board of Health for the year 1963; 



The following contagious diseases were reported 
to this office: 





1963 


1962 


1961 


Dog Bites 


64 


62 


41 


Tuberculosis 


4 


2 


2 


Scarlet Fever 


30 


22 


8 


Chicken Pox 


37 


304 


64 


Whooping Cough 


1 


1 


11 


Measles 


5 


183 


284 


Mumps 


98 


6 


13 


Syphilis 








4 


Infectious Hepatitis 


5 


3 


4 


Meningitis Influenzal 





1 


1 


Meningitis Aseptic 








1 


Meningitis Meningoccocal 


1 








German Measles 


32 


38 


19 


Gonorrhea 





1 


1 


Rabbit Bite 


1 









The following licenses were granted and a total 
of $3444. 50 in receipts for the same has been 
turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Septic Tank Permits 156 

Maintenance of Piggeries 10 
Agencies Giving Day Care to Children 

Under Seven 4 

Mfg. of Ice Cream & Frozen Desserts 6 

Milk 84 

Oleo 34 

Pasteurization of Milk 4 

Camps 1 

Garbage & Refuse 24 

Swimming Pool 8 

Motel 1 

Massage 4 

Funeral Director 7 

Farm Labor Camps 5 

Plumbing Permits 253 

Gas Permits 69 

An X-ray Mobile Unit, sponsored by Essex County TB Association, was stationed at the 
Square and Compass Club and free chest X-rays were available to the public. Approximately 1000 
individuals were x-rayed, representing an average of 131 x-rays per hour, which established a new 
record in community programs. 

In 1963 there were 5 patients from Andover admitted to the TB Hospital. This represents 
the highest incidence of admissions during the past 6 years. 

Over 4000 children under 18 years of age received Type I, II, and III Sabin oral polio vaccine 
at Public Clinics held in Central School Gym in January, March and May. The local Board received 
the vaccine from the State Department of Health and the program was carried out with the assistance 

of many volunteers. 

Each year, a greater number of new 
homes requiring individual sewage facilities are 
being constructed. All these systems are care- 
fully reviewed and inspected by a representative 
of the Health Department before a permit for use 
is issued. With the adoption of the State Sanita- 
ry Code, the requirements are becoming more 
uniform for both individual systems and subdi- 
vision acceptance. 




Organizing for the Chest X-Ray Mobile Unit 



New laws relative to Health requirements 
under the Sanitary Code are received periodi- 
cally during the year. 



52 



Other inspectional programs covering food establishments, milk plants, dairy barns, milk 
trucks, bathing water, Scout Camps, piggeries, housing for transient laborers, nursing homes, 
rest homes, and Day Nurseries, have continued without change. All complaints were investigated 
and processed. 

Field visits, including case findings were made on all patients and contacts of communicable 
diseases. Premature Babies and Crippled Children program was carried on as usual. 

The annual rabies clinic was held on two successive Saturdays in April and a total of 475 
dogs were inoculated. 

ELIZABETH NADEAU, R.N. 
Health Agent 



53 



Animal Inspector 



The following report is submitted by the Animal Inspector for the year ending December 31, 



Number of cattle inspected: 

Registered 92 

Grade 90 



Number of sheep inspected 
Number of horses inspected 
Number of goats inspected 
Number of swine inspected 
Number of barns inspected (dairy) 12 
Number of dogs quarantined 51 

Number of dogs with Rabies 



182 
19 
74 
3 

993 




WORRIED LASS - Gayle Roma holds her pet, Taffy, while Dr. 
Richard Lindsay gives him a shot of anti-rabies serum, during the 
clinic. Gayle was more visibly upset than was her four-footed 
friend, at the thought of how it might hurt. 



RICHARD D. LINDSAY, D. V. M. 
Animal Inspector 




Dog Officer 



Complaints investigated 11 

Dogs reported missing 75 

Strays cared for 23 
Dogs turned over to Havard Medical School 

Animal Research Center 16 

Lost dogs returned to owners 7 

Dead dogs disposed of 12 



MARTIN T. CAUGHEY, Jr. 



54 



Office Of Veteran's Service 



Under Chapter 115, General Laws of Massachusetts, we are assisting, financially, a num- 
ber of dependent parents, widows of veterans and, when necessary, veterans who are in need 
because of old age, sickness or unemployment. 

An ever increasing number of insurance, pension, compensation and hospitalization claims 
are being processed because of the closing of the Lawrence Veterans Administration Office. The 
other varied services of this Department are enumerated below. 



Allotments and 


Allowances 


178 


Burials 




28 


Civil Service 




21 


Compensation 




20 


Education 




31 


Employment 




46 


Home Loans 




25 


Housing 




40 


Hospital Care 




90 


Insurance 




52 


Legal 




14 


Medical and Dental 


67 


Miscellaneous Categories 


713 


Pensions 




91 


Photostats of D 


ischarges, 


737 


Statistics and R 


ecords 




Social Security 




42 


Taxes 




60 


VA Financial Statements 


95 


Veterans' Bene 


fits 


54 


Vital Statistics 




154 




1963 Municipal Employee of the Year Award to Frank Markey 
- Vets. Service Agent 



Veterans deaths during the year totaled 28 as listed below. 

World War One 18 World War Two 9 Korean Conflict 1 

As newly appointed Veterans' Agent for the Town, I would like to express my appreciation 
for the gracious manner in which all of the officials and employees of the town hall assisted in the 
orderly transition of this Department from the capable hands of Mr. Francis P. Markey to my own. 
The unstinting cooperation of Mr. Markey has resulted in a continuation of the policies of my pre- 
decessor of complete service to the veterans and servicemen of Andover, their widows, orphans 
and dependent parents. 

Sincere thanks to the local Veterans Organizations, Andover Red Cross, Police Department, 
Fire Department, Church and Charitable Groups, the Selectmen and the Town Manager for their 
assistance and cooperation. 



ELMER S.OBER, Agent 
Veterans' Service Office 



55 



Recreation Department 



The Andover Recreation Department submits the following report for the first full year of 
operation ending December 31, 1963. 

GENERAL AIM: In accordance with accepted Recreation practices, the primary aim of the Recrea- 
tion Department is "to make available, areas and facilities suitable to the leisure time needs of the 
people of the Community. These areas and facilities to be developed and maintained in an efficient 
and economical manner in order that local groups and individuals may use them to develop their own 
activities through guidance by the Recreation Department. " 

ANDOVER RECREATION PARK: 
POMP'S SWIMMING AREA: 



DEVELOPMENT: The swimming area underwent major improvements. The beach was extended 

for swimming and sun bathing. Supervision of the sun- 
bathing and non-swimmer areas were made considerably 
more effective because of this. Expansion was made 
possible through purchase of the adjoining Manning Pro- 
perty. The Bath House was remodeled; the bath house, 
guard house and concession stand painted. An enlarged 
parking area made it possible to accommodate parking 
at all times with the exception of one Sunday. Lockers 
were also installed for the convenience of bathers. 

TRAINING: Mr. Wilbur Hixon took charge of the swim- 
ming area for the first time this year. Special emphasis 
was put on preventive safety because of the imminent 
danger of retrieving a victim from the water which is not 
clear. All lifeguards were trained in water safety and 
swimming and diving, by our staff or by an accredited 
aquatic school. This year, three guards were sent to the 
- Central Playground - Red Cross Aquatic School. 

A Pie Eating Contest Brings Lots of Smiles 

PROGRAM: A well-rounded program of swimming and 

diving instruction, lifesaving, general swimming and special events helped maintain good attendance 

during the Season. 




HIGHLIGHTS: Andover played host to North Andover and Methuen this year for the " Little Three 
Swim Meet". Band Concerts, the Playground Swim Meet and outings stimulated much interest 
throughout the Summer. 

PICNIC AREA: 

DEVELOPMENT: Acquisition of Camp Sargent or Camp Olympia made it possible to expand our 
Recreation Facilities. In late April two high school boys were hired to start cleaning the area. 
Two small buildings, badly in need of repair, were removed along with a considerable amount of 
other debris. An outing area was then developed with a barbeque pit and eight Picnic Tables. Be- 
cause of an insufficient maintenance staff and a busy schedule, there was no further development 
during the summer. 



56 



In September the Junior Chamber of Commerce had a work bee, cleaning the dining hall. 
Shortly after this, a part-time maintenance man was hired. With his assistance, several additional 
work bees were organized. By the end of the year, an equivalent of $2, 000 worth of labor and ma- 
terials had been donated through private sources. This included cleaning, painting, repairing and 
rewiring of the building. It also included partial development of a sliding and ice skating area. 

A plan for development of the entire area was drawn up by the Director of Recreation and is 
on file in his office. This plan is projected over a ten to fifteen year period. Estimate of the im- 
mediate needs has been made and distributed to those groups and individuals showing an interest in 
the project. 

PROGRAM: Although no formal program was developed for the area, many organizations used the 
facilities for meetings and outings. These included Church groups, clubs and youth groups. High- 
lighting the season was a Boy Scout Camporee in which all Andover and North Andover units partici- 
pated. 

PLAYGROUNDS: 

DEVELOPMENT: A concerted effort was made this year to maintain and improve all playgrounds. 
The part-time maintenance crew did much to achieve this end. Most of the maintenance program 
consisted of repair and painting of existing equipment and facilities. In addition, Basketball and 
Tennis Courts were set up at Central. 

TRAINING: Supervisors were again sent to a state-wide training conference at the University of 
Massachusetts in Amherst. This and additional information was then used as a basis for a week- 
long training program for the entire staff. This approach showed dividends by developing partici- 
pant interest earlier in the season and maintaining a higher interest throughout the summer. 

PROGRAM: A balance in programming was achieved by planning and developing activities aimed at 
varied interests. These included arts and crafts, Special Events and Tournaments, Active games 
and Sports and Music. 

HIGHLIGHTS: Interest was maintained throughout the season by developing special events related to 
weekly "Themes". These themes included hobbys, sports, dolls, crafts, parades and a circus. 
There were also weekly tournaments, a playground swim meet, field day, picnics and the traditional 
outing to Canobie Lake Park. 

ICE RINKS: Because of the development of a maintenance program, it was possible to put more em- 
phasis on maintaining the ice rink at the Central Playstead and in Ballardvale. A start was also 
made toward developing additional rinks in the newly acquired park. 

COORDINATED PROGRAM: In conjunction with the Recreation Program a Community Council for 
Recreation was established. Headed by Mr. Robert Mclntyre, Mrs. Thomas Dye, Dr. Douglas Dunbar 
and Mr. Richard Neal, the Council worked toward coordinating all related recreation activities. 
During November they released a Directory-Calendar in which most of the Town's Clubs and Organi- 
zations were listed. This booklet was distributed through the Banks and the Library. Publishing of 
the book was done in cooperation with the Andover Board of Trade. Based upon the Directory, the 
Recreation Department was able to submit a weekly calendar to the newspaper. It also served as a 
guide to help eliminate duplication of activities for any organizations wishing to avail itself of the 
service. 

Many organizations requested assistance of the Recreation Department. Traditionally, 
equipment has been loaned to them in consideration that they are supplying supervision that would 
normally be charged to the Town. The various sports leagues and youth service organizations are 
therefore to be commended for their interest and assistance to the Town. It would be impossible to 
note every volunteer and organization that donated supervision for the tens of thousand of partici- 
pant hours of programs enjoyed bv the townspeople. 



57 



FUTURE PLANS: Toward the end of the year, plans were formulated to initiate a self-sustaining 
Adult Education program. This program is to begin toward the middle of January 1964. 

Many people are becoming increasingly concerned about the shortage of meeting halls, ball 
diamonds, ice skating rinks, off-street sliding areas and equipped playgrounds. In view of this, 
work has been started to develop the newly acquired Recreation Park into a "Family Recreation 
Area". Although plans have been drawn up and some work done, the Recreation Department must 
solicit private groups to establish basic necessities in the area. This includes winterizing the ex- 
isting building and installing sanitary facilities. It also means developing a parking lot and recrea- 
tion areas that can be used for the entire year. Without help from private clubs, groups and indivi- 
duals, development of these needs must be postponed until sufficient funds can be made available 
through the budget. 

With the increase of Recreation areas, Facilities and Equipment, there is an increased need 
for a full-time maintenance program. Much must be done to improve and develop all areas. Be- 
cause of this, plans are now under way to provide the necessary equipment and manpower for the 
program. This will assure those persons who help in the development, that their contributions will 
be preserved. It will also assure the public of facilities which they can use with pride. Several 
groups and individuals have already contributed toward the development of the Recreation Park. 
They include the Junior Chamber of Commerce, Andover Board of Trade, Teen Center Boards, 
Groups from Phillips and Abbot Academies, the Electric and Telephone Companies, C. Lincoln Giles, 
Charles Hill and David Coffman. Town Departments have also helped and encouraged the develop- 
ment. 

LESLIE BARTOW, Director 



58 



Police Department 



The Andover Police Department hereby submits a summary of activities for the year ending 
December 31, 1963. 



Miscellaneous complaints received and investigated 

Summons served for out-of-town police 

Automobiles stolen in Andover 

Automobiles recovered in Andover 

Bicycles stolen in Andover 

Bicycles recovered in Andover 

Breaks in camps and dwellings 

Breaks in business establishments 

Doors in business establishments found open and secured 

Lost children located 

Runaway children returned to parents and institutions 

Dogs killed by automobiles 

Dogs injured by automobiles 

Street lights reported out 

Dwellings inspected while owners away 

Lost articles returned to owners 

Summons served 

Street conditions reported to Highway Department 

Persons taken to Danvers State Hospital 

Persons taken to hospital in police cruisers 

Arrests made for out-of-town police 

Suicides 

Attempted suicide 

Dog bites 



1908 

157 

9 

11 

21 

19 

30 

13 

40 

25 

6 

22 

54 

213 

623 

27 

101 

65 

7 

75 

8 

3 

1 

47 



ARRESTS AND CHARGES 



Drunkenness 

Operating under the influence of liquor 

Operating to endanger 

Leaving scene after injury to person 

Operating without license 

Operating after revocation of license 

Operating after suspension of license 



59 
8 
3 

1 
1 
1 
5 



First Aid Training - All officers are required to maintain up-tp-date 
Auxiliary Police gather at Sportsman's Club for target practice ■, Red Cross Certificates in such training. 




59 



Stop sign violations 19 

Speeding 30 

Operating unregistered motor vehicle 2 

Operating uninsured motor vehicle 2 

Failure to stop for traffic signal 2 

No inspection sticker 2 

Passing over solid line 1 
Operating of motor vehicle giving false name 1 

Parking violations 71 

Assault and battery 1 

Breaking and entering 7 

Delinquent child 17 

Stubborn child 1 

Larceny 18 

Morals charge 5 

Non-support 1 

Procuring liquor for minor 1 

Auto theft 1 

Unlawful use of motor vehicles 1 

Truancy 2 

Bomb hoax 1 

Disturbing the peace 28 

Not restraining dog 1 

Armed robbery 1 

Malicious damage to property 3 

Unlawful possession of firearms 1 

Hunting without license 2 




Chief Nicoll and Officer Howard, with canine 
being trained to serve with Andover's Police 
Force. 



DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Convictions in District Court 

Adjudications in Juvenile Court 

Placed on file 

Probation 

Released by Probation Officer 

Dismissed 

Sentenced to House of Correction 

Sentenced to Concord Reformatory 

Committed to Youth Service Board 

Sentenced to Bridgewater Correctional Institute 

Held for Grand Jury 

Continued for disposition 

Sentenced to Women's Reformatory 

Appealed 

Amount of fines paid 



188 

12 

13 

8 

43 

19 

14 

1 

11 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

$2375.00 



In 1963 there were 332 reportable accidents in Andover. This is a decrease of 3 over 1962. 
The accidents were as follows: 

Fatal Personal Injury 146 

Property damage 173 Pedestrian 8 

Bicycle -Auto 5 

During the year 1963, there were 430 motor vehicle violations reported to the Registry of 
Motor Vehicles, and 5,796 parking violation tags were issued. 

The police cards travelled 217,489 miles in 1963. 

DAVID L. NICOLL 
Chief of Police 



60 






Fire Department 



' > " -* 


L 


"r— i ■■•■-- — »v-»^r?v » 1 t 


t^l';, 


w ^X'^r 


■"■ 



The 1963 report of the Fire Department is submitted 
herewith. 

SERVICE: 1,868 calls for service were answered 
during 1963. We had 8 false alarms which were 
sounded due to honest mistakes and a few caused by- 
suspected mischievousness . Mutual aid responses 
to neighboring communities were made 9 times. 

The estimated loss from fire of all types 
amounted to approximately $160,240,21, represen- 
ting for the most part the actual loss settlement on 
property involved in fires which were reported to the 
Fire Department. The assessed valuation of proper- 
ties involved was approximately $2,332,695.00. 

The ambulance answered 797 calls for service Firemen battle Howard Johnson's fire in blizzard. 

of which 81 were for non-resident use. 73 non- 
residents were billed $10.00 each for this service and 

8 non-residents were billed $25.00 for trips which involved transportation to Boston hospitals, 
making a total of $930. 00 which was paid to the Town Treasurer. 

FIRE PREVENTION: Fuel oil installation permits and inspections of installations totaled 257. Fees 
were collected for 159 permits for the storage of oil at 50£ each, making a total of $79. 50 which was 
turned over to the Town Treasurer. 33 Liquified Petroleum Gas Installations were inspected and 
approved according to State Regulations. 44 Permits for the use of dynamite were issued in accord- 
ance with State Statutes and Regulations for the protection of the public. 

Approximately 4, 700 permits were issued for open air fires when weather conditions warran- 
ted. Over 900 inspections including public schools, private schools, mercantile, industrial and 
multiple dwelling buildings of which we are cognizant, were carried out to the extent provided by law 
and in each instance a report was sent to the owners, occupants and proper authorities concerning 
the conditions existing at the time of inspection. Recommendations and remedial action were sugges- 
ted or ordered according to law for the safety of the public. 

56 Fire Drills required by State regulations were carried out and witnessed in public and pri- 
vate schools during 1963. 

Nursing homes, rest homes and hospitals were inspected quarterly as required by State 
Statutes and results sent to management and the State Department of Public Health. Personal notifi- 
cation by in-service companies was made to all mercantile establishments concerning the use of 
flammable decorations in stores and places of assembly. 

Copies of rules and regulations promulgated by the Board of Fire Prevention Rules and Regu- 
lations of the Department of Public Safety were sent to authorities of schools throughout town explain- 
ing their responsibilities for the planning and operation of an evacuation system for use during fire 
drills or other emergencies requiring the evacuation of students and employees of a school building. 

Persons in charge, or owners, of gasoline service stations, garages, repair shops or places 
where gasoline is being used or dispensed for sale were advised regarding the requirements of State 
regulations concerning smoking in or about such areas. 



61 



Again this year, an inspector gave a class on Fire Prevention and action that should be taken 
in case of fire to the Baby Sitters' Class held in the Junior High School. 

The cooperation of the Building, Wiring, Gas and Health Inspectors of the Town adds im- 
measurably to the success of the Fire Department's fire prevention activities. 

PERSONNEL: There are 40 permanent members and a call force of 5 members in the Fire Depart- 
ment. Permanent members work 48 hours every week since last March when the voters favored this 
work week. 

APPARATUS: The Central Fire Station garages two pumpers, an aerial ladder, forest fire truck, 
ambulance, Chief's car, rescue boat and trailer, a fire alarm maintenance trailer and a Jeep utility 
pick-up truck. 

The Ballardvale Station garages one pumper, a rescue boat and trailer, and a 1937 reserve 
pumper used for fill-in purposes if other pumpers are out of service for any reason. 

Our aerial ladder truck (1940) will be 25 years old next year and by rating standards will be 
at its limit for receiving credit. Rating Bureau practices usually give credit for an aerial up to 25 
years and for pumping units up to 20 years service. We have a 1945 500-gallon per minute pumping 
unit in Ballardvale which will reach the 20 year point by next year. Both units have been included in 
one capital expenditure outlay study which the town paid for, plus the replacement of the Forest Fire 
truck which was scheduled for last year. This year's budget as presented to the Town Manager will 
again include the replacement of that vehicle. 

FIRE ALARM: Replacement of out-dated street boxes at the rate of 6 per year is still in progress and 
the time is approaching when all street boxes belonging to the Town will be of the type which afford 
ground return signals in the event of broken circuits due to storms or accidents. The out-date (1887) 
main fire alarm panel and other Central Station equipment (rewired in 1924 for alternating current) 
is definitely in need of replacement and an item in the 1965 Fire Department budget for this work will 
appear for action. The work, which is required in connection with the construction of Route 495 and 
which is reimbursable, is awaiting the final bridge and road completion before we can replace our 
system in this section of town. Public schools and St. Augustine 's Parochial School are connected to 
our system by automatic detection devices withing the buildings which, when properly working and 
maintained, will signal a condition of fire, thereby tripping the master fire alarm box on the buildings 
sending us an automatic alarm of fire for that location. It is hoped that the new Pike School will com- 
plete their installation and tie in with our system in the same manner. 

More industrial operations are protecting their property by supervising sprinkler systems or 
detection systems in the same manner. 

We maintain in the vicinity of 50 miles of aerial wiring and 12 miles of underground cable. 
A section of underground cable between Shawsheen Village and the Wood Estate on North Main Street 
must be replaced this year due to conditions beyond our control which cause a continual grounding of 
that circuit and the resulting possibility of faulty operation due to ground water throughout this area. 

BUILDINGS: The Central Fire Station will be surveyed professionally for suggestions in connection 
with alleviating a floor condition which increases with time. A cement cover which was poured over 
an old wooden floor (horse-and-carriage flooring) is continually moving due to the weight of present 
day vehicles. This cement cover is full of open cracks and is breaking up in sections. The conti- 
nuous washing and wetting of this floor and the resulting seepage certainly must be taking its toll in 
structural efficiency. It is hoped that some answer can be obtained to this problem. This building 
will receive a complete painting on the interior by on-duty members during 1964. The Ballardvale 
station will also be painted by on-duty members and it is hoped that bids can be obtained during the 
coming year for the repair and exterior painting of this building. 



62 



Should the relocation of the Police Department become a reality, it is hoped that a separate 
inter-communication system or private line telephone can be installed between the Fire Department 
and the Police Department at the time so that the cooperative operations which exist now during am- 
bulance and fire emergencies can be continued. 

CONCLUSION: I wish to thank the Town Manager and the various departments of the town for their 
cooperation during the year. I should also like to thank the members of the Fire Department for 
their cooperation and efficient performance of their duties. 

HENRY L. HILTON, Chief 
Andover Fire Department 




Civil Defense Agency 



The following items have been or are being completed: 

IN COMMUNICATIONS - The control center is now completed in the Town Hall basement and has 
already been in active service. Three new mobile units have been added to the existing net of radio 
facilities, making a total of 33 available units in an emergency. A new G-50 Base Transceiver has 
been installed and is now in operation at the Town Hall. In addition, the Raytheon Manufacturing 
Company has purchased a new radio for tie-in communications with the RACES group. The Red 
Cross has purchased a similar unit in order to be in communication with the Civil Defense authori- 
ties. The Communications group, under the direction of Mr. Alex Ritchie, is meeting, as in the 
past, on a weekly basis. This unit has been used several times during the past year and is on a 
Ready Stand-By basis. The Auxiliary Police Unit, under the direction of Mr. Winston Briggs, has, 
as of the first of the year, donated to the Town of Andover, some 4150 man hours. This unit meets 
on a monthly basis and is on a Ready Stand-By Basis. The Auxiliary Fire Department is being or- 
ganized by the previous Civil Defense Director, Lee Noyes. Chief Hilton has offered this unit a 
vehicle for training purposes. This unit will be in operation sometime in 1964. The Hospital Unit, 
now in storage, has been checked and brought up to date. The Rescue Unit vehicle is now stored 
under cover on the Shaw Estate Property. The unit now numbers 17 and is on a regular training 
schedule. 

The Fail-Out Shelter program, in accordance with Phase 2, has been completed. This gives 
the town 24, 000 useable spaces. In addition, spaces have been stocked with 24, 000 units of supplies. 
One unit gives one person 14 days of water, food, medical supplies and sanitation supplies. A list 
of the buildings and their stockings will be made available sometime during the month of February 
1964. 

I wish to thank the above groups and Col. Joseph Cove, 15 Rock Ridge Road, Mrs. Peter 
O'Connor, 51 Magnolia Avenue, and Miss Alice Dunn, teacher at West School for making this past 
year a success in Civil Defense. 

BURTON B. BATCHELLER 
Director of Civil Defense 

63 



Department Of Public Works 




Ground Breaking Ceremony - Rogers Brook 



Pipe to Harness Rogers Brook - Flood Waters 



The subdivisions under the Department of Public Works number 15 and in addition numerous 
capital expenditure articles are voted at Town Meeting on water, sewer, drainage and highways. 
These are planned and executed either under contract or by Town forces. 

The budget expenses of the above subdivisions totalled $311,700 in 1963 of which Street 
Lighting, Telephone, Gas & Electricity, Fair Trade Items, Water Meters, Hydrants, State pur- 
chasing requirements and miscellaneous items accounted for $95,000. Bids were received and 
awarded on all possible purchases in the amount of $172,000. Small equipment purchases, spe- 
cialized items which can only be purchased from a single source, repairs and emergency purchases 
account for another $ 10, 000. 

EMPLOYEES 



1 Engineer 

1 Office Manager 

1 Engineering Aide (Part Time) 

3 Working Foremen 

4 Tree Climbers 
8 Truck Drivers 



2 Mack Dump Trucks 

To Replace 2 1956 Fords 

3 Dodge Pick-up Trucks 

1-New 

1-To replace 1953 Ford 

1-To replace I960 Dodge 

Case Loader 
To replace 1961 International 
Loader 



3 Superintendents 

3 Clerks 

5 Foremen 

9 Heavy Equipment Operators 

5 Maintenance Men 

12 Laborers 



NEW EQUIPMENT - 1963 

Locke Mower 



13, 900. 00 
5,971. 77 



9,450. 00 



Assigned Frequency Radio 4, 000. 00 

Hook-up Base Station, Console 
and 4 car receivers & transmitters 



Toro Lawn Mower 

B 100 Tapping Machine 

Wachs Hydrant Power Drive 

2 Homelite Saws 

To replace 2 I960 Saws 

Bombardier Sidewalk Plow 

13 Foot Anderson Plow 

Portable Battery Charger 



1, 357. 00 
140. 00 
333. 00 
608. 00 
351. 23 

4,920. 00 

1, 182. 70 

150. 00 



64 



HIGHWAY 

Sidewalks were constructed of type D-13 and type I Bituminous material on the following 
streets: Woburn Street from South School to Charlotte Drive; Main Street from Punchard Avenue to 
Morton Street; Chestnut Street from Main to Central Street; both sides of Chestnut Street from Bart- 
let Street to Whittier Street; Walnut Ave. from High Street the entire length of hottop sidewalk; Love- 
joy Road from Dascomb Road, a distance of some 4000'. Some of the cement slabs in Shawsheen 
Village were repaired 

Concrete post was purchased to replace many broken ones on Salem Street, Beacon Street, 
Lowell Street and River Road. 

Walnut Avenue, Morton Street, Dale Street, Riverina Road, Sunset Rock Road and River Road 
from Route 93 to the North School, a distance of 900' were resurfaced with 2 course type I Bitumi- 
nous concrete. All catch basins and grates were raised to the proper heights. 

This project ^as done by the Highway Department. 

Six catch basins were constructed on River Road and 650' of 24" cement pipe laid. One catch 
basin "/as constructed on Lowell Junction Road. One catch basin was constructed on Henderson 
Avenue and Strawberry Hill Road, and 60' of 12" cement pipe laid, one catch basin and 90' of 12" 
pipe laid on Central Street, 2 catch basins and 200' of 12" cement pipe laid on Summer Street. 

The following road surfaces were treated with asphalt and honed: 

Abbot St. , Argilla Rd. , Argyle St. , Arundel St. , Bailey Rd. , Bancroft Rd. , Beacon St. , Bellevue 
Rd. , Carmel Rd. , Chandler Circle, Chester St. , Dufton Rd. , Flint Circle, Foster Circle, Gardner 
Ave. , George St. , Gould Rd. , Greenwood Rd. , Haggetts Pond Rd. , High Plain Rd. , High St. , 
Juniper Rd. , Kenilworth St. , Lincoln Circle, Linwood St. , Magnolia Ave. , North St. , Oak St. , 
Orchard St. , Oriole Drive, Pasho St. , Poor St. , Railroad Ave. , Reservation Road, Riverina Rd. , 
Salem St. , Shirley Rd. , Strawberry Hill Rd. , Tewksbury St. , West Parish Acres, William St. , 
Woodland Rd. , Yale Rd. , and York St. 

A total of 93, 978 gallons of asphalt was used. 




Town now manufacturers its own street signs. 
Street sign replacement program started in 1963. 



65 



STREET LIGHTING 

The following tabulation shows the amount of money that will be required in 1964 to cover 
costs of street lights installed as of December 31, 1963: 



Number 

835 
31 
56 
60 
50 

1 
21 
69 
37 
12 

2 



1, 000 

1, 000 

2, 500 
1, 000 

3, 500 
3, 500 
7, 000 

21, 000 
21,000 
60, 000 
Floodli 



lumen o. h. 
lumen o. h 
lumen o, h. 
lumen u. g. 
lumen o. h. 
lumen u. g. 
vapor o. h. 
vapor o. h. 
vapor u. g. 
vapor o. h. 
ghts 



Unit 
Price 

$18. 

25. 

28. 

38. 

40. 

60. 

55. 
100. 
120. 
210. 

95. 



Annual 


( 


Cost 


$15, 


, 030. 




775. 


1, 


, 568. 


2, 


, 280. 


2, 


000 




60. 


1, 


155. 


6, 


900. 


4, 


440. 


2, 


520. 




190. 



36,918. 



Surveys Completed for 1964 



Belle vue Road 
Burnham Road 
Cutler Road 
Greenwood Road 
North Street 



Brown Street 
Charlotte Drive 
Cyr Circle 
Hidden R oad 
Railroad Avenue 



1, 000. 



PARKS 



$37,918. 



There are two regular size diamonds at the Central Playstead, one regular size diamond at 
V'oburn Street Playground, siv Little League Fields, two at Central, two at Woburn Street Play- 
ground, and two in the rear of the West Center School. 

Portable bleachers are erected at the Little League Field on the Woburn Street Playground 
and at the Central Little League Field, also portable bleachers are erected at the Central area for 
the football field. 

Fertilizer was applied in the Spring on both the Park and Playstead areas. These two areas 
were rolled by the Park Department. 

BRIDGES 



The bridges under control of the Department of Public Works were inspected many times 
during the year, one on Stevens Street, one on Central Street, and one on Andover Street in Ballard- 
vale . 

HIGHWAY 
The snowfall for the year 1963 was as follows: 



January 
February 



9. 27 inches 
5.26 



March 
December 



13. 06 inches 
23.60 



Total snowfall 51. 19 

66 



WATER SYSTEM 

In 1963 under the Capital Expenditure program 2823' of 12" main were laid cross country from 
Prospect Hill Reservoir to Salem Street; 1150' of 12" on Cross Street; and 3475' of 10" on South Main 
Street from Wildwood Road to Rocky Hill Road. 

In various subdivisions the following lines were added: 

8" 11,500' 

6" 4,310' 

44 hydrants were also added. 
Under contract: 

Cross Country 

Salem St. to Reservoir 
Cross St. 
South Main St. 

Subdivisions 

Farwood Forest 

Rolling Green 
Wood Ridge Trust 

Downing North Acres 
DeVries 

Willow Way 
Carriage Hill 

Regent Homes 
Lillian Terrace 
Washington Apartments 

Bannister Road 

Off Railroad Avenue 

Hall 



2823' 


12' 


1 hydrant 


1150' 


12' 


2 


3475' 


10' 





2090' 


8' 


5 hydrants 


871 


6' 




2265' 


8' 


4 


2000* 


8' 


9 


500' 


6- 




1888' 


8' 


2 


650' 


8' 


4 


793' 


6' 




309' 


6' 


• 1 


660' 


6' 


2 


400' 


12' 




1765' 


8' 


5 


917' 


6' 


1 


762' 


8' 


2 


94' 


6' 




662' 


8' 


■ 2 


146' 


6' 


1 


180' 


8' 





Maintenance: 



18 hydrant repairs 

14 repaired watermains 

Reconditioned the suction line at Haggetts Pond 

322 new house meters were installed. 

45 old meters were repaired 

27 field meters were taken out and reinstalled 

432 special readings were taken in connection with property 

sales and special services 
1000 special calls were tabulated 



67 



1963 Water Pumping Report 







ABBOT 


BALLARD VALE 


WOOD 


HAGGETTS 




MONTH 




WELL 


WELLS 


HILL 


POND 


TOTAL 


January- 




8,950,000 


15,840,000 


3,962,000 


35,210,000 


63,962,000 


February 




7,930,000 


14,350,000 


4, 111,000 


33, 330,000 


59,721,000 


March 




6,300,000 


15,566,000 


4,498,000 


38, 590,000 


64,954,000 


April 






14,734,000 


4,714,000 


47, 830,000 


67,278,000 


May 






18,080,000 


5, 312, 000 


52, 820,000 


76,212,000 


June 






19, 560,000 


7,737,000 


69,060,000 


96, 357,000 


July 






27,070,000 


9,750,000 


64,340, 000 


101, 160,000 


August 




10, 300,000 


15, 120,000 


6,984,000 


45, 370,000 


77,774,000 


September 




10,730,000 


13,830,000 


6,730,000 


40, 710,000 


72,000,000 


October 




10,480, 000 


17, 830,000 


6, 308,000 


37,300,000 


71,918,000 


November 




9, 140,000 


25,950,000 


4,718.000 


15, 560, 000 


55, 368,000 


December 




8, 320,000 


26,280,000 


5, 020, 000 


15,440,000 


55,060,000 






72, 150,000 


224,210,000 


69,844,000 


495, 560,000 


861,764,000 


Average M. G, 


D. 2, 


360,000 








Minimum '. 


Daily Pumping 


1, 386,000 - 


December 22 






Maximum 


Daily Pumping 


5,247,000 - 


July 27 







(Water) 

Bids were received for painting Prospect Hill Reservoir and due to weather conditions and 
heavy use this work was held over to 1964. 

Under 495 construction temporary lines were laid on Greenwood Road and Beacon Street 
crossings and South Union Street. Permanent installations were on Chandler Road and Beacon Street. 

Hydrants and gate boxes were adjusted under chapter 90 construction. 

10 main taps were made for subdividers. 

SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

Under Sewer the main development was the start of the Federal Aid project in December. 
Considerable advance work was done by the Department. 

Route 495 construction included 4537' of 36" prestressed concrete force main from Andover 
to Winthrop Avenue. A new sewer was laid on Topping Road, through the connector road to Walker 
Avenue. 

In subdivisions, some dry sewer was laid in anticipation of the new construction. Downing 
North Acres connected to the existing main on Summer Street. 

For Highway resurfacing programs, manhole covers were raised on Walnut Avenue and Love- 
joy Road. Existing house lines were extended on Lovejoy Road. 

One chimney manhole was rebuilt on the outfall sewer in South Lawrence. Three broken 
mains were repaired. 

Over 110 sewer blocks were cleared this year. 



68 






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69 



Tree, Moth And Dutch Elm Depts. 




Topping Diseased Elm with Aerial Ladder 



During 1963 the Tree Department planted 145 shade and 
flowering ornamental trees alond Andover's streets. Due to sum- 
mer drought conditions these newly planted trees were watered 
several times and mulched. 

A used 28 foot aerial ladder was purchased, reconditioned 
by department men and mounted on the newly purchased pickup 
truck. This piece of equipment has proven satisfactory since 
being put in service. 

Dutch Elm disease was diagnosed in 84 public elms during 
1963. Seventy-two of these have been cut down and burned at the 
town dump. The remaining diseased trees will be removed prior 
to March and the emergence of elm bark beetles which are known 
carriers of Dutch Elm disease from diseased to healthy trees. 

The Department of Natural Resources assisted in Dutch 
Elm scouting and removal of 45 diseased and dead elms. Over 130 
elms were removed this year. 

A telescopic crane and skyworker were used in topping 15 
hazardous trees over wires. This project was performed by co- 
-"-><=>. rative effort of the New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Massachusetts 
xectric Co. and the Andover Tree Department. 



A shade tree spray program designed to protect Andover's 
trees from destructive insects and diseases was completed. Ap- 
proved application methods and insecticides were used. Use of D. D. T. in spray formulas was 
discontinued. Four men from the Tree Department have attended State courses designed to qualify 
them as licensed spray equipment operators. 

Regular Department work of pruning, cabling, bark tracing, utility wire clearance super- 
vision and inspection was continued. Roadside mowing, brush cutting and chemical brush control 
was done. Poison ivy control was carried out along roadsides, at playgrounds, Pomps Pond bath- 
ing area and Camp Olympia. 

Tree Department personnel worked during all snow and ice storms, salting, sanding and 
plowing streets and sidewalks. 



70 



Planning Board 



Although the proposed Urban Renewal program for Andover was decisively defeated at 
Town Meeting, study and debate and decision concerning its many facets and implications occupied 
much of the Planning Board's time prior to its submission to the voters. The Board held the re- 
quired public hearings on zoning changes connected with Urban Renewal. 

Extensive revision of the Rules and Regulations governing subdivision in Andover, begun in 
1962, was finally adopted in April of 1963. 

To the Board's extreme regret, Mr. Jack Schoop left Adams, Howard and Greeley to become 
City Planner for Anchorage, Alaska. His last service to the Board included reports on Andover's 
so-called "cluster" zoning and an evaluation of the report of the Moderator-appointed committee's 
report, " Green Areas in Andover, Gain or Loss". The report on the last-named evaluation inclu- 
ded an analysis of the Massachusetts law concerning so-called Official Map, recommended in the 
"Green Areas" report, but never seriously considered for Andover because of the expense involved. 
Andover is indeed fortunate that Adams, Howard and Greeley had available a 1963 graduate of M.I. 
T. Planning School, Mr. Gordon Brigham, who has rendered outstanding service to Andover through- 
out the year. Under a new arrangement, with funds provided with Finance Committee approval, Mr. 
Brigham has spent one day a week in Andover and has regularly attended Planning Board meetings. 

In order to augment planning funds, the Board decided to apply for a so-called 701 grant 
from the federal government, to undertake revision and refinement of the now partially obsolete 
1957 Development Plan for Andover. Final approval of this program has not yet (as of January 
10th) been received from Washington but Mr. Brigham, with the supervision and assistance of Pro- 
fessor Frederick Adams, has begun this important work and will continue to carry it forward du- 
ring 1964. Among other things, Mr. Brigham will analyze population trends, circulation, the impact 
of new Route 495, present land use, developable land, land acquisition, current zoning for commer- 
cial and industrial areas and will recommend the needed changes. 

During 1963, the Planning Board has regularly sent a member, usually Chairman Harold T. 
King, to all Board of Appeals' hearings. Among the difficult problems before the Board of Appeals, 
which also directly concerned the Planning Board, was the Collins case on Florence Street, final 
disposition of which has not been decided as of this writing. The dispute hinged on uncertainty re- 
garding the precise boundary between Business District and Single Residence District, which has 
led the Planning Board to undertake a complete description of all such business -residential bounda- 
ries in the Town, together with a new map of the business areas, based on the 1957 Town Assessors' 
Maps . 

Since last April, the Planning Board has met for numerous extra sessions with the By-Law 
Revision Committee to complete the complex task of revising the format of the Zoning By-Law. 
Much of Mr. Brigham 's time, since September, has been spent on this work. Because of its com- 
plexities and extent, the Planning Board and By-Law Revision Committee, together with the Select- 
men, have decided to present this format revision, plus a number of urgent substantive changes for 
separate consideration at a Special Town Meeting scheduled for May, 1964. Most of these proposed 
changes are related to the updating of the Development Plan. 

Throughout 1963, the Central Merrimack Valley Regional Planning Commission has been 
very active. Among the items on its 1963 program, a comparative analysis of zoning and subdivi- 
sion regulations in the four communities, was of direct concern to Andover. During Mrs. Hammond's 
summer absence, Mr. John Cole, 2nd. ably served as alternate delegate to the Commission. During 
the fall months, several of the members of the Andover Planning Board met with the Commission, 
to consider the Subdivision and Zoning Report, (of value in providing perspective on and critical 
analysis of current Andover regulations). 



71 



The Planning Board met with the Recreation Director Bartow to plan joint policy regarding 
future playground sites in new subdivisions. 

Drainage problems of mutual concern to the Board of Health and the Planning Board have 
led to joint conferences of the two Boards and increasing cooperation between them. 

Chairman Harold T.King was elected a Director of the Massachusetts Federation of Plan- 
ning Boards in 1963. 

In its administration of the Subdivision Control Law, during 1963, the Planning Board en- 
dorsed ninety-four (94) plans containing one hundred and twenty two (122) lots under Form A (plans 
not requiring subdivision control procedure). Fourteen (14) subdivision plans with a total of three 
hundred and forty four (344) lots were submitted in 1963. Of these, eight (8) were approved, with 
a total of eighty two (82) lots; six (6) plans with a total of two hundred and ninety two (292) are still 
pending. 

Harold T. King, Chairman 
Virginia H. Hammond, Secretary 
John N. Cole, 2nd. 
James H. Eaton, III 
James T. Trenholm 



72 







Board Of Appeals Report 



The Board of Appeals, under the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Andover, has the following 
members: Alfred W. Fuller, Chairman, term expiring April 1, 1965; Edmond E.Hammond, Secre- 
tary, term expiring April 1, 1966; and Harold A. Rutter, Jr., term expiring April 1, 1964. Also 
there are three associate members who are as follows: Robert S. Zollner, term expiring April 1, 
1965; Harris Sanfilippo, term expiring April 1, 1964; and Sherley M. Sweet, Jr. , term expiring 
April 1, 1966. 

During the year 1963, the twenty-eighth year of the Zoning By-law, the Board heard 39 cases 
which were disposed of as follows: 

29 petitions granted 

8 petitions denied 

1 petition pending as of December 31, 1963 

1 petition withdrawn that had been heard 

A total of $344.00 was turned over to the Town Treasurer for advertising fees for the year 
ending December 31, 1963. 



Alfred W. Fuller, Chairman 
Edmond E. Hammond, Secretary 
Harold A. Rutter, Jr. 



Gravel Removal Hearings 



The Board of Selectmen, acting under the Town By-Law as as adopted at the Special Town 
Meeting of October 7, 1957, and approved by the Attorney General on October 17, 1957, heard 23 
petitions during 1963 for permission to remove sand and gravel for sale. These hearings were 
disposed of as follows: 

1 new petition was granted 
22 petitions for renewals were granted. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James D. Wilson, Chairman 
William Stewart, Secretary 
Philip K. Allen 
Paul D. Cronin 
Robert A. Watters 

73 



I School Building Committee 

The School Building Committee was organized in the late fall just prior to meeting with the 
School Committee to be apprized of, and discuss school construction needs. A comprehensive 
study had been made of the problem by the School Committee over the previous year. 

The most pressing need is at the secondary level where both High and Junior High facilities 
are virtually filled to or over capacity. Thus, action is necessary in the immediate future. The 
Building committee has been considering alternate plans for eventual construction and, since early 
December, has been interviewing architects interested in these projects. It is expected that an 
architect will be engaged in early February and a final decision, on which construction plan to 
follow, will be made by the first of March. 

The Building Committee will request an appropriation for architect's fees, to prepare pre- 
liminary plans, at the Annual Town Meeting and call for a Special Town Meeting in late Spring or 
early Fall, at which time, actual funds for construction of the new secondary facilities will be re- 
quested. A target date of September 1966 has been selected for the proposed opening of the new 
construction for use by the town. 

Robert B. Mclntyre, Chairman 
Mrs. Dudley Fitts, Secretary 
Benjamin O. Chase 
C. Lincoln Giles 
Frederick A. Higgins 
William E. Moriarty 
Walter N. Webster 



Land Acquisition Committee 

The Land Acquisition Committee has to its credit on the Town books as of December 31, 
1963, $86,946.57 from previous appropriations. 

During the year 1963, the Boy Scout land and building near Pomps Pond was acquired for 
$15,000. Additional land adjoining the Boy Scout Property, known as the "Manning land", was also 
acquired and the sum of $10,000. was allocated for its purchase. 

Under active consideration in 1963 were sites for schools in West and South Andover, a site 
for a fire station in West Andover, and additional land adjacent to the present Town Dump. 

The Committee will insert an article in the 1964 Town Warrant requesting a further appro- 
priation which, when added to the sum already at its disposal, will be used to acquire the parcels 
mentioned above. 



Joseph F.Adams, Chairman 
Richard W. Brooks 
John N. Cole 
Henry L. Hilton 
Robert B. Mclntyre 



74 



Development And Industrial Commission 



The year 1963 brought extensive changes in the composition of the Development and Indus- 
trial Commission. Early in the year, chairman Wallace M. Haselton found it necessary to termi- 
nate his long and effective association. In ensuing months the resignations of members Geoffrey 
Glendinning, Robert A. Watters and George B. Westhaver were also regretfully accepted. The 
Commission is indebted to all these former members for their willing and dedicated efforts. 

In order to make most effective use of the individual capabilities of the essentially new mem- 
bership, the Commission was reorganized and a number of sub-committees were established. Un- 
der a public relations chairman, the Andover industrial brochure was updated, a program of sending 
personal letters to selected executives was instituted, and plans are being formulated to obtain 
broader exposure of Andover's industrial and commercial advantages. A chairman responsible for 
local contact work has begun the job of regularly contacting existing enterprise to offer the Com- 
mission's services wherever needed. Plans are also being formulated to contact and become better 
acquainted with local industrial landowners. 

A chairman in charge of land utilization studies is actively reviewing blocks of industrial 
land to determine what land takings or facility installations the Commission should recommend. It 
is felt some of this may be necessary to protect the interests of both the Town and the various pro- 
perty owners involved. Included in this study will be proposals for industrial park arrangements. 

Another special sub-committee has been established to make a study as to how Andover may 
reasonably expect to benefit from further industrial development. It is hoped that a definitive analy- 
sis will both resolve some of the conflicting views that have been expressed in the past and also pro- 
vide the Commission with information regarding the most suitable types of industry to seek. 

While the Commission is as yet unable to report that its activities have resulted in any con- 
struction in the Andover industrial areas, efforts are continuing along the lines outlined above. In 
addition, all prospects that come to the Commission's attention are being evaluated and followed 
wherever appropriate. 

C. W. DeBell, Chairman 
H. M. Poynter, Secretary 
W. Berthold 

D. Duncan 
G. Grubbs 
H. Halle r 
J.R. McLeod 
R . Phinney 

R . M. Sullivan 



75 



Building Inspector 



There were 577 permits of all kinds issued during the year and broken down as follows: 

165 New Dwellings -garages Value: $ 2,970,944 

31 Other Buildings 874,325 
305 Additions & Alterations 463,242 

7 Swimming Pools 13,000 

12 Sign Permits 5,560 

6 Elevator Repair Permits 15,000 

32 Raze Permits 
16 Renewals 

3 Moving Permits 

Total Fees-$6, 036 Total Valuation - $4,342,071 

Elevators were inspected regularly. There were 52 inspections and safety certificates 
issued, and 6 elevators were repaired. 

There were 87 Certificates of Occupancy issued. 

A great number of Zoning and Building violations were received, investigated and followed 
up. Most of the violations were corrected amicably and quickly. 

Gravel pits have been under constant inspection throughout the Town. 

All electric wiring permits are issued and records kept in this office. 

ARTHUR PEATMAN 
Building Inspector 



Wire Inspector 

I hereby submit my report for wire inspection permits for the year 1963: 

172 Permits @ $5.00 (New) for $ 860.00 

373 Permits @ $1 . 00 (Add) for 373. 00 

1 Permit @ 2. 00 

2 Permits voided 



548 Permits-Turned in to Treas: $1235.00 

There have been at least three (3) inspections on all New work and one (1) inspection for all 
others. In addition, Nursing Homes and Day Nurseries are inspected regularly. 

ALEXANDER RITCHIE, Jr. 
Inspector of Wires 

76 



Weights And Measures 



The Department of Weights and Measures hereby submits its annual report relating to in- 
spections, reweighings and sealing activities for the year ending December 31, 1963. 

The following items were checked for proper weight, per marking. 



Item 



Number weighed 



Correct 


Under we: 


Lght 


Over weight 


247 


81 




184 


118 


18 






114 








7 


5 




51 


716 


93 




87 


185 


14 




71 


1003 


287 




116 


201 


40 




3 


433 


104 








30 




135 


411 


69 




101 


443 


20 






92 






43 


86 






301 

46 


26 






47 



Bread 

Butter 

Oleomargarine 

Confectionery 

Fruits -Vegetables 

Liquid Commodities 

Meats 

Fish 

Fowl 

Potatoes 

Milk 

Cheese 

Cereals 

Cookies -Crackers 

Flour 

Soap 



Totals 



512 
136 
114 
63 
896 
270 

1406 
244 
537 
165 
581 
463 
135 
387 
46 
73 

6028 



4082 



761 



1185 



Inspections were made on the following: 

Paper or fibre cartons (content) 14 

Pedlers license 26 

Milk bottles (contents) 5 

Clinical thermometers (Mass.App. ) 38 

Marking of bread & food pkgs. 785 

Gasoline pump retests after sealing 6 

Inspection- fuel oil delivery 48 

A total of 137 reweighings covering municipal food purchases were made by this department. 

The Department sealed 665 weighing or measuring devices, adjusted 61 and attached NOT SEALED 
labels on 7 units . 

Sealing fees amounted to $259. 10. Receipts amounting to $254.20 were turned over to the Town 
Treasurer, whose receipt I hold. 



NEWTON A. JONES 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



77 



Trustees Of Spring Grove Cemetery 



The Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit their Annual Report for the year of 1963. 

During the year the Cemetery sold 25 new lots and had 83 interments. There were 4 less 
lots sold than in 1962 and 4 less interments. From the perpetual care payments on the lots sold 
and from payments made by 4 lot holders placing lots previously purchased under perpetual care 
a total of $4,091. 50 was given the Town Treasurer to be added to our Perpetual Care Funds. 
This fund now totals $146. 131. and income amounting to $5,799.40 was received from it in 1963. 
This income is available for the reduction in the operating cost of the Cemetery. 

A total of $4, 568.99 was received from the sale of new lots, interments, vault sales, 
foundation installations and for the care of lots not under perpetual care. These general receipts 
and the income from the Perpetual Care Fund totalled $10, 368. 39 which was turned over to the 
Town Treasurer. The 1963 Cemetery appropriation was $31,773 but only $27,759.40 was expen- 
ded. Consequently after crediting the monies given back to the Town the actual cost of operating 
the Cemetery was $17,391. 

A total of 640 feet of hot top road was added during the year making 6, 961 feet of perma- 
nently surfaced road in the Cemetery. This has substantially reduced maintenance costs and we 
plan to continue this improvement as rapidly as possible. 

We regret to report the death of William D. Mclntyre during the year. Mr. Mclntyre had 
been a Trustee since 1952 and was of great help to the Board during his years of membership. 
Edward P.Hall has been appointed as a Trustee in his place. 



TRUSTEES OF SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

Fred E. Cheever, Chairman 
Albert E. Curtis, Secretary 
Edward P. Hall 
Malcolm E. Lundgren 
Irving J. Whitcomb 



78 



Central Merrimack Valley Planning District 

Mr. Richard Alexander, of The Planning Services Group of Cambridge, began his work as 
part-time resident planner for the District in February. Through the courtesy of the Methuen 
Planning Board, Mr. Alexander used its office in the Methuen Municipal Office Building on Tues- 
days and Thursdays. The telephone, listed under Regional Planning, is 686-0361. 

Mr. Alexander has divided his time among a series of three projects in the federally- 
assisted planning program, in dealing with current planning problems of a regional nature, and in 
implementing the planning program as mapped out in 1962. 

The federally-assisted ("701") program has three items: a comparative study of zoning 
laws and subdivision control regulations in the four communities, a regional bibliography of all 
planning literature and reports dealing with the region and a proposed regional fiscal program for 
the purpose of establishing realistic means of financing previous planning recommendations for the 
region. Of these three items the zoning-subdivision study and the bibliography have been completed 
and are available for use to all interested persons. The fiscal program is still pending. 

During the spring and summer, when the Commission reviewed with Mr. Alexander and Mr. 
Justin Gray of The Planning Services Group the reports concerning zoning and subdivision regula- 
tions, and the memorandum entitled "Techniques of Guiding Land Development", various members 
of the four local planning boards and boards of appeals participated in the often lively discussion. 
Several members of the Andover Board joined in reviewing the memorandum "Andover and Region- 
al Planning Recommendations". 

Staff members of the Boston Regional Planning Project (BRPP), which includes represen- 
tatives of the (federal) Bureau of Public Roads, the (federal ) Housing and Home Finance Agency, 
and the (Mass. ) Dep't. of Public Works, the (Mass. ) Mass Transportation Commission and a non- 
voting member of the (Mass. ) Division of Planning, attended a number of Commission meetings 
during 1963, in the interest of assuring liaison and cooperation between our region and theirs. The 
BRPP region includes all the cities and towns within the arc of Route 495, plus a one-town ring out- 
side this arc, an area of 2200 square miles. Mr. Julian Steele of the BRPP requested signature by 
qualified representatives from each of our four communities of a Memorandum of Agreement re- 
garding federally-assisted road building in Massachusetts. 

In April the Commission voted to oppose House Bill 2180, which would have authorized the 
Mass Transportation Commission to study and establish regional planning districts in the Common- 
wealth. This bill was in direct conflict with previous legislation. The Commission also felt that 
the MTC is improperly constituted for this work, having no local representation. The bill was 
defeated. 

In the fall, the Commission concerned itself with certain proposed changes in the Regional 
Planning Law, Chapter 40B, and attended several meetings with representatives in the State Divi- 
sion of Planning and other regional commissions, to iron out differences. A bill has been filed to 
amend 40B. The Commission will favor parts of it and oppose others. 

Study of the floodplains withing our region by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, originally 
scheduled for 1963, was postponed for lack of funds and will not be undertaken until 1965. Follow- 
ing meetings with Commissioner Graf of the Massachusetts Water Resources Commission and with 
the Army Corps of Engineers in Waltham, some interim action will be taken. A bill filed by Sena- 
tor Wall for the 1964 legislative session provides the necessary authorization for the Water Re- 
sources Commission to follow up the Army Corps of Engineers study, when made. Data from 
previous flood work done by the Corps in our region has been forwarded to us, to serve as a guide 
to local Planning Boards, Boards of Appeals and Building Inspectors when reviewing subdivisions 
and other development withing floodplains . 

79 



Mr. Alexander has ably represented the Commission in a number of matters of regional 
import during 1963, including the proposal to build a marina on the Merrimack River, pollution 
control of the Merrimack, and the proposed access road from Route 93 into Lawrence. 

At the instigation of the Commission a conference with Lawrence officials, including Mayor 
Buckley and two Aldermen, City Engineer Nicolosi, Redevelopment Director Sirois, Louise Four- 
nier, and a press representative was held in December to air the problems implicit in Senator 
Wall's legislative bill authorizing state funds to improve Marston, Garden and Prospect Streets in 
Lawrence for access from Route 495 into the city. Our Commission strongly urged a better alter- 
native: Marston, Garden and Canal Streets, to provide ready access into the Central Business 
District, threatened with strangulation by present and proposed traffic patterns. 

Various means of effectuation of the multi-facted regional Development Plan deeply concerned 
the Commission during 1963. A Community Action Committee has been proposed; the Commission 
also sought means to appoint an alternate member from each community to attend meetings regularly. 
Presentation of the proposed regional plan to be made in the spring of 1964 will probably be done 
through the newspapers. After publication and discussion meetings, the plan will be subject to modi- 
fications arising from local criticism. 

Late in 1963 discussion began concerning the future work program and staffing arrangements 
for the District. The Commission hopes to be able to finance a full-time Planning Director with a 
staff and office in Lawrence. All members agree that the most important work to be undertaken in 
1964, with federal assistance, will be study of the impact of about-to-be-completed Route 495 on the 
traffic circulation and land use patterns of the region and its economic development. 

Mr. Donald Dow of Methuen was replaced on the Commission by Mr. John E.Leone in the 
spring of 1963. Mr. Donald MacNeil of Lawrence resigned during the summer and was replaced by 
Mr. Jean B. Ippolito. During Mrs. Hammond's summer absence Mr. John N. Cole of Andover served 
as alternate delegate. 

In May officers were rotated making Mrs. Hammond Chairman (replaced by Mr. Bannan tem- 
porarily during the summer months), Mr. MacNeil Vice-Chairman (now held by Mr . Ippolito), Mr. 
Bannan, Treasurer, and Mr. Leone, Secretary. 

The Commission welcomed the presence of representatives of the Andover League of Women 
Voters at most of its 1963 meetings. 



VIRGINIA H. HAMMOND, Chairman 



Virginia H. Hammond 
Jean B. Ippolito 
James M. Bannan 
John R . Leone 



80 



Merrimack River Valley 
Pollution Abatement Commission 

Following is my report as the representative of the Town on the Merrimack River Valley 
Pollution Abatement Commission. The Commission was formed as a result of Chapter 85, Resol- 
ves of 1962. Included are one Senator, 3 Representatives, representatives of various State Boards, 
and one each from the 18 cities and towns which might discharge into the Merrimack River. I was 
appointed by the Selectmen on August 7, 1962. 

The Commission was directed to study the pollution of the river from domestic sewage and 
industrial wastes, to determine the sources of pollution, to present plans for treatment, and to 
prepare proper legislation. The Commission received an appropriation of $80, 000 for engineering 
studies, to include reference to the Senate Document 550 of 1946 on the river, which reported on 
pollution and presented plans for abatement. These were rejected by referendum. 

Following frequent meetings of the Commission and engineering studies, general plans were 
presented in September, 1963, for a district treatment plant for Lawrence, Andover, Methuen and 
North Andover; another plant for Greater Lowell; a plant for Haverhill and adjacent towns; and 
separate plants for the towns and cities down stream. In the meanwhile, Newburyport has begun to 
build a separate plant, and Amesbury is making its own plans for treatment outside the area of the 
Commission plans. 

In October, 1963, the engineers presented definite cost plans to the Commission. For the 
Greater Lawrence district, it was shown that joint treatment for the four communities would be 
about 25% cheaper than separate action. Following a progress report, a joint meeting was held for 
the four communities, attended by three Selectmen and the Manager, and at this definite cost figures 
and plans were presented. The figures included an estimated contribution of $2.4 million from 
Federal sources, which has been set up, but not appropriated to date. 

On the basis of present estimates, the cost of individual plants would total $40 million, as 
against $31. 2 million for a joint plant. The cost of a separate plant for Andover would be $3, 120, - 
000, and our share of a joint plant would be $2,430, 000. Retirement of this amount, with 40 year 
bonds and an estimated 3. 6% interest, would be $135, 000 annually. Cost of operation of a separate 
plant would be $177, 000 per year, and for a joint plant, $126, 000. 

The total cost for the Town would be $26l, 000 per year, or about $2. 65 per thousand on our 
present valuation, and about $2.30 on the "real" valuation. The Commission has recommended that 
the cost of construction should be met from general taxation, and the cost of operation should be 
largely met by a sewage tax, based on water consumption. 

The Commission, as directed by the Legislature, has prepared enabling legislation. The 
act proposed calls for the formation of a Board, with two representatives from Lawrence and one 
each from the towns, with authority to build a treatment plant, located under present thought in 
North Andover, and to construct the necessary lines to conduct the sewage from the communities 
to the plant; to operate the plant; to employ necessary personnel; and to assess the costs on the 
communities. The usual powers for land taking, right-of-way, etc. , have been included. 

The proposed act will be submitted to the 1964 Legislature for hearings, amendments, and 
final passage. If passed, the act calls for submission to the voters of the four communities at the 
State Election in November, 1964. The act would take effect if approved by a majority of the town 
and city voters in total. 

Copies of the proposed act and cost figures have been presented to the Town authorities, and 
a final report of the engineers, who are Camp, Dresser and McKee, of Boston will be available. 

Joseph A. McCarthy 

81 



Greater Lawrence Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District 

To the Citizens of: City of Lawrence, Town of Andover, Town of Methuen, Town of North Andover 



In the November 6, 1962 election, the City of Lawrence voted and in the March 4, 1963 town elec- 
tions, the three towns voted to accept the provisions of Chapter 330 of the Acts of I960 as amended, 
for the establishment of a regional school district for vocational training in accordance with the 
Agreement filed with the City Council and the Selectmen of the Towns. A.s provided for in Chapter 
330, the District was duly established upon the acceptance of the Agreement. 

The Agreement provides for an Interim Committee of seven members to serve until the next elec- 
tions following the establishment of the District. In accordance with the Agreement, three of the 
members were appointed by the Mayor of the City of Lawrence, two by the Moderator of the Town 
of Methuen, and one each by the Moderators of the Towns of Andover and North Andover. The three 
members from Lawrence were duly elected for a two-year term in the November 5, 1963 election 
to serve until January 1, 1966. The towns will vote on candidates for District Committee in the 
March, 1964 elections . 

The District Committee had a preliminary meeting on April 15, 1963 to discuss organization and 
procedure and met in thirty-four official meetings during the remainder of the year. In addition, 
the Committee members visited other vocational schools, and had conferences with the School 
Building Assistance Commission, the Division of Vocational Education and the Emergency Finance 
Board. 

The Committee kept the municipalities advised of their plans and progress by distributing copies of 
the minutes of the meetings to the Mayor and the City Council of Lawrence, to the Chairmen of the 
Board of Selectmen of the Towns, the Superintendents of Schools and other interested people. 

A schedule was adopted which proposes to have the new school ready for occupancy by the Fall of 
1965. In accordance with this schedule, action was taken on the following items: 

1. Election of Committee Officers. 

2. Adoption of budget for 1963. 

3. Selection of site on River Road in West Andover. 

4. Selection of Educational Consultant. 

5. Adoption of Educational Specifications. 

6. Selection of an architect. 

7. Preparation of preliminary plans for the new school. 

8. Action taken to incur debt for the purpose of preparing plans and 
acquiring land for the site of the new school. 

9. Acceptance of design for official seal of the District. 

10. Selection of a Superintendent-Director. 

11. Adoption of a budget for 1964. 

The budget for 1963 totaled $8, 690 (eight thousand, six hundred and ninety dollars) apportioned to 
the municipalities in accordance with the Agreement. 



Lawrence 


70% 


$6,083. 


00 


Methuen 


20% 


1,738. 


00 


Andover 


5% 


434. 


50 


North Andover 


5% 


434. 


50 






$8,690. 


00 



82 



The expenditures by the District during 1963 were as follows: 

Flanagan Insurance Agency - Treasurer's bond $ 10. 00 

Bernard Ostreicher - Preliminary design of seal 25. 00 

Whipple and Magane - Land appraisal 150. 00 

Roland Siskind - Land appraisal 150. 00 

Stowers Associates - Sub soil tests 450. 00 

James A. Booth - Educational Specifications 600. 00 

Stowers Associates - Topographical Survey 1, 726. 95 

Lawrence Eagle-Tribune - Ad for clerk 6. 35 

John R . Hosking, Inc. - District seal and press 96. 00 

John R. Hosking, Inc. - Office Supplies 19.83 

Petty Cash - Office supplies 15. 48 

Stamped envelopes and postage 54. 15 

Post Office Box rent 7. 50 

Registry of Deeds - Prints 1.00 

Telephone 20.13 

Parking for State House visit . 85 

Total $3,333.24 

The following budget submitted to the municipalities for the operating and capital expenditures du- 
ring the year 1964 has been decreased by the unexpended balance remaining in the treasury on 
December 31, 1963 less the items in the 1963 budget which will not be billed until 1964. 

FINAL BUDGET FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1964 

Operating Budget: 

1. Vocational School Director salary $12, 000. 00 

2. Clerk-typis salary 3, 600. 00 

3. Telephone - local and long distance 500. 00 

4. Postage 250.00 

5. Stationery and office supplies 400. 00 

6 . Office equipment 500 . 00 

7. Travel expenses 1, 500. 00 

8. Legal Counsel 1,200.00 

9. Printing descriptive information 2, 000. 00 

10. Social Security and pension fund 1, 000. 00 

1 1 . Contingencies 1, 100. 00 * 

Total 24,050.00 
Capital Budget: 

1. Interest on bank loans ($153, 000) 5,500.00 

2. Interest on bonds less interest on deposits 20, 000. 00 

3 . Cle rk of the works 7, 000. 00 

Total $32,500.00 

Grand Total $56,550.00 

*Note: Contingencies covers unforeseen items for both Operating and Capital 
budgets during planning and construction period. 



83 



Allocation to Municipalities: 



Lawrence 


70% 


$39,585. 


00 


Methuen 


20% 


11, 310. 


00 


Andover 


5% 


2, 827. 


50 


North Andover 


5% 


2, 827. 


50 



The Committee wishes to acknowledge the assistance of the Advisory Board of Superintendents of 
Schools: 

Douglas A. Chandler North Andover 

Edward I. Erickson Andover 

James F. Hennessey Lawrence 

Walter B. Ingalls Methuen 

Also the assistance of the following Vocational Advisors: 

John J. Fitzgerald Commercial Art 

Howard N. Freedman Food Trades 

John J. Grabowski Machine Shop 

Edward A. Hamel Auto Body Shop 

Albert P. Manzi Basic Electricity 

Edward W. Moye Drafting 

Raymond D. Taylor Auto Shop 

Walter C. Wilson, Jr. Metal Fabrication 

William J. Workman Electronics 

The Committee also wants to express their appreciation to the City and Town Clerks for their co- 
oeration in preparing the papers required for the validation of the District, and to the Lawrence 
Eagle-Tribune for a fine job in reporting the proceedings of the Committee meetings and in keeping 
the public informed of the local and broader aspects of vocational training. 



GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH 
SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Fred S. Tarbox, - Chairman (Andover) 
John P. Ford - Vice Chairman (Lawrence) 
Robert E. Christ - Treasurer (Lawrence) 
Vance C. Peterson- Secretary (No. Andover) 
Bernard J. Champy - (Methuen) 
Joseph S. Skop - (Methuen) 
Joseph F. Sweeney - (Lawrence) 



84 




The Trustees Of Punchard Free Schoo 



Year ending December 31, 1963 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



January 1, 1963 

Cash in Banks 
Real Estate Mortgages 
Bonds at Book Value 
Total 



$28,663.86 

8,385.96 

39,950. 18 



$77,000.00 



December 31, 1963 

Cash in Banks 
Real Estate Mortgages 
Bonds at Book Value 
Total 



$29,604.72 

7,445. 10 

39,950. 18 



$77,000.00 



RECEIPTS 



INCOME ACCOUNT 



Cash on hand January 1, 1963 
Interest and Dividends received 



$ 1, 187. 17 
2, 870.09 



$ 4,057.26 



EXPENDITURES 



Safe Deposit Box 
Treasurer's Bond 
Salary- -Clerk and Treasurer 
Postage and Stationery 

Expenditures for Study Methods Program- 
Industrial Arts, Library and other 
High School Departments 



11.00 

25.00 

250. 00 

4.34 



2,360.76 



$ 2,651. 10 



December 31, 1963 



Cash on hand 

Total to Balance 



$ 1,406. 16 
$ 4,057.26 



RESERVE FUND 



January 1, 1963 

December 31, 1963 



Cash in Savings Banks 
Interest Received 



$10, 106.92 
408. 30 



$10, 515.22 



85 



GOLDSMITH FUND 



January 1, 1963 



December 31, 1963 



Cash in Savings Bank 
Interest received 

Prizes awarded 
Cash in Savings Bank 



347. 34 
14.02 



361. 36 
10.00 



351.36 



January 1, 1963 



December 31, 1963 



DRAPER FUND 



Cash in Savings Bank 
Interest received 

Scholarship awarded 
Cash in Savings Bank 



$ 1, 537.91 
60. 50 

$ 1, 598.41 
80.00 



BARNARD FUND 



$ 1, 518.41 



January 1, 1963 



December 31, 1963 



Cash in Savings Bank 
Dividends received 
Interest received 

Prizes awarded 
Cash in Savings Bank 



34.05 

40.00 

.56 



74.61 
40.00 



34.61 



CHAPIN FUND 



January 1, 1963 

December 31, 1963 

HENRY 



Cash in Savings Bank 
Interest received 

Scholarship awarded 
Cash in Savings Bank 



$ 2,315.25 
91. 72 

$ 2,406.97 
90.00 



$ 2, 316.97 
WARREN BARNARD & MABEL PARADISE BARNARD FUND 



January 1, 1963 



December 31, 1963 



Cash in Savings Bank 
Interest received 

Baseball Equipment 
Cash in Savings Bank 



$ 1, 157.76 

43. 14 

$ 1,200.90 

180.00 



$ 1, 020.90 



ELIZABETH T. GUTTERSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



January 1, 1963 



December 31, 1963 



Cash in Savings Bank 
Interest received 

Scholarship awarded 
Cash in Savings Bank 



$ 1,022. 88 
40. 50 

$ 1,063. 38 
40.00 



$ 1,023.38 



January 1, 1963 



December 31, 1963 



M. E. GUTTERSON BOTANY PRIZES 



Cash in Savings Bank 
Interest received 

Prizes awarded 
Cash in Savings Bank 



333.43 
13.04 



$ 346.47 
10.00 



336.47 



86 



ALICE M. BELL FUND 

January 1, 1963 Cash in Savings Bank $ 1,022.58 

Interest received 40. 50 

$ 1,063. 08 
Scholarship awarded 40. 00 

December 31, 1963 Cash in Savings Bank $ 1,023.08 



HARRY SELLARS, Treasurer 

This is to certify that the securities belonging to the Trustees of the Punchard Free School 
and the income accruing therefrom have been checked and found to be correct. 

The remaining items in the above Accounts are examined by the Town Accountant. 

C. Carle ton Kimball 
Arthur W. Cole 
Edmond E. Hammond 
Fred W. Doyle 



87 



John Cornel Wood And Coal Fund 



Following is the statement of the John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund for the year ending Dec- 
ember 31, 1963. 



Andover Savings Bank, Andover 
Essex Savings Bank, Lawrence 
Broadway Savings Bank, Lawrence 
City Institute of Savings, Lowell 
The Central Savings Bank, Lowell 



Book #13259 
" #82865 
" #13405 
" #69782 
" #21760 



$ 1,000. 00 
$ 1,000.00 
$ 1,000.00 
$ 1,000.00 
$ 1,000.00 



RECEIPTS 



Balance on hand January 1, 1963 
Interest received during 1963 



$ 2, 175.04 

205.00 

$ 2,380.04 



EXPENDITURES 



January 21, 1963 
January 24, 1963 
February 18, 1963 
October 11, 1963 



Nelligan & Janes Oil Co. 
Cross Coal Co. 
Nelligan & Janes Oil Co. 
Lawrence Gas Co. 



18. 


00 


50. 


00 


12. 


98 


183. 


16 



$ 264. 14 



BALANCE ON HAND January 1, 1964 



$ 2, 115.90 



Arthur W. Cole, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Treasurer 
Irving J. Whitcomb 



88 



Report Of The Director Of Accounts 



April 17, 1963 

To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. Russell G. Doyle, Chairman 

Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and accounts of the Town 
of Andover for the fiscal year 1962, made in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter i|l|., General Laws . This is in the form of a report made to me by 
Mr. William Schwartz, Assistant Director of Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 

ARTHUR H. MacKINNON 
Director of Accounts 



Mr. Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the fiscal year 1962, and report thereon 
as follows: 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books of the several departments 
receiving or disbursing money for the town or committing bills for collection, 
were examined, checked, and verified by comparison with the records in the of- 
fices of the town accountant and the town treasurer. 

The books and accounts in the town accountant's office were examined and checked. 
The general and appropriation ledger accounts were analyzed. The recorded re- 
ceipts and payments were checked with the treasurer's books and with the depart- 
mental records, while the appropriations, transfers, and loan authorizations, 
as entered, were checked with the town clerk's records of town meeting votes and 
with the finance committee's records of transfers authorized from the reserve 
fund. 

The necessary adjusting entries resulting from the audit were made, and a balance 
sheet, showing the financial condition of the town as of December 31» 1962, was 
prepared and is appended to this report. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were examined and checked in detail. 
The recorded receipts were analyzed and compared with the town accountant's 
records, with the records in the several departments in which money was collected 
for the town, and with other sources from which money was paid into the town 
treasury. The payments, as recorded, were checked with the warrants authorizing 
the treasurer to disburse town funds and with the town accountant's records. 

The cash balance on December 31» 1962 was proved by reconciliation of the bank 
balances with statements furnished by the banks of deposit, by examination of the 
savings bank book, the certificates of deposit, and the safekeeping receipts for 

89 



treasury bills, and by actual count of the cash in the office. 

The payments on account of maturing debt and interest were verified by compar- 
ison with the amounts falling due and were checked with the cancelled securities 
and coupons on file. The amount on deposit for matured coupons was reconciled 
with a statement furnished by the depository. 

The records of tax titles and tax possessions held by the town were examined and 
listed, and all transactions pertaining thereto were verified, including a com- 
parison with the records at the Registry of Deeds. 

The savings bank books and securities, representing the investment of the trust, 
investment, and retirement funds in the custody of the town treasurer and the 
treasurers of the trustees of the John Cornell Welfare Fund, the Punchard Free 
School Fund and the Memorial Hall Library Fund, were examined and listed. The 
income was proved, and the disbursements and transfers to the town W9re verified. 

The deductions from employees' salaries for Federal and State taxes, Blue Cross 
and Blue Shield, group life insurance, purchase of savings bonds, and for the 
United Fund were listed and checked with the treasurer's receipts. The payments 
to the proper agencies and the refunds to individuals were verified, while the 
balances in the general treasury on December 31 » 1962 were proved. 

The assessors' records of abatements granted were reconciled with the collector's 
books and with the accountant's ledger. The assessors' warrants for the commit- 
ment of taxes, excise, and assessments were examined and checked with the detail- 
ed lists. The records of assessments apportioned and suspended were examined, 
while the apportioned and suspended assessments not due were listed and reconciled 
with the accountant's ledger accounts. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were examined and checked. The taxes, 
excise, special assessments, and water liens outstanding according to the pre- 
vious examination, as well as all subsequent commitments, were audited and check- 
ed with the assessors' warrants issued for their collection. The payments to 
the treasurer were verified, the recorded abatements were compared with the ass- 
essors' records of abatements granted, the transfers to the tax title account 
were proved, and the outstanding accounts were listed and reconciled with the 
respective controlling ledger accounts. 

The books and accounts of the collector of water charges were examined and check- 
ed in detail. The commitments were verified, the recorded collections were 
checked with the payments to the treasurer, the abatements were compared with the 
departmental records of abatements granted, and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and proved. 

The outstanding tax, excise, assessment, departmental, and water accounts were 
further verified by mailing notices to a large number of persons whose names ap- 
peared on the books as owing money to the town, the replies received thereto in- 
dicating that the outstanding accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The records of dog, sporting, and town licenses issued, as well as of miscella- 
neous permits and fees collected by the town clerk, were examined and checked, 
and the recorded payments to the State and to the town treasurer were verified. 

The records of departmental accounts receivable and of miscellaneous receipts of 
the sealer of weights and measures, and the inspectors of buildings, wires and 
plumbing, as well as of the police, fire, health, public works, school, library, 
and cemetery departments, and of all other departments collecting money for the 
town or committing bills for collection, were examined and checked. The pay- 
ments to the treasurer were verified, the outstanding accounts were listed and 
proved, and the cash balances were verified by actual count of the cash on hand 
in the several departments. 

The surety bonds furnished by the several town officials for the faithful per- 

90 



formance of their duties were examined and found to be in proper form. 

In addition to the balance wheet, there are appended to this report tables show- 
ing reconciliations of the treasurer's and town clerk's cash, summaries of the 
tax, excise, assessment, tax title, tax possession, departmental, and water 
accounts, as well as schedules showing the condition and transactions of the 
several trust, investment, and retirement funds. 

While engaged in making the audit cooperation was received from all town offi- 
cials, for which, on behalf of my assistants and for myself, I wish to express 
appreciation. 



WILLIAM SCHWARTZ 

Assistant Director of Accounts 



91 



Report of the Town Accountant 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1963 



In accordance with Chapter Lj.1, Section 6l, of the General Laws, I sub- 
mit herewith my annual report for the year ending December 31, 19&3 • 

A detailed statement of the receipts and their sources, and of the pay- 
ments and the purposes therefor, follows. The condition of the various 
trust funds, as well as the Town of Andover Retirement Fund, sources of 
incomes and the amounts paid out are also set forth. A statement of the 
maturing debt and interest is included. 

A balance sheet, which is appended to this report, was prepared show- 
ing the assets and liabilities as of December 31» 1963* 

The State Accountants have complied with statutes and audited the Town 
books for the year ending December 31 » 19&2. They are now in the pro- 
cess of auditing the Town's accounts for the year 19&3. 

May I express ray thanks for the co-operation accorded to me by the 
various Departments during the past year. 



WENDELL A . MATTHESON 
Town Accountant 



92 



Appropriations 



TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 9, 1963 



General Government $ 151,030.00 

Protectee tion Persons and Property 5>03,6l9.00 

Health and Sanitation 59,908„00 

Highway* 321,919.00 

Charities and Veterans' Services 113, 1+71. 00 

Schools and Libraries 1,923,111.00 

Recreation and Unclassified 239,739.00 

Enterprise and Cemeteries l81|., 666.00 

Bond Issue, Interest and Maturing Debt 39l4-,920.00 



,892,383o00 



93 



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ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY 

BOARD OP RETIREMENT REPORT 

Cash on Hand, January 1, 19&3 |6, 097 069 

Receipts: 

Appropriations : 

Town Pension Fund |63,119o00 

Andover Housing Authority 761.IJ.3 

Expense Fund 2,835 <>00 

Members' Contributions 58*032.92 

Investment Income 21,237 -k-b 

Bond Maturity 15,000,00 

Refund lij.2.50 161,128.31 

167,226.00 



Expenditures : 

Annuities 12,212.2l|. 

Pensions 76,119.57 

Investments Ij.9,720 o 60 

Accrued Interest on Investments I4.13 «10 

Refunds 3,237.30 
Office Maintenance: 

Salaries : 

Accountant 2I1-I067 

Clerk 1,787.52 

Safe Deposit 50 00 

Svirety Bonds 52.50 

Dues, Meals & Travel 97 .78 

Office Supplies 220.50 lUlj., 152.78 



Cash on Hand, December 31, 1963 $ 23,073 °22 



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135 



INDEX 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 54 

ASSESSORS' REPORT 39 

BOARD OF APPEALS 73 

BOARD OF HEALTH 52 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 47 

BOARD OF RETIREMENT 130 

BONDS, REDEMPTION OF (See Town Debt) 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 76 

CEMETERY FUNDS 35 

CENSUS 7 

CENTRAL MERRIMACK VALLEY 

PLANNING DISTRICT 79 

CIVIL DEFENSE 63 

CORNELL FUND 88 

DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL 

COMMISSION 75 

DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTS 89 

DOG OFFICER. 54 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 61 

GRAVEL REMOVAL HEARINGS 73 

HOUSING AUTHORITY REPORT 49 

Balance Sheets 50 

JURY LIST 132 

LAND ACQUISITION COMMITTEE 74 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Library Statistics 46 

Report of Librarian 42 

Trustees' Report 41 

MERRIMACK RIVER VALLEY POLLUTION 

ABATEMENT COMMISSION 81 

MUNICIPAL CONTRIBUTORY 

RETIREMENT FUND 129 

MUNICIPAL PROPERTIES & PUBLIC 

IMPROVEMENTS 40 

PLANNING BOARD 71 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 59 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 64 

Employees 64 

Highway 6 5 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT - cont. 

Bridges 66 

Snowfall 66 

Parks 66 

Tree Department 70 

New Equipment 64 

Street Lighting 66 

Water Pumping Report 68 

Water System Summary 69 

Water System 67 

Sewerage System 68 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 56 

REGISTERED VOTERS 7 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE REPORT . . 74 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 78 

TAX COLLECTOR 37 

Miscellaneous Collections 37 

Summary of Tax Collector's Cash Account 38 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 92 

TOWN ACCOUNTS 

Appropriations for 1963 93 

Unpaid Taxes -December 31,1963 .... 122 

Receipts-Analysis of Revenue Account . . 122 

Receipts-Analysis of Surplus Revenue . . 123 

Receipts-for 1963 94 

Expenditures 97 

Balance Sheet 124 

Deferred Revenue 127 

Trust Funds . • • • 128 

TOWN CLERK 32 

TOWN DEBT 34 

TOWN MANAGER'S REPORT 30 

TOWN MEETING - Annual 9 

Annual Adjourned .... 12 

Special 28 

TOWN OFFICERS 3 

TREASURER 33 

TRUST FUNDS 36 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL . 85 

VETERANS' SERVICES 55 

VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 82 

WEIGHTS & MEASURES ". 77 

WIRE INSPECTOR'S REPORT 76 




FOR 

SERVICE 

CALL.... 



EMERGENCY 

Ambulance 475-1212 

Fire 475-1212 

Police 475-0390 



FOR 


CALL 


FOR 




CALL 


Animal Inspector 


475-3600 


Selectmen 




475-2440 


Assessments 


475-2081 


Sewers 




475-2392 


Building Inspector 


475-2946 


Subdivisions, Land 




475-2946 


Cemetery - Spring Grove 


475-2145 


Tax Collector 




475-0868 


Civil Defense 


475-0022 


Town Clerk 




475-3205 


Dog Officer 


682-7538 


Town Manager 




475-5560 


Draft Board 


475-1378 


Tree Dept. 




475-0844 


Garbage Collection 


686-4370 


Veterans Services 




475-1705 


Health Board 


475-0242 


Vital Statistics, Records 


475-3205 


Highway Dept. 


475-0844 


Voting-Registration, 


etc. 


475-3205 


Library, Memorial Hall 


475-0314 


Water Dept. 




475-2392 


Plumbing Inspector 


475-0242 


Weights & Measures 




475-2617 


Planning Board 


475-2946 


Welfare Dept. 




475-1323 


Recreation 


475-3561 


Wire Inspection 




475-2946 


Schools - Supt. Office 


475-2218 


Zoning Problems 




475-2946 


PRINTED BY: 


TOWN PRINTING CO. 


^4i™A. ANDOVER. 


MASS. 





THE CITY MANAGER'S 

CODE OF ETHICS 

JLo ACHIEVE effective and democratic local government, the council-manager flan provides 
that policies shall be determined by the governing body elected by the people and that the administra- 
tion of such policies shall be vested in the city manager who shall be appointed by and responsible to 
the governing body. The purpose of the International City Managers' Association, the professional 
organization of city managers, is to increase the proficiency of city managers and to aid in the 
improvement of municipal government. To further these objectives, the Association believes that certain 
ethical principles should govern the conduct of every professional city manager: 



INo member of the profession accepts 
a position as city manager unless he 
is fully in accord with the principles of 
council-manager government and unless he 
is confident that he is qualified to serve to 
the advantage of the community. 

2 The city manager has a firm belief in 
the dignity and worth of the services 
rendered by government. He has a con- 
structive, creative, and practical attitude 
toward urban problems and a deep sense 
of his own social responsibility as a 
trusted public servant. 

3 The city manager is governed by the 
highest ideals of honor and integrity 
in all his public and personal relationships 
in order that he may merit the respect and 
confidence of the governing body, of other 
officials and employees, and of the public 
which he serves. He believes that personal 
aggrandizement or profit secured by con- 
fidential information or by misuse of pub- 
lic time is dishonest. 

4 The city manager as a community 
leader submits policy proposals to the 
council and provides the council with facts 
and advice on matters of policy to give the 
council a basis for making decisions on 
community goals. The city manager de- 
fends municipal policies publicly only after 
consideration and adoption of such poli- 
cies by the council. 

5 The city manager realizes that the 
council, the elected representatives of 
the people, is entitled to the credit for the 



establishment of municipal policies. The 
city manager avoids coming in public con- 
flict with the council on controversial 
issues. Credit or blame for policy execution 
rests with the city manager. 

6 The city manager considers it his duty 
continually to improve his ability 
and his usefulness and to develop the com- 
petence of his associates in the use of 
management techniques. 

7 The city manager keeps the commu- 
nity informed on municipal affairs. He 
emphasizes friendly and courteous service 
to the public. He recognizes that the chief 
function of the local government at all 
times is to serve the best interests of all the 
people on a nonpartisan basis. 

8 The city manager, in order to preserve 
his integrity as a professional ad- 
ministrator, resists any encroachment on 
his responsibility for personnel, believes 
he should be free to carry out council 

{>olicies without interference, and deals 
rankly with the council as a unit rather 
than with its individual members. 

9 The city manager handles all matters 
of personnel on the basis of merit. 
Fairness and impartiality govern the city 
manager in all matters pertaining to ap- 
pointments, pay adjustments, promotions, 
and discipline in the municipal service. 

1 C\ The city manager curries no favors. 
J-v/ He handles each problem without 
discrimination on the basis of principle 
and justice. 



THIS CODE, ORIOINALLT ADOPTED IN 1924 AND AMENDBD IN 19J8, WAS 1IVISBD AGAIN IN 1951 
AND illSOVID BT VOTE OF THE MEMBERS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CITY MANAOBRS' ASSOCIATION 







Tot 



O0W 



o^ Awkwvv Avmud l^epo^tr 




TH SIDES 
OF THE COIN 



WHERE THE MONEY CAME FROM 



1 PROPERTY TAXES 

2 FEDERAL, STATE & COUNTY AID 

3 COMMERCIAL REVENUE 

4 DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

5 PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 

6 INTEREST INCOME 

7 ALL OTHER 



$3,321,947.45 
931,692.18 
548,883.72 
195,733.28 
250,694.12 
43,851.54 
43,256.34 




Office Of The Town Manager 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 



February 15, 1965 



Fellow Citizens 



On the 
of our Town 
of the funds 
the Town at 
accounting o 
affairs whic 
people. In 
the opportun 
which their 
have been me 



following pages will 
government during the 
and programs approve 
the several Town Meet 
f the stewardship by 
h have been assigned 
particular, it gives 
ity to describe and t 
individual and collec 
t in carrying out the 



be found the story 

past year. It tells 
d by the voters of 
ings . It gives an 
Town officials of Town 
to them by the Towns - 
to these public servants 
o explain the manner in 
tive responsibilities 
will of the people. 



But just as an accounting shows the things which 
have been accomplished, it describes problems and dif- 
ficulties experienced during the past year. It looks 
forward as well as backward. It seeks to emphasize 
failures with the same sense of objectivity as it does 
successes . 

It seeks to inspire confidence in the operations of 
Town government by reporting the conduct of Town 
business in a straightforward manner. It describes many 
things which can be seen and perhaps as many which 
are not visible. It tells of people and things; of money 
and the countless intangibles which defy a price tag and 
yet play such important roles in our community living. 

The 1964 Annual Town Report seeks to live up to 
its title and above all else, to provide each of us with 
the information which is essential to the most active 
participation in Town affairs by all citizens. 



Respectfully submitted, 





RJB/b 



Richard J. Bowen, 
Town Manager 




LAST YEAR TOWN DEPARTMENTS REPORT: 

• Preparation and maintenance of voter registration 
lists on punched cards in order to provide a more modern 
and less costly system of election administration. 

• 10,576 Registered Voters as compared with 9,360 in 
1963. 



• Stocking for civil defense purposes of 2,000 emergency 
units. 

• 4,800 Hours of volunteer time by Civil Defense person- 
nel. 

• Inspections and weighings totaling more than 8,300-. 



• 361 Births, 184 Deaths and 169 Marriages. 

• Earned interest on $24,886.62 on the investment of idle 
Town funds. 

• Receipt of $250,000.00 from the Towle Estate with in- 
terest on this fund to be used for assistance to needy 
Town residents. 

• Issuance of 32,137 checks for the conduct of all finan- 
cial operations of the Town of Andover. 

• Assessed Property Valuation of $102,224,200.00. 

• Tax Exemptions granted totaling $32,498.95. 

• Property Exempt from taxation totaling $33,529,812.00. 

• Preparation by the Planning Board and adoption by 
Town Meeting of a new and more modern Zoning By- 
Law. 

• Approval of 6 subdivision plans containing 291 build- 
ing lots. 

• Police complaints totaling 2,507. 

• 194 Arrests against 270 in 1963. 

• Traffic Accidents reaching an all-time high of 397 re- 
sulting in 4 fatalities and 192 personal injuries. 



• Issuance of 175 new dwelling permits among a total 
value of permits issued in 1964 of $7,260,449.00. 

• Resurfacing of 40 miles of Town streets. 

• Installation of 26 catch basins, 5 manholes and 1,705 
linear feet of pipe for surface drainage purposes. 

• Snow Fall accumulation of 60.10 inches. 

• Setting Out of 145 shade and ornamental trees. 

• Dutch Ehn Disease in 62 trees of which 52 were cut 
down and destroyed in 1964. 

• 99% Completion of sewer project APW Mass. 46G 
involving construction of approximately 13 miles of 
sanitary sewer tines and auxiliary facilities. 



• 1,704 Communicable Disease and other public health 
cases or complaints. 

• Issuance of 776 public health permits including 138 for 
septic tanks, 295 plumbing and 147 gas. 

• Welfare Service cases totaling 204 on December 31, 1964 
as compared with 176 on January 1, 1964. 

• Disbursement of $214,974 in welfare assistance funds 
with the largest amounts going for the support of fed- 
eral and state programs. 



• 1,879 Fire Department service calls including 466 re- 
sponses to fires. 

• Fire Losses totaling an estimated $180,650.00. 

• 725 Ambulance Calls. 



• Aid to 63 veterans during 1964. 

• Elementary School Enrollment of 2,436 as compared 
to 2,023 in 1960. 

• Library Circulation increase over 1963 of 13,860. 






' Tax Collections of $3,213,293.92 or 97.2% of the 1964 
levies. 



• Addition of 4,064 books to the Memorial Hall Library 
collection. 






• Servicing of more than 12,000 Andover residents in the 
several Town recreation facilities and programs. 

• Installation of heat in the Andover Recreation Park 
Lodge. 

• Pumping of More Than 945 Million gallons of water of 
which 530.6 million gallons came from Haggett's Pond. 

• Preparation of plans and specifications for Fish Brook 
conversion dams and other related facilities. 

• $1,876.00 in lieu of tax payments made by the Andover 
Housing Authority. 



• Establishment and Operation of a more meaningful 
centralized system of purchasing Town services and 
supplies. 

• Completion of the revision of the Town By-Laws for 
submission to 1966 Town Meeting. 

• Completion of reconstruction of Lovejoy Road including 
sidewalks. 



• Granting of 32 variances by the Zoning Board of Ap- 
peals. 

• 15 Dog complaints. 

• Planning activity by the Senior High School- Building 
Committee of a $3.91 Million senior high school facility 
as approved by a Special Town Meeting in October, 1964. 

• Retirement of Advisory Personnel Board. 
PLANS FOR 1965: 




• Continuation of aggressive industrial development pro- 
gram to broaden Town's tax base and to strengthen the 
Town's general economy. 



• Development of Plans and specifications for the Ban- 
croft reservoir. 



LAST YEAR THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN: 



• Completion of plans and specifications for the Fish 
Brook water project. 



• Held 25 regular meetings, 5 special meetings and more 
than 20 informal sessions or conferences. 



• Review and Updating of Town Capital Improvement 
program. 



• Adopted more rigid and protective gravel pit operation 
regulations. 



• Analysis and establishment of Town water system and 
operations on a self-sustaining basis. 



i Received reports of the Capital Expenditure and Auto- 
mation Committees. 



• Fire Fighting Defense improvements as recommended 
in New England Fire Rating Survey Report of 1964. 



6 Establishment and Maintenance of a permanent in- 
ventory of Town-owned personal property. 



• Began implementation of recommendations of the New 
England Fire Rating Association as contained in survey 
and rating of Town fire fighting defenses. 

• Entertained some 150 visitors from England including 
residents of Andover, England. 



• Reorganization of Town Operating Departments to pro- 
mote more efficient and effective utilization of personnel 
and equipment and in accordance with sound principles 
of public administration. 

• Development and Installation of a modern centralized 
system of accounting involving the use of electronic 
data processing equipment and techniques. 

• Undertaking of second stage of Rogers Brook drainage 
project subject to State participation. 

• Acceptance of Sanborn School. 

• Acquisition of required school sites and land for other 
essential public purposes. 



• Appointed Richard J. Bowen as Town Manager on July 
20, 1964 to replace Thomas E. Duff. 

• Established a program of employee service awards to 
be made to Town employees for long and faithful service 
to the Town of Andover. 

• Reviewed the critique of Town government as prepared 
by a citizen's committee. 

• Approved the appointment of a permanent Town Engi- 
neer. 

• Concurred with the recommendation of the Town Man- 
ager in the establishment of a Permanent Public Build- 
ing Committee. 



• Adoption of more comprehensive personnel rules and 
regulations including a merit pay plan for Town em- 
ployees. 



# Adopted more formal rules of order and procedure for 
the conduct of regular meetings as well as establishing 
regular public conference or work sessions. 




Board of Selectmen 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$3,471.36 

IVjc 



In convening formally at twenty-five regular and 
five special meetings as well as having approximately 
twenty-four informal sessions, the Board of Selectmen 
completed an eventful year. In addition to acting as the 
licensing authority for the Town of Andover principally 
in the granting of alcoholic beverage licenses, the Board 
heard fourteen petitions for gravel removal permits of 
which twelve were renewals with two representing new 
requests. As a consequence of the growing concern over 
these kinds of operations, new and far more strict 
regulations were adopted and implemented by the 
Board. To date, these new requirements have resulted 
in some rather spectacular improvements in most pits. 
With a higher and more realistic schedule of fees hav- 
ing been put into effect, a more frequent and thorough 
inspection program can be continued by the Town 
Building Inspector. 

The Board received in 1964 the reports of several 
committees, most notably those of the so-called Automa- 
tion Committee and the Capital Expenditure Commit- 
tee. The former's recommendations are being carried 
forward in an article for the 1965 Town Meeting War- 
rant for funds to permit the acquisition of electronic 
data processing equipment which will modernize com- 
pletely the financial operations of the Town. The Cap- 
ital Expenditure Report is being used as a guide in 
considering future capital requirements. 

One of the most significant occurences in 1964 
which the Board of Selectmen was called upon to 
face was the receipt and implementation of the Fire 
Rating Survey conducted upon the Board's request by 
the New England Fire Rating Association. This report 
pointed out many significant fire fighting deficiencies 
which could ultimately result in higher fire insurance 
rates for Town property owners. However, immediate 
steps were taken by the Board to eliminate deficiency 
points which would involve little or no expense. Coupled 
with recommended action at the 1965 Town Meeting, 
it appears quite likely that the Town will be able to im- 
prove its fire rating. 

Another high point of the past year, was the visit 
of some 150 "neighbors" from England. Under the 
sponsorship of Southern Newspapers, Limited of South- 
hampton, England, this touring group included several 
residents of Andover, England who brought with them 
the best wishes and greetings of the Mayor of Andover. 
Aside from this attachment, Andover had been selected 



as one of the major points of interest in America to 
represent the best in a traditional, fine early American 
but nonetheless modern community. The Board of Se- 
lectmen entertained these distinguished visitors with a 
square dance and a bagpipe serenade. 

Perhaps one of the most significant actions of the 
Board of Selectmen in 1965 was the appoinment of 
Richard J. Bowen as Town Manager. Selected from a 
group of more than forty applicants, the new Town 
Manager came to Andover with a background of formal 
training in public administration and some ten years 
of practical experience in municipal administration and 
related fields, including approximately seven years as a 
municipal administrator. The Board looks to the future 
with great confidence that the administration of Town 
affairs will improve and that the benefits of such opera- 
tions will accrue to the people of the Town of Andover. 

Employee service awards were established by the 
Board in 1964 and upon receipt of the appropriate 
badges will be given to the large number of Town em- 
ployees who have served the Town over the years. This 
award program will be a continuing one and represents 
tangible recognition by the Town of the dedication and 
faithful service of its employees. Steps were taken also 
to transfer the inspection of elevators to the State which 
should prove to be a far more economical and satisfac- 
tory arrangement. The Board also approved the estab- 
lishment of a permanent public building committee as a 
step in the direction of providing continuity and ex- 
pertise to the continuing public building requirements 
of the Town. 

The Board adopted a resolution favoring meaning- 
ful home rule legislation presently before the General 
Court and has inserted an appropriate article in the 
1965 Warrant to permit voters of the Town to express 
their opinions on this critical matter. 

Another first for the Board of Selectmen was its 
participation in 1964 with the Town Manager in the 
formulation of the 1965 Town Budget. The Board also 
adopted more formal rules of order and procedure pri- 
marily in the order of business at its formal meetings. 
It also adopted and follows a policy of meeting in- 
formally on the Thursday preceeding its bi-weekly reg- 
ular meeting. This is a public meeting and has served 
to provide the opportunity to discuss openly and in de- 
tail the matters which will be considered at regular 



meetings. This arrangement has also meant a closer 
working relationship between the Board of Selectmen 
and the Town Manager. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the Town Moderator, the seven- 
member Finance Committee met regularly during 1964 
to review the periodic financial reports submitted to it 
by the Town Accountant. In addition, the FinCom met 
to consider requests for the transfer of funds from the 
Reserve Funds as established by Town Meeting to cover 
expenses not otherwise anticipated in the 1964 Annual 
Budget. These transfers totaled $32,501.78 from a re- 
serve of $35,000.00 with the major portion of this 
amount required to meet higher public welfare expenses. 
A detailed accounting of the Reserved Fund is included 
among the financial reports prepared by the Town Ac- 
countant which are part of this Town Report. 

The Finance Committee also met with the Town 
Manager in 1964 to begin consideration and review of 
the 1965 Annual Budget. 

It is worthy of note that the Andover Finance 
Committee was awarded in 1964 by the Massachusetts 
Association of Finance Committees highest honors for 
its annual report and recommendations to the voters 
of the Town, in terms of the manner and content of 
presentation. 



Town Manager 



Personnel 2 

Expenditures $20,505.73 

Monthly Cost Per Person 9V2C 



In effect, the reports of the several operating de- 
partments, boards and committees represent the report 
of the Town Manager for 1964. Comparatively new to 
the job, the five months of 1964 during which he served 
as Town Manager were spent getting acquainted and 
formulating plans and programs for the year ahead. 
Among these are the development of a more meaning- 
ful and informative annual budget; purchasing improve- 
ments; personnel programs; space utilization; electronic 
data processing and the countless other tasks which are 
part of administering the governmental affairs of the 
Town of Andover. 1965 promises many exciting oppor- 
tunities for improving the operations of Town govern- 
ment. 

Town Clerk 



BIRTHS 



1960 









326 



1961 









36 



1962 









333 



1963 









345 



1964 









Each Symbol = 30 



Personnel 


3 


Expenditures 


$12,069.74 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


5V2C 


Election and Registration 


$17,190.95 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


8c 



The first step in punch card automation has been 
started in this Department. Two Precincts are now key- 
punched, and when all precincts are completed, much 
valuable information will be available. With one set of 
records, data on street lists, voting lists, dog owners, 
etc. can be readily obtained. 

Starting with the Decennial Census as of January 
1, 1965, when every person in the town must be listed, 
population records can be determined year by year. 
This information will be used by the School Depart- 
ment to determine the number of pre-school children. 

Total numbers of Republicans, Democrats and In- 
dependents can also be ascertained in a relatively short 
time. 

The total number of registered voters in Andover 
as of October 2, 1964 was 10,576 by Precincts as fol- 
lows: 

1 — 2114 4 — 2117 

2 — 1368 5 — 857 

3 — 1854 6 — 2266 

VITAL STATISTICS 
Number of births recorded 361 



Males 
Females 



205 
156 



Number of deaths recorded 



184 



Males 94 

Females 90 

Number of marriages recorded 169 

FEES 
Fees collected and turned over to the Town Treas- 



urer 

Marriage Intentions 
Alcoholic Beverage Licenses 
Auto Dealers's Licenses 
Common Victualers' Licenses 
Certified Copies - Vital Statistics 
Uniform Commercial Code Fees 
Fish and Game License Fees 
Dog Dicense Fees 
Street Lists 
Miscellaneous Fees 
Total Fees 

Board of Assessors 



$ 368.00 

8,815.00 

125.00 

62.00 

749.00 

1,138.00 

173.25 

388.00 

314.00 

279.95 

$12,412.20 



Personnel 


Full-time 3'/ 2 




Part-time 2 


Expenditures 


$25,050.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


ll'Ac 



Number of Persons Assessed - 6,686 

Valuation-Personal Property $ 4,713.200 

Valuation-Real Estate $97,511,000 

Total Valuation $102,224,200 



18,115.65 
4,806 
GRANTED -1964 

15,215.20 

16,288.80 

792.00 

202.95 

TAXATION 

$ ,178,850 

$ ,339,350 

$ 22,235,900 

73,275 



$ 



$ 



,131,500 
1,692,225 
,135,000 
,218,275 
,906,250 
7,616,225 
2,962.74 



Tax Rate $33.00 per $1,000 Valuation 
Number of Acres Assessed 
Number of Dwellings Assessed 
TAX EXEMPTIONS 
Over 70 
Veterans 
Blind 
Miscellaneous 

REAL ESTATE EXEMPT FROM 
Clause 1 -Property of United States 
Clause 2-Property of Commonwealth 

of Mass. 
Clause 3-Property of 

Literary Organizations 
Clause 3-Property of 

Charitable Organizations 
Clause 3-Property of 

Benevolent Organizations 
Clause 11 -House of Religious Worship 

Parasonages 
Clause 12-Cemeteries 
Andover Housing Authority 
Property Put To A Public Use 
Number of Acres Exempt 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE 
Number of Vehicles Assessed 11,314 

Assessed Valuation $ 8,940,535 

Excise $517,863.66 

Abatements $ 36,539.01 

Tax Rate-$66 per $1,000 Valuation 

1965 represents the eighth year that the Assessors 
Office has functioned under the present valuation sys- 
tem. This system has proven to be accurate and fair, 
but with each passing year it has become more evident 
that a periodic review and revaluation is an absolute 
necessity in order to maintain its accuracy and fairness. 
Changing values of land and buildings are occuring 
steadily, and although the Board of Assessors continues 
to make adjustments where the need is outstanding, it 
is a physical impossibility for the Board to review 7200 
parcels. It is, therefore, the Board recommendation that 
the town schedule a professional revaluation in the year 
1967 to be effective in the tax year of 1968. 

The lack of adequate space in the Assessors Office 
has restricted, to some degree, the efficiency of the 
operation of this department, as well as having caused, 
on several occasions, an inconvenience to the taxpayer 
and others doing business with this office. The counter 
space and waiting area is insufficient, as is the general 
office area. Each year the records and volumes that are 
required by law to be retained in the Assessors Office 
increase, so that at the present time vault storage space 
is full and records that should be in a fireproof vault 
are being maintained in metal cabinets. 

There is a definite need for a separate office for 
private discussions with taxpayers and for use by the 
full-time assessor. 

Tax Collector 



Personnel 


3V 4 


Expenditures 


$17,099.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


8c 



As collections and the resulting bookwork increase 
from year to year, working office space - unfortunately - 
remains static, thus making it more and more difficult 
to operate efficiently. 

There has been no change in working area since 
1935. 

Picture, if you will, a floor area measuring 14 x 17 
ieet. In this space are crowded three desks and chairs, 
four cabinets, two typewriters, a counter -3x6- and 
the space outside the counter for taxpayers. How large 
is your living room? 

Plans are underway to re-arrange the offices on the 
first floor. While they will not and cannot solve the 
problem completely, the proposed set-up will give a 
measure of relief and allow for a little more efficient 
operation of the various departments. 

Town Treasurer 



Personnel 


2V 2 


Expenditures 


$14,961.86 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


7c 



Receipts and Disbursements General Fund: 

Balance January 1, 1964 1,087,722.48 

Receipts 6,804,652.33 



Payments 

Balance December 31, 1964 
Contributory Board of Retirement Funds: 

Balance January 1, 1964 
Receipts 



Payments (including investments) 

Balance December 31, 1964 
Accelerated Public Works Program: 

Balance January 1, 1964 
Receipts: Distribution from 
Receipts: U. S.Government 
Receipts: Income from invested funds 



Payments 

Balance December 31, 1964 



7,892,374.81 
6,568,502.84 

$1,323,871.97 

23,073.22 
156,982.32 

180,055.54 
154,307.37 



25,748.17 

794,575.65 

629,625.00 
16,413.97 



$1,440,614.62 

1,353,306.94 

$ 87,307.68 



Tax Anticipation Notes: 

Notes totalling $1,000,000 were issued at an interest 
cost of $10,365.40. 
Investment of Surplus Funds: 

Surplus funds, including Accelerated Sewer Funds, 
invested in United States Treasury Bills, certificates 
of deposit and savings accounts earned $24,886.62. 
Margaret Grindell Towle Fund: 

On October 2, 1964 the sum of $250,000 was received 
from the Executor of the Towle Will. This sum rep- 
resented $240,000 of principal and $10,000 of accrued 
income. The investment of and disbursements from 
this fund are under the direction of a board of three 
trustees. 



CHECKS ISSUE Din 1964: 




in 1963: 


Salary and Payroll 


20870 


19249 


Accounts Payable 


6217* 


6120* 


Veterans Assistance 


513 


460 


Public Assistance 


3706 


3377 


Retirement 


701 


667 


Accelerated Public Works 






Program 


130 


15 




32137 


29888 



*Typed in Office of Town Accountant. 
Andover School and Municipal Employees Federal 
Credit Union: 

This was organized in September 1964. Thirty- 
three employees joined and deductions were made from 
payroll and salary checks for shares purchased. 

It is hoped that there will be no further delay in 
providing adequate working space for the personnel of 
this office or improved record-keeping equipment, both 
of which are needed for greater efficiency of operation. 
In addition, it is strongly recommended that there be 
a review by department heads and personnel of all de- 
partments in Town Hall of present methods of operation 
both in the departments and as they relate to one an- 
other. This review should be made in advance of the 
purchase of new equipment inasmuch as the type of 
equipment and its implementations should be based on 
current as well as anticipated use. 

Planning Board 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



1 
$12,370.02 

5V 2 c 



Many hours were spent by the Board in helping 
to draft and review the new zoning by-law which re- 
placed the twenty-eight year old one. Work will con- 
tinue along the same lines until all Town By-laws have 
been recodified and placed before the voters of the 
Town for acceptance. 

Updating of the Comprehensive Master Plan, un- 
der the 701 Program (matching Federal and State 
funds), has taken much of the Planning Board's time. 
This important task has required special meetings with 
its consultants and appropriate State officials. 

At the Annual Town Meeting, voters adopted the 
Planning Board's article, which described all the busi- 
ness areas in the Town by metes and bounds as well 
as by reference to the Town Assessor's maps. The article 
also included the adoption of a large map outlining the 
business areas. 

By an overwhelming majority, the voters at the 
Special Town Meeting in June, adopted a new Zoning 
By-law, representing a major recodification, and spon- 
sored by the Planning Board and the By-law Commit- 
tee. The Board was disappointed by the defeat of a 
new section covering parking regulations, which is felt 
to be a necessary first step to a much needed revision 
of the zoning requirements of the business areas of the 
town. The Board expects to work with the Chamber 
of Commerce in projecting a parking proposal that will 
be acceptable to all parties concerned, yet stringent 
enough to protect the interests of the town. At this same 
Special Town Meeting, delineation of all boundaries by 



reference to assessors' maps became a part of the Zoning 
By-law and will serve to eliminate many problems 
which have plagued town departments over a period of 
years. 

During 1964, the Board reviewed a total of sixty- 
four (64) Form A plans (plans not requiring Planning 
Board approval) with a total of eighty-one (81) lots. 
Thirteen (13) subdivision plans were presented to the 
Board with a total of 332 lots. The Board approved six 
(6) plans with forty-one (41) lots and seven (7) plans 
with a total of 291 lots are still pending. 

Close attention has been given to the preservation 
of green areas and the protection of the Fish Brook 
water shed areas, and, under the Special Development 
Bylaw, provisions for keeping some of these critical 
areas intact have been made through close cooperation 
between the Board and developers. 



Industrial Development 
Commission 



dustries, the community relations sub-committee con- 
tacted local concerns during the year to offer our as- 
sistance in any situation wherein we might be helpful. 

From a promotional standpoint, letters were di- 
rected to key executives of a number of major corpora- 
tions throughout the country advising of the advan- 
tages to be gained through locating in Andover. While 
no direct results were achieved, replies received were 
most gratifying. It is our opinion that continuation of 
this program, coupled with judicious follow-up, may 
eventually be productive. 

During the year a number of specific leads other 
than Allied Chemical were pressed to conclusion 
through various means, including promotional letters 
and associated material, telephone calls and personal 
visitations. The Commission will continue to evaluate 
all prospects and assiduously follow up on those which 
appear appropriate. 

Board of Appeals 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$91.35 
.04c 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$1,081.24 

Vac 



During 1964, the Andover Development and In- 
dustrial Commission was able to announce the first 
tangible result of efforts to attract new industry. In 
June, it was made known that the Allied Chemical 
Corporation planned to construct a combination ware- 
house and office building in West Andover. Construc- 
tion is now planned to start in the spring of 1965. 

Recognizing that one of the Commission's prime 
concerns must be the welfare of Andover's existing in- 



During the year 1964, the twenty-ninth year of the 
Zoning By-law, the Board heard 43 cases which were 
disposed of as follows: 

32 petitions granted 
7 petitions denied 

4 petitions pending as of December 31, 1963 

A total of $320.00 was turned over to the Town 

Treasurer for advertising fees for the year ending 

December 31, 1964. 




Police Department 



Personnel 40 

(Including 10 School Crossing Guards) 
Expenditures $219,955.09 

Monthly Cost Per Person $1.02 



In 1964, three (3) permanent patrolmen were 
added to the police force making a total of twenty- 
eight (28) regular officers. There are also four (4) re- 
serve officers, two (2) civilian employees, eleven (11) 



women traffic supervisors, and two (2) police dogs. 

In 1964, 2,507 miscellaneous complaints were in- 
vestigated by the police department, an increase of 599 
over 1963. 

During the year 1964 there were 194 arrests made, 
of which 77 were for motor vehicle violations, including 
parking violations, 87 were non-traffic arrests, and 22 
were juvenile arrests. This is 76 less than 1963 when 
270 arrests were made as follows: 147 traffic arrests, 
98 non-traffic arrests, and 25 juvenile arrests. However, 
of the 147 traffic arrests in 1963, 70 were for parking 



violations, whereas only 29 were for parking violations 
in 1964. In 1962 there were 221 arrests made of which 
139 were traffic violations, 75 non-traffic, and 7 juvenile. 
Of the 139 traffic arrests in 1962, 55 were parking viola- 
tions. 

The steady decrease in parking violations reflects 
the decrease in employment at the Raytheon Plant. 
Due to the lay-offs the parking areas provided by the 
plant are sufficient to handle the cars, although a few 
are still parked on the streets. In 1963 the police de- 
partment issued 5,796 parking violation tags, while in 
1964 there were 1,926 tags issued, a drop of over 65%. 

In 1964, there were 397 traffic accidents reported 
in Andover. These accidents included 4 fatalities, 192 
personal injury accidents, and 201 property damage 
accidents. 108 of these accidents were on Rte. 28, 
or slightly over 27%. 

In 1963, there were no fatal accidents, 162 per- 
sonal injury accidents, and 174 property damage acci- 
dents. 

In 1962 there were 3 fatalities, 160 personal injury 
accidents, and 158 property damage accidents. 



During the year 1965 greater emphasis must be 
placed on moving violations. With almost a 15/2% in- 
crease in accidents for the year 1964 over 1963, it is 
evident that greater supervision of moving traffic is 
necessary. One method of accomplishing this is by the 
use of radar. The purchase of such a machine has been 
requested in the 1965 budget. 

With regard to the 108 accidents on Rte. 28,. 
twenty- three (23) took place in the area of Harding 
Street and Stevens Street. The opening of an eating 
establishment in the immediate vicinity has created 
quite a traffic problem, and coupled with the increasing 
use of Harding Street and Stevens Street, this problem 
could increase to such an extent that some considera- 
tion should be given to a change in the traffic flow by 
making Harding Street a one-way street, or the installa- 
tion of traffic lights in the area. 

In 1964, there were 345 violation notices sent to 
the Registry, as against 430 in 1963. This is a drop of 
slightly over 19%. 

During the year 1964, the police cars travelled a 
distance of 228,011 miles, as against 217,489 in 1963. 



MOTOR VEHICLE 



Accidents 



ACCIDENTS 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 







^^ 



^T*^* ^P"P^* 








1 w/'kW y^\ 



*<&?*&■ i HFFvy 




FATALITIES 



I 



= 1 

Fatality 



MM.. 

n W n f t I 



<=> O <i 



iiim 



o o ^s o 



til 



10 



Fire Department 



Personnel 


40 


Expenditures 


$282,118.97 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


$1.31 



1961 



1960 



2,800 4,700 5,000 3,300 3,000 



20 29 



146 257 195 146 156 



Year 1964 1963 1962 

Open-air Fire Permits 

Issued 

Violations Issued 

for Open-air fires 33 68 44 

Fuel Oil Burner Permits 

Issued & Inspected 

Liquified Gas Permits 

Issued and Inspected 17 33 38 41 26 

Use of Explosives Permits 

Issued 38 44 18 19 21 

Quarterly inspections required by statutes for nurs- 
ing and rest homes, hospitals and inns were carried out 
and the necessary reports made. Public and private 
school fire drills required by statutes were witnessed. 
Mercantile, industrial, church, garage and filling sta- 
tion buildings were inspected for hazards and reports 
made to owners or occupants. Dwellings of three or 
more apartments were inspected for fire prevention and 
recommendations and suggestions made to owners or 
occupants. Public and private buildings of public as- 
sembly or hall use were inspected for fire safety. 

The major cause of building fires in 1964 continued 
to be carelessness. Of a total of seventy, thirty were at- 
tributable to matches, careless smoking or misuse of 
electricity. Of some forty-eight automobile and truck 
fires, fifteen were caused by smoking. 

The New England Fire Insurance Rating Associa- 
tion report of Recommendations for Improvement of 
Fire Protection in the Town of Andover, resulting from 
their inspection of conditions made during 1964, will 
receive just consideration and action necessary to initi- 
ate the fulfillment of the recommendations offered as a 
master plan for the future improvement of fire protec- 
tion for the town. 

Civil Defense 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$1,921.96 

%c 



The State has required local CD. to proceed along 
the following lines: 

First in importance is the stocking program. An- 
dover at the present time has approximately 20,000 
units stocked with about 10,000 more spaces available 
in any emergency. 

A radiological program is just getting under way. 
When the present course is completed, we should have 
20 trained monitors. The state requirement is 90. 

We have added a new unit to our communications 
group headed by Alex Ritchie. This group still meets 
on a weekly basis. 



Auxiliary Police, under the guidance of Winston 
Briggs, has continued its training on a monthly basis. 

Rescue has acquired a used ambulance from sur- 
plus which may make a suitable rescue vehicle. 

CD personnel have contributed approximately 
4800 hours to the town this past year. 

Animal Control 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$930.00 

y 2 c 



Complaints investigated 15 

Dogs reported missing 65 

Strays cared for 22 
Dogs turned over to Harvard Medical School, 

Animal Research Center 16 

Lost dogs returned to owners 6 

Dead dogs disposed of 20 

Electrical Inspection 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$3,772.82 

l%c 



There were 553 permits issued during the year and 
categorized as follows: 

198 New Buildings wired @ $5.00 $ 990.00 

350 Additions, etc. @ $1.00 350.00 

3 Reinspections @ $2.00 6.00 

2 Void 



Fees Collected - $1,346.00 

There have been at least three (3) inspections on 

all new work and one ( 1 ) inspection for all others. In 

addition, nursing homes and day nurseries are inspected 

regularly. 



Weights and Measures 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$1,814.96 
%c 



The following items were 
weight determination. 



reweighed for actual 



Item 

Bread 


Number 
weighed 

1,013 


Correct 

316 


Under 
weight 

88 


Over 

weight 

609 


Butter, Oleo 


300 


273 


27 




Confectionery 
Fruits, Vegetables 
Liquid Commodities 


135 

1,684 

81 


121 

1,058 

63 


10 

544 

5 


4 
82 
13 


Meats, popultry, fish 
Potatoes 


2,473 
594 


2,008 
81 


262 
217 


203 
296 


Milk (cartons) 


876 


433 


96 


347 


Cheese 


258 


214 


33 


11 


Cereals 


344 


318 


2 


24 


Cookies, crackers 


195 


178 




17 


Flour 


418 


277 


77 


64 



11 



Inspections were made on the following: 
Paper or fibre cartons (marking, contents) 
Pedlers license 

Milk bottles (contents) Volumetric capacity 
Clinical thermometers (Mass. Approval Seal) 
Marking of bread & food packages per regulations 
Gasoline yump retests after initial sealing 
Inspection-fuel oil deliveries 

A total of 1,753 reweighings covering municipal 
food purchases were made by this department. 

The Department tested a total of 273 weighing or 
measuring devices, adjusting 25, sealing 245 and at- 
tached NOT SEALED labels on 3 units. 

Sealing fees amounted to $142.45. Receipts 
amounting to $131.95 were turned over to the Town 
Treasurer, whose receipt I hold. 

Building Inspection 



117 


237 


32 


14 


50 


13 


41 


2 


936 


33 


10 


12 


341 





Personnel 


lVa 


Expenditures 


$11,189.98 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


5c 



There were 519 permits of all kinds issued during 
the year and categorized as follows: 

Value 
175 New Dwellings-Garages $3,146,828 



Other Buildings 3,512,142 

Additions & Alterations 524,028 

Swimming Pools 42,150 

Signs 1,301 

New Elevators 34,000 

Razes 
Renewals 

Total Valuation - $7,260,449 

The fees collected for the year totaled $9,060.50. 

The valuation is high this year because of the new 

Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational High School, 

estimated value — $2,500,000. 

Elevators were inspected regularly. There were 27 
inspection and safety certificates issued. 

There were 90 Certificates of Occupancy issued. 
A great number of zoning and building violations 
were handled, investigated and followed up. Most of 
the violations were corrected amicably and quickly. 

The Board of Appeals applications were processed 
through this office, which necessitates preliminary 
checking prior to the public hearing. 

Gravel removal operations have been under con- 
stant inspection this year. New regulations for gravel 
removal were adopted this year by the Board of Select- 
men for use in the issuance of permits. These rules and 
regulations have benefited the Town both aesthetically 
and financially. 

All electrical permits are issued and records kept 
in this office. 



DWELLING PERMITS 



I960 



J^ff"l ™Kt m!m ™Sl JaSBfi i 



19 



1961 



™Kl SS^ jtfRi &Essk JaEsl fs i 



31 



1962 



<LaS*k sEsL JaSs-1 ™^ im&Ri Jaaal j 



151 



1963 



J^mF"! £a3==l jtfBt J^BSt jtfRt jffil JH 



165 



1964 



CITlGj 



™Kl jffiii imffEZi jtfBi .sflKt jfflKi 



175 



Each Symbol = 25 



12 




Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$37,578.09 
17c 



Highways 



Personnel 


18 


Expenditures 


$293,858.12 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


$1.35 



One third of street mileage was resurfaced by the 
highway department during the past year. This was in 
addition to regular maintenance such as patching roads, 
cleaning streets, cleaning catch basins and drainage. 
Streets that were resurfaced with 2 course type I Bi- 
tuminous concrete are Canterbury Street, Enmore 
Street, Arundel Street, Pasho Street, Avon Street, 
Stevens Street, one-half of Clark Road, and Central 
Street from Main Street to the South Church. New 
construction of roads is carried under Chapter 90. 

Sidewalks were constructed of type D-13 and type 
I Bituminous material on the following streets: Main 
Street — from Dr. Blake's to Chapel Avenue, from 
Morton Street to Chapel Avenue; Summer Street — 
from Elm Street to Whittier Street; some 400 feet on 
Clark Road. 

Guard rail posts for town highways were purchased 
to replace many broken ones. Also painted these posts 
Black and White. 

An extensive program of drainage construction 
was also completed with sizes from 12" - 21". 1705 
linear feet of pipe was laid and 26 catch basins and 5 
manholes constructed or repaired. Some of the major 
projects were located as follows: 1 — Porter Road, 2 — 
Osgood Street," 3 — Greenwood Road. These programs 
in the past have been handled by contractors. 

The bridges under control of the department of 
public works are inspected many times during the year. 

The town disposal area is also looked after by the 
highway department. 

Parks 



Personnel 


3 


Expenditures 


$17,613.92 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


8c 



The park department now has two regular size 
diamonds at Central Playstead and two Little League 
fields; one regular size diamond at Woburn Street play- 
ground and three Little League fields; and two Little 
League fields to the rear of West Center School. 

Portable bleachers are erected at the Little League 
field and football field at the Central area. 

In the Spring of the year, fertilizer is applied at 
both the Park and Playstead area. These two areas are 
rolled at this time. 

Trees 



Personnel 


6 


Expenditures 


$39,912.20 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


I8V2C 



A diversified shade tree planting program was ac- 
complished during 1964 with 145 shade and ornamental 
flowering trees being set out. Extreme drought condi- 
tions during the growing season necessitated mulching 
and watering several times. Varieties planted include 
Sugar, Norway and Crimson King Maples, Little Leaf 
Lindens, Buisman Elms, Katsuras and Sargent Flower- 
ing Cherry trees. 

Dutch Elm disease appeared in 62 public trees this 
year. Of these, 52 have been cut down and burned and 
the remainder will be removed by March at which time 
elm bark beetles emerge and transfer the disease from 
infected to healthy elms. Massachusetts Department of 
Natural Resources personnel and equipment assisted 
in Dutch Elm scouting and removal of 65 dead and 
beetle infested trees. 

A forest improvement plan in the Haggetts Pond 
watershed area was programmed and work started. This 
project consists of removal of blown-down trees, elimin- 
ation of undesirable growth and general forest improve- 
ment cutting. Work is being performed in conjunction 
with the Water Bureau Superintendent and the Essex 
County forester and will continue for several years. 

Roadside mowing, brush cutting and chemical 
brush controls was performed, along rural roads, at 
intersection and dangerous curves. Chemical eradica- 
tion of poison ivy was continued along roadsides and at 
playgrounds and recreation areas. 



13 



Approved insecticides and application methods 
were used to effect a shade tree spray program designed 
to protect public trees from destructive insects and 
diseases. D.D.T. is no longer used in Andover spray 
formulas. Effective in 1965, supervisors and spray 
equipment operators who apply pesticides must qualify 
by written examination for licenses issued by the Massa- 
chusetts Pesticide Board. 

The severe drought of 1964 affected many of An- 
dover's street trees. Many trees, particularly maples and 
oaks, showed top die back and in a large number of 
cases entire trees succumbed. Several factors adversely 
affecting street trees include lack of moisture, excessive 
use of salt on roads and black top extending up to 
trunks. It is expected more damage will appear during 
1965. 

Routine tree work of low branch removal, cabling, 
dead and dangerous tree removal, bark tracing and 
pruning was continued. Considerable dead wood is ap- 
pearing in street trees, which necessitates climbing and 
pruning each individual tree. This work is time consum- 
ing and strenuous. Therefore, a limited number of 
streets can be pruned each year. Those pruned in 1964 
include Enmore Street, Argyle Street, Riverina Road, 
Locke Street and Wheeler Street plus other areas where 
dead wood prevailed. Serious consideration should be 
given in the near future to purchase of a skyworker 
which would enable pruning and tree removal to be 
accomplished in a more economical and safer manner. 

Tree personnel worked during all ice and snow 
storms operating truck and sidewalk plows also salting 
and sanding streets and sidewalks. 



Street Lighting 



Engineering 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



1 

$9,075.42 
4c 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$37,348.85 
17c 



The Bureau was responsible for the design and 
field layout of surface water drainage projects on Porter 
Road, Osgood Street, Clark Road, and Greenwood 
Road; regrading of Canterbury Street to remove a 
drainage problem; grades for the straightening of a 
curve on Prospect Road. Plans were made for the future 
sewer connection at Camp Olympia and grades were 
provided for the rebuilding of the roadway to the main 
building. 

Field surveys were made and plans drawn for 
drainage easements, a site plan for the proposed new 
Police Station, proposed street lines at School and 
Essex Street, a sewer betterment plan for the Lowell 
Street extension beyond Lovejoy Road, a plan of the 
lots at Park Street and Florence Street, and the Town 
line at McKenney Circle. 

Plans for 13 new subdivisions of land with a total 
of 332 lots were reviewed for the Planning Board for 
conformance with their rules and regulations, and for 
the adequacy of the proposed utilities. Roadway con- 
struction and utilities were regularly inspected for the 
Planning Board in some 12 subdivisions. 

Coordination continued between the Town govern- 
ment and the County Engineers on the layout of North 
Street, the Mass. Dept. of Public Works regarding 
Chapter 90 construction on Lovejoy Road and drainage 
easements for Route 495, and the Division of Water- 
ways regarding Rogers Brook construction. 

The Bureau assisted many individuals and groups 
seeking information as to sites, existing utilities, street 
layouts, etc., As examples there were the Fire Under- 
writers, the Architects and Engineers for the proposed 
new High School, the Development and Industrial 
Commission, and the Land Acquisition Committee. 




Sewers 



Personnel 




Expenditures 


$20,032.25 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


9c 



The" feature event of the sewer program in 
was the near completion of the H.H.F.A. sewer 
ject which is 99% completed in a 74% time lapse. 



1964 
pro- 



14 



Pipe installed: 
14,212 feet 
11,187 feet 
1,369 feet 
10,370 feet 
5,678 feet 
24,968 feet 
730 feet 



24 inch 
18 inch 
15 inch 
12 inch 
10 inch 
8 inch 
6 inch 



Landfill 



Further dry sewers were laid in subdivisions in 
anticipation of new construction. 119 sewer blocks were 
cleared. 56 dwellings were connected. 39 of these were 
in the new sewer area. 

SEWER PROJECT A.P.W. MASS. - 46 G 

D 



TO LAWRENCE a 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Personnel 


1 


Expenditures 


$11,961.86 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


5'/2C 


Garbage Contract 




Expenditures 


$25,000.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


ll'Ac 



\ TO HAVERHLL 

-A 1 LAWRENCE 




15 



Board of Health 



Personnel 


Full-time 2 
Part-time 2 




Expenditures 


$23,083.15 




Monthly Cost Per Person 




lOVic 




Communicable Disease Cases Reported 






1964 


1963 


1962 


Dog Bites 


120 


64 


62 


Tuberculosis 


1 


4 


2 


Scarlet Fever 


13 


30 


22 


Chicken Pox 


67 


37 


304 


Whooping Cough 





1 


1 


Measles 


46 


5 


183 


Mumps 


307 


98 


6 


Syphilis 











Infectious Hepatitis 


4 


5 


3 


Meningitis, Influenzal 








1 


Meningitis, Aseptic 


1 








Meningitis, Meningoccocal 





1 





Meningitis, undetermined 


1 








German measles 


1130 


32 


38 


Gonorrhea 


1 





1 


Salmonellosis 


1 








Dysentery, Bacillary 


1 








Rabbit Bite 





1 





Squirrel Bite 


1 








Racoon Bite 


1 








Licenses & Permits Issued 






Septic Tank 


138 


156 


142 


Maintenance of Piggeries 


9 


10 


8 


Poultry Slaughtering 








1 


Agencies Giving Day Care to Children 3 


4 


4 


Mfg. Ice Cream & Frozen Desserts 


8 


6 


6 


Milk 


83 


84 


80 


Oleo 


30 


34 


31 


Pasteurization of Milk 


4 


4 


4 


Recreation Camps 


2 


1 


2 


Garbage & Refuse 


19 


24 


23 


Swimming Pool 


17 


8 


10 


Motel 


1 


1 


1 


Massage 


3 


4 


2 


Funeral Director 


7 


7 


7 


Farm Labor Camps 


7 


5 




Plumbing Permits 


295 


253 


217 


Gas Permits 


147 


69 




Burial Permits 


3 








Premature Babies Born 



Premature Babies Born 

No. Given 

Financial Assistance 
Cost to Town 
TB Patients Admitted 
to Hospital 

Discharged from Hospital 



1964 

17 



3 
$780. 



1963 

19 

1 
$216. 

5 

5 



1962 
12 

2 

$307.65 

2 

1 



Cost to Town 

Money Received from 

Permits & Licenses 



$2447.80 $4674.00 $2110.50 

$3866.00 $3435.50 $2797.00 

97 

16 

148 

3 

28 

15 

3 

9 

174 



No. Food Handling Establishment Inspections 

No. Water Samples Taken & Analyzed 

No. Swab Tests 

No. Bacterial Tests 

No. Ice Cream, Milk & Cream Samples 

No. Farm Labor Camp Inspections 

No. Recreational Camp Inspections 

No. Piggery Inspections 

Complaints Investigated 

Site Inspections for 

Sewage Disposal System Installations 140 

Site Inspections for Swimming Pool Installations 14 

Gas Inspections 152 

Plumbing Inspections 311 

Sewage Disposal System Installations Approved 121 
Sewage Disposal System Installations Rejected 24 

Excavations & Fill for 

Sewage Disposal Installations Checked 19 

Subdivision plans submitted for approval 8 

No. Day Care Center Inspections 12 

No. Hospital Inspections 2 

No. Nursing Home Inspections 4 

Field visits, including case findings were made on 
all patients and contacts of communicable diseases. 
Premature Babies and Crippled Children program was 
carried on as usual. 

The largest number of contagious diseases on rec- 
ord was reported to the health office during the past 
year. This high incidence of communicable disease was 
noted throughout the state. 



16 



Due to the increased building in unsewered areas 
in the past few years, the Board of Health in March 
adopted rules and regulations relative to the suitability 
of soil for individual sewage disposal systems in sub- 
divisions. These regulations will enable the developer 
to have knowledge of any area in the sub-division that 
might not meet the requirements for building homes. 
Andover is the first town in Massachusetts to enact 
such regulations. 

All day care centers for children are now operating 
under new State regulations. Authority to license these 
centers has been delegated to the Andover Board of 
Health. 

New State regulations regarding payment for hos- 
pitalization of premature babies went into effect this 
year. Determination of settlements has been eliminated 
and assistance is available to all eligible residents. Un- 
der the new changes the town is reimbursed for one- 
half the total expenses incurred. 

Article VI "Minimum Standards for Swimming 
Pools" has been added to the State Sanitary Code. All 
public and semi-public pools must now be licensed an- 
nually. 

The following clinics approved by the Board of 
Health were made available to the public:- 

Annual rabies clinic, conducted by Dr. Richard 
Lindsay — 600 dogs inocculated. 

Adult polio clinic, conducted by Junior Chamber 
of Commerce — 250 doses of polio vaccine distributed. 

Oral cancer clinic, first in Andover, conducted by 
Dr. Richard Secord — 50 individuals screened 



Essex Sanatorium was closed by the State Depart- 
ment in July but a clinic for follow-up of tubercular 
patients has been established in Lawrence. This should 
prove to be much more convenient for individuals re- 
quiring chest x-rays. 

New State isolation and quarantine regulations of 
diseases declared to be dangerous to the public health 
became effective in August, 1964. The new regulations 
are less rigid on some diseases and more stringent on 
others. 

Animal Inspection 



Personnel 


Part-time 1 


Expenditures 


$600.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


.3c 



Number 



Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 



of cattle inspected: 

Registered 

Grade 

of sheep inspected 

of horses inspected 

of goats inspected 

of swine inspected 

of barns inspected (dairy) 

of dogs quarantined 

of dogs with Rabies 



104 
96 



200 

19 

75 

2 

973 

10 

87 






Personnel 


2 


Expenditures Gross ■ 


■ $117,551.91 


Net - 




Monthly Cost Per Person 


54c 



The Board of Public Welfare met regularly during 
the year, maintaining a full knowledge of the depart- 
ment's affairs and making recommendations to the Di- 
rector and to the Town Management regarding the 
internal management of the Department of Public As- 
sistance. The Board also became involved in discussions 
about particular cases, and assisted the Department of 
Public Assistance personnel in so far as they could be 
in the handling of problem cases and problem expendi- 



tures. 

The Department of Public Assistance opened the 
year 1964 with 65 Old Age Assistance cases, 36 Medical 
Assistance for the Aged cases, 13 Aid to Dependent 
Children cases, 14 Disability Assistance cases, 2 General 
Relief cases, and 1 Cuban Refugee case. This accounted 
for a total of 176 people being served in January of 
1964. 

December, 1964 wound up the year with 64 Old 
Age Assistance cases, 45 Medical Assistance for the 
Aged cases, 14 Aid to Dependent Children cases, 17 
Disability Assistance cases, 7 General Relief cases, and 
1 Cuban Refugee case. This caused the department to 



17 



serve a total of 204 persons. 

Of the total of $214,974 disbursed by the depart- 
ment during the year, 33.2% was for Old Age Assist- 
ance; 35.2% for Medical Assistance for the Aged; 8.9% 
for Disability Assistance; 12.1% for Aid to Dependent 
Children: and the balance of 10.6% for General Relief 
and Cuban Refugee care. 

It can be noted from these percentages that the 



two major medical programs of Medical Assistance for 
the Aged and Disability Assistance accounted for 44.1% 
of the total expenditure for the year 1964, and 68.4% 
of the total disbursements were made on behalf of the 
aged. 

Other pertinent information regarding the opera- 
tions of the department and its growth can be found in 
the comparative statistics for the years 1960 through 
1964 as part of this report. 



EXPENDITURES 



TOTAL (Gross) 
Administration 
Federal Reimbursement 
Town Furnished Funds 
State Reimbursement to 
Free Cash 
Recoveries 
Net Cost to Town 



1960 

$152,506.99 
11,835.03 
56.773.26 
95,733.73 

43,400.79 
15,541.52 
27,859.27 



1961 

$149,998.63 
12,662.87 
70,298.43 
79,700.20 

34,663.89 
19,037.58 
25,998.73 




Under Chapter 115, General Laws of Massachu- 
setts, the Veterans Service Department provided finan- 
cial assistance to veterans, their dependents or surviv- 
ors, because of old age, sickness or hospitalization. No 
assistance was provided to any recipient during 1964 be- 
cause of unemployment alone, due to the cooperation of 
local employers and State and Federal agencies in help- 
ing to place unemployed applicants. 

The work load of this office increased considerably 
in 1964 as a result of new legislation concerning benefits 
to eligible veterans and their families, and the reopen- 
ing of National Life Insurance to veterans of World 
War II and the Korean Conflict. Information and as- 
sistance were given to more than 1100 individuals dur- 
ing the year relative to Veteran's Administration bene- 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$2,079,585.77 
$9.63 



1962 

$171,946.51 
14,580.51 
83.014.23 
88,932.28 

40,296.38 

4,050.58 

48,635.90 



1963 

$183,710.21 

15.248.36 

100.967.75 

84,742.46 

53,422.76 

2.680.00 

28,639.70 



1964 

$214,973.24 

18,511.39 

108,149.37 

106,823.87 

60,374.20 
13.868.71 
32,580.96 




Personnel 
Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Gross 
Net ■ 



$39,648.49 



18c 



fits such as hospitalization, pensions, education, home 
loan guaranty, aid and attendance, death benefits, grave 
markers, burial flags and all other applications and 
forms. Thirty three (33) Andover veterans died in 1964 
as follows:- Fourteen — World War I; Eighteen — 
World War II; and One Korean Campaign veteran. 

Expenditures for medical care and hospitalization 
increased substantially this year, and it appears that 
these costs will continue in an upward trend for the 
forseeable future. 

We extend a sincere thank you to the Andover 
Red Cross, all local churches, veterans organizations, 
charitable groups and the South Lawrence Associates 
for their cooperation in assisting all worthy cases. 







18 



SCHOOL POPULATION 



1963 



4,120 



1964 



4,368 



1965 
(EST.) 



1970 
(EST.) 



1976 
(EST.) 




5,780 



6,299 



Each Symbol = 500 

The School Department takes this opportunity to 
review progress and needs in a section of the Town 
Report. A detailed discussion of purely educational 
topics is contained in t he separate School Department 
pamphlet which is available to all taxpayers. 

The School Committee is extremely conscious of 
its responsibility to work cooperatively with other Town 
departments in the interests of economy in government. 
At the same time, the School Committee has a respon- 
sibility to conduct its educational program in accord- 
ance with the laws of the Commonwealth that delegate 
responsibility for the operation of schools to School 
Committees operating as an arm of state government. 

The School Committee continues to express grave 
concern over the lack of land sites for future elementary 
school buildings. 

Elementary school population in Andover has in- 
creased from 2,023 students in 1960 to 2,436 students 
in 1964. The total capacity for the present Andover 
elementary school buildings is approximately 2,750 stu- 
dents. With the annual increase reaching as high as 120 
elementary students, the need for additional elementary 
school space is immediate and pressing, and one addi- 
tional elementary school building will be required by 
1968 or earlier. 

On numerous occasions, the Selectmen and Town 
Manager were informed about the urgent need for 
building sites. We urge that sites for schools be acquired 
with all possible dispatch. The School Committee will 



be glad to assist in any manner to achieve this goal. 

The problem of providing additional secondary 
school space occupied a major part of the School Com- 
mittee's attention during 1964. 

In February, the Committee formally transmitted 
the Educational Specifications for the new high school 
to the Selectmen, Town Manager, and the School Build- 
ing Committee. This document, prepared by the School 
Department Administrators, and approved by the 
School Committee, specified in detail the space and fa- 
cilities required for a quality high school curriculum. 

In April, the Committee provided a revised esti- 
mate of future junior high school and high school en- 
rollments. The figures were in part as follows: 

Junior High School High School 
1968 1131 1070 

1970 1273 1117 

1972 1327 1232 

The original recommendation of the Committee 
was for a high school for 1500 students. The Building 
Committee evaluated the overall problem, and arrived 
at the decision to construct a high school for 1200 stu- 
dents, with core facilities for 1800. In July, the School 
Committee formally voted to support this plan. 

Numerous meetings have been held with the School 
Building Committee, and agreement has been reached 
on all essential points. In addition, the Administrators 
spent many hours with the Building Committee and 



19 



Architect to provide advice and assistance. 

The Committee supported and assisted the Build- 
ing Committee at Public Hearings and at the Special 
Town Meeting. 

Following approval of the plan, less auditorium, 
and appropriation of $3,910,000 for the building, the 
Committee revised its Educational Specifications. Con- 
sistent with the vote at Town Meeting, the Committee 
recommended that the auditorium be deferred, and 
that certain minor changes be made in the room sizes 
and arrangements to permit certain savings to the 
Town. 

The School Committee and Administrators plan 
to continue close cooperation with the School Building 
Committee to assure that the final high school building 
will be the best for the education of the children of 
Andover. The importance of using all dispatch in con- 
structing the new building cannot be over-emphasized 
if double sessions and serious decline in our educational 
program are to be avoided. 

The School Committee wishes to emphasize to 
townspeople the importance of providing adequate 
sidewalks in the various approach areas to our elemen- 
tary schools. We urge the Town to appropriate sufficient 
funds for this purpose and encourage the Town Man- 
ager to continue his policy of building sidewalks on 
dangerous roads near schools. 

The recently constructed Sanborn School is an 
outstanding educational facility. Full utilization of this 
resource by the residents of West Andover will not be 
possible, however, until sufficient funds are provided to 
complete the play area in the rear of the school. The 
School Committee hopes that the Town will use its 
resources to complete this play area during 1965. 

The School Department is anxious to eliminate the 
tremendous amount of duplication in recordkeeping 



which exists in various departments at this time. We 
believe that the purchase of semi-automatic accounting 
equipment will serve to reduce costs for the Town as 
a whole if a thorough systems analysis is made of the 
needs of the various departments. We believe that this 
analysis will require considerable time and, for this 
reason, have decided to support the temporary rental of 
a conventional bookkeeping machine until a central- 
ized accounting system can be installed and made op- 
erative. The rental of this equipment will not only per- 
mit timely completion of school reports required by law, 
but will also help to prevent an increase in our clerical 
staff. 

The School Committee for the past eight years has 
worked closely with the Selectmen and Town Manager 
in the interests of establishing a unified personnel policy 
for non-educational personnel employed by. the School 
Department. We are currently participating in the re- 
evaluation of such positions in the School Department 
under the direction of the Town Manager. This is an- 
other example of sensible cooperation between the 
School Department and other departments of the Town 
in the interests of harmonious working relationships 
with Town employees. 

The School Committee recognizes the authority of 
the Town Manager in connection with the purchase of 
non-educational items in the School Department 
budget. We have consistently expressed our willingness 
to respond to specific direction in this area. On some 
items, such as the purchase of fuel oil, satisfactory ar- 
rangements have been working for some time. 

Townspeople are conscious of the wide use made 
of school buildings and grounds for non-educational 
purposes. It is the policy of the School Committee to 
continue its practice of encouraging appropriate use of 
these facilities for the benefit of the Town as a whole. 




Personnel 




Expenditures 


$113,630.96 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


53c 




During 1964 in consultation with the architectural 
firm of Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbott and 
with the library's building consultant, Joseph E. 
Wheeler, the proposed plans for the library addition 
were reviewed and refined. Elevation drawings were 
prepared. This addition to the South and West of the 



present building is needed to alleviate the badly over- 
crowded conditions in the adult and young adult de- 
partment which has seen no physical expansion since 
1927. 

The expansion will contain two floors, one a street 
level, the other at basement level which will result in 



20 




LIBRARY CIRCULATION 



201,265 



182,860 




^-a 



168,811 



170,073 



— 1 



Tf 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



10,358 square feet of new and altered space. With this 
expansion, the total library facility will seat 150 people 
and have capacity for 100,000 books. 

A provisional grant of $85,000 or 25% of the total 
project cost of $340,000 has been made to the library 
under the federal Library Services and Construction 
Act. Voter approval will be sought at the March town 
meeting. If it is not gained, the federal grant is for- 
feited. 

The Eastern Regional Public Library System was 
expected to be in operation by the end of 1964. The 
date has been advanced to 1965 for organizational rea- 
sons. The Memorial Hall Library will serve as one of 
the geographical sub-regional centers in the system. 

Library circulation was up 13,860 over 1963 with 
most of the gain registered in the number of books cir- 
culated from the elementary school libraries. 

Since circulation is only one measuring rod of use, 
a tally of informational and reference questions was 
kept during October and November. These averaged 
more than 2,000 a month with the October total of 
2,762. Spot checks will be made seasonally for purposes 
of comparisons. 

4,064 books were added, 575 more than in 1963. 
1,816 books were added to the elementary school libra- 
ries. National Defense Education Act funds of $1043 
on a matching basis were sought and secured for the 
purchase of science books for these libraries. Continu- 
ously rising prices tend to offset the larger book bud- 
gets for both public and school libraries. 



The Library bought all the department manuals 
published by the International City Managers' Associa- 
tion, a significant step in developing a municipal gov- 
ernment collection. 

Some Library Facts: 113 groups borrowed 103 
16mm films which were seen by 29,703 people. 554 film 
strips and slides were also borrowed. 460 framed prints 
were loaned in 1964, with a high of 54 in January and 
a low of 16 in August. The library owns a total of 82 
framed prints. 

— ■ 151 adult and children's recordings were pur- 
chased during the year. A grant of $230 from the Fut- 
terman Fund was used to strengthen the adult record 
collection. Total recordings number 1,233. 

— 2,134 new borrowers were added to the library's 
rolls, 1508 of them adult and young adult; 626, children. 

— 139 books were borrowed for library users from 
other libraries and 118 books were loaned by this library 
to other libraries. 

— 20 school classes, ranging from pre-school 
through ninth grade, visited the library for story tell- 
ing, book introduction, instruction in library use and 
practice in locating materials for school assignments. 

— ■ 25 story hours were held in 1964 and 36 meet- 
ings of the pre-school groups familiarly known as the 
"Littlest Listeners." 

— 20 different outside groups used the library 
meeting rooms in 1964. 

— More than 2,000 books were withdrawn from 
the collection because they were worn out, no longer 
of interest, or because information was obsolescent or 
no longer accurate. Those of continuing value were re- 
placed by new editions and up-to-date information. 

— The Public Library and Public School Joint 
Committee on Libraries made real progress in its ex- 
ploration of more effective ways of inter-library co- 
operation. 

— A one page suestionnaire on library use, ad- 
ministered in the Memorial Hall Library adult and 
young adult department by members of the Andover 
League of Women Voters, for ten days during April, 
revealed interesting patterns of use. 

— 1474 people filled out the questionnaire. Of 
these 55% were students, 23% housewives and 5% 
teachers. All others numbered 17%. 

— ■ There was an average of 1,300 users weekly 
in the main reading room for adults and young adults. 

— 478 came for a "good book." 487 came for 
information for personal and business use. 408 came 
for material for a course. 

— 61% of all adult and young adult users re- 
ported that the Memorial Hall Library was their chief 
source of material for reading and study. 

— 67% indicated that they use the library at least 
once or twice a month, with 38 indicating once a week 
or oftener use. 

If the library has a problem, it is how to balance 
student and adult use. Present physical conditions make 
it impossible to do more than try to ameliorate the sit- 
uation. In the adult department the saturation point 
of use has almost been reached except for morning and 
early afternoon hours. 

Library conduct on the part of students has, on 
the whole, improved. Stricter policy as to what consti- 



21 



tutes reasonable behavior, rearrangement of the read- 
ing room, the scheduling of a monitor during evening 
hours have contributed to this improvement. 

Book mutilation and book theft are still problems. 
However, the use of a copying machine is being en- 
couraged to cut down on the incidence of mutilation 
and theft. 

Margaret Manning, Assistant Librarian and a 
member of the staff for many years, retired at the end 
of September. During her association with the library, 
she built much of herself and her talents into the li- 
brary fabric. Mrs. Jean Vint, a graduate of the Sim- 
mons College Graduate Library School and an experi- 
enced librarian, succeeded her. 

The library still has the position of Assistant in 
Children's Work to fill. A part-time assistant was hired 
lor the school library program. 

Professional staff members attended library meet- 
ings and participated on professional book reviewing 
committees to the benefit of the library's program. 

Highlights of the library program were the No- 
vember Open House which brought out 250 people and 
the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth which was 
observed with special displays, a booklist and program. 
About 60 boys and girls attended a dramatization of 
scenes from Macbeth put on by South Elementary 
School students in the library hall. 

Among gifts from organizations and individuals 
received during the year were a bequest for the pur- 
chase of books of literary value from the estate of John 
C. Moynihan, a long-time appreciative library user; 
sixty recordings from Columbia Records; the Futterman 
Fund gift already mentioned; and generous gifts of 
money from the Andover Evening Study Program and 
the Andover Council of Churches. The Library notes 
with appreciation the many gifts of books by individuals 
and the increasing number of gifts of money for books 
in memory of a friend or relative. 

The Girl Scout Troop at the Sanborn School once 
again planted bright yellow marigolds around the base 
of the library flag pole. 

Mention should be made, too, of the generous 
press coverage of library services and events. 

A significant improvement in the condition of the 
library plant was accomplished with the redecoration 
of the Memorial Hall which has long been a horrendous 
exception to an otherwise well maintained library build- 
ing. 

If prophecy is permitted, the year 1965 could be 
one of the most important in the library's long history. 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

1873 




ANDOVER 
MASSACHUSETTS 




Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Full-time 1 

$39,580.25 

18c 



5.44 


30 


1.2 


1 


1 


.7 


1 


.8 



The aim of the Recreation Department is, "to 
make available areas and facilities suitable to the leisure 
time needs of the people of the community". These 
areas and facilities to be developed and maintained in 
an efficient and economical manner for use by local 
groups to develop their own activities through guidance 
by the Department. They are also to be used by the 
Department for activities when no other leadership is 
available. 

LAND AREAS CONTROLLED BY THE 
DEPARTMENT IN ACRES 

total area usable area 
Andover Recreation Park 
Ballardvale Playground 
Indian Ridge Playground 
Shawsheen Playground 

LAND AREAS CONTROLLED BY OTHER 
MUNICIPAL DEPARTMENTS OR OWNED 
PRIVATELY — USED BY THE 
RECREATION PROGRAM 
Central Park 3.92 

Central Playstead 18.5 

High School 8+ 

Phillips Academy 8+ 

South School 20.5 

West School 11.8 

Hussey's Pond 3.83 

OTHER FACILITIES 
The lighted court areas on the Ballardvale and 
Central Playgrounds are prepared for skating, weather 
permitting. 

BUILDINGS UNDER DIRECT CONTROL OF 
THE DEPARTMENT 



Year Round Use 
Summer Only 



Andover Recreation Park 
Andover Recreation Park 
Ballardvale Playground 
Indian Ridge Playground 
Shawsheen Playground 



1 150 
6 E&S 
1 E&S 
1 E&S 
1 E&S 
(E&S — Emergency shelter and storage room only) 
BUILDINGS USED BY THE DEPARTMENT 
THROUGH ARRANGEMENTS WITH OTHER 
DEPARTMENTS FOR PROGRAM OR STORAGE 
These include the Stowe School, Jackson School, 
Town Hall, Library, Junior High School, High School, 
West School, Bradlee School and the Ballardvale Fire 
Station. 



22 






DEVELOPMENT 
POMPS POND 

Beach Area: Widened area between piers to in- 
corporate more wading area. 

Piers: Rebuilt and floated on Cellulite. 

Large Float: Rebuilt and floated on Cellulite. 

Bobber Lines: Replaced hemp rope with nylon 
and wood bobbers with Cellulite. 

Boat: Purchased one new Lifesaving boat. 

Drain: Constructed drainage gutter to prevent 
beach erosion. 

Re-Locate Entrance: Survey and Construction by 
U S. Marine Corps. 
ANDOVER RECREATION PARK: 

Combination storm windows installed on Lodge 
courtesy of the Andover Duplicate Bridge Club. 

Playground Equipment purchased by the Andona 
Society. 

Fluorescent lights for the Lodge courtesy of C. 
Lincoln Giles. 

Entrance and Parking Lot started in conjunction 
with the accelerated sewer project and developed 
through Article 24 - 1964. 

Interion Paneling in the Lodge - Article 24 - 1964. 

Sanitary Facilities installed in the Lodge courtesy 
of Andover Teen Center. 

Heating System installed in the Lodge - Article 24 
1964. 

Sliding Area developed through a work bee of pri- 
vate citizens. 

Furniture for the Lodge donated by the Andover 
Teen Center, Coffee Mill and the Shawsheen Woman's 
Club Furniture Drive. 
BALLARDVALE PLAYGROUND: 

Grading and seeding parts of the grounds. 

Installation of a fence for the safety of the children. 
GENERAL: 

Donation of eleven Micro-wave Boxes by Western 
Electric for use in outdoor storage of playground equip- 
ment. 

PROGRAM ATTENDANCE 
WINTER - Eight-Week Adult Program: 

high low average 

Bridge 35 5 12 

Investments 14 6 10 

Physical Fitness 15 8 12 

French 8 3 5 

POMPS POND - 1 1 week program 

high low average 

Classes 500 9 147 

Free Swim 3280 3 314 

PLAYGROUNDS - 8 week program 
Andover Rec. Park 60 7 18 

Ballardvale 115 4 50 

Central 150 9 72 

Indian Ridge 38 5 16 

Shawsheen 175 8 59 

West 75 10 35 

PROGRAM: 
POMPS POND: 

The method of grouping classes was changed this 
year from mass instruction to the Station Method. 

Red Cross methods were used in teaching Begin- 
ners, Advanced Beginners, Intermediates, Swimmers, 
Advanced Swimmers, Junior Life Savers and Senior 



Life Savers. 

Special events included the Playground Swim 
Meet, Little Three Swim Meet, Band Concert, Red 
Cross Day Demonstration and Little Three All-Stars 
vs. Allicon Pool Champs in Lawrence. 
PLAYGROUNDS: 

The Andover Recreation Park was used for the 
first time this Year as a playground. It was the only 
area that could remain in operation in spite of rainy 
weather. However, the program was limited because of 
construction during the season. It was also impossible 
to get the playground equipment until late in the Sum- 
mer because of a hold-up in the manufacturer's pro- 
duction. 

Special emphasis was placed on expanding the 
programming potential of the smaller playgrounds by 
encouraging leaders to use neighboring facilities. This 
included fishing trips to neighboring ponds and use of 
nearbv athletic fields for sports. 

The program on the playgrounds were developed 
around weekly themes, tournaments and special events. 
This included a variety of activities such as Doll and 
Stuffed Animal Shows, Scavanger Hunts, Baking Con- 
tests, Sport Tournaments and a Field Day. Highlight- 
ing the Summer was the traditional trip to Canobie 
Lake Park. 

The Twilight Baseball League, Summer Basket- 
ball League and the Andover Softball League were 
again organized for Teens and Adult Recreation. 
NOTE: 

Attendance in all Summer activity was low this 
summer because of adverse weather conditions. 30% of 
the scheduled program hours included cool and incle- 
ment weather while 15% of the time it rained. 
SPACE REQUIREMENTS: 

Additional demands were made for softball dia- 
monds and playgrounds during the year. Although one 
additional diamond is being developed at the Andover 
Recreation Park, more areas are needed. Installing 
lights on existing ball fields will help solve the one 
need. However, the mainteance program will have to be 
further increased and additional land acquired or de- 
veloped to solve the playground situation. It should be 
noted that only one of the areas controlled by the 
Recreation Department meets the 1.75 acre require- 
ment for a softball diamond or the 4+ requirement for 
adequate playground area. 
SUMMARY: 

Much was done throughout the year to provide 
the Town with facilities that can be used on a year- 
round basis. Most of the development was done in the 
Andover Recreation Park-Pomps Area. Much has to be 
done in the future to develop the maintenance program 
for the upkeep of all areas. 



23 



WATER 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



14 
$156,668.45 

72Vic 




•54 "55 '56 '57 58 '59 '60 '61 "62 '63 '64 



WATER SYSTEM SUMMARY 



Year 


Water 


Water Annual Pumping Service 


Meters 


Hydrants 


Miles 




Committments 


Bills All Sources Pipes 
Million Gals. in use 


in use 




of 
Main 
Pipe 


1940 


$ 52,241.14 


5,518 


414,653 2,653 


2,587 


728 


79.89 


1950 


67,871.62 


6,636 


546,313 3,202 


3,172 


815 


91.73 


1960* 


194,880.75 


9,177 


807,115 4,418 


4,368 


865 


113.74 


1964 


237,490.36 


10,354 ■ 


945,501 5,116 


5,072 


1,084 


128.05 


*Increase 


in Water Rates 


January 2, 1959 approx- 








imately 30% 






1964 WATER 


PUMPING REPORT 








ABBOT 


BALLARDVALE 


WOOD 


HAGGETTS 




MONTH 




WELL 


WELLS 


HILL 


POND 


TOTAL 


January 




11,160,000 


25,820,000 


5,453,000 


19,590,000 


62,023,000 


February 




10,440.000 


23,650,000 


5,226.000 


20,970,000 


60,286,000 


March 




11,160,000 


9,140,000 


5,718,000 


40,120,000 


66,138,000 


April 




10,800,000 




4,915,000 


49,500,000 


65,215,000 


May 




10,750,000 


7,030,000 


7,215,000 


71,780,000 


96,775,000 


June 




10,780,000 


25,810,000 


11,558,000 


67,100,000 


115,248,000 


July 




11,100,000 


14,780,000 


8,111,000 


57,820,000 


91,811,000 


August 




11,100,000 


12,650,000 


8,779,000 


58,770,000 


91,299,000 


September 




10,630,000 


12,100,000 


8,120,000 


52,670,000 


83.520,000 


October 




10,900,000 


12,410,000 


6,631,000 


40.390,000 


70,331,000 


November 




10.490,000 


27,020,000 


2,030,000 


31,150,000 


70,690,000 


December 




9,500,000 


30,720,000 


11,145,000 


20,800,000 


72,165,000 






128,810,000 


201,130,000 


84,901,000 


530,660,000 


945,501,000 



Both the Prospect Hill and Wood Hill Reservoirs 
were cleaned and painted. 3,254 feet of 8" main and 
785 feet of 12" main with 5 hydrants were laid under 
contract. In various subdivisions, 9,524 feet and 24 
hydrants were added. 

Under state highway construction (Route 495), 
992 feet of 10" pipe and 185 feet of 12" pipe were 
installed. 

Maintenance 
180 New services 
86 Taps only in subdivisions 
166 Services renewed for Highway construction 
8 Services renewed 
1 1 Hydrants moved under Chapter 90 
52 Hydrants repaired 
7 Hydrants replaced 

Open reservoir at Prospect cleaned and repaired 
14 Gates added 
421 Special meter readings 
132 Minor leaks repaired 



17 Breaks fixed 
575 Special calls other than above 
189 New meters installed 
85 Meters repaired 

25 Field meters removed, checked and reset 
A program of adjusting gate boxes and various 
other adjustments was instituted to concur with the fire 
underwriter's requirements. 

Under a federal grant, over 50% of the study for 
the Fish Brook supply was completed. 

In 1965, a request has been made for the extension 
of the 12" main on Dascomb Road to the industrial 
area. The greatest need in the near future is the con- 
struction of the Fish Brook supply and an adequate 
reservoir at Bancroft. This reservoir was drawn 
dangerously low several days in the hot dry weather 
in 1964. The water bureau will set up a special ac- 
acounting system in 1965 to enable the public to truly 
analyze all fiscal aspects of the operation. 



24 




Personnel 


5 


Expenditures 


$25,325.21 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


1T/2C 



The Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit 
their Annual Report for the year of 1964. 

During the year the Cemetery sold 40 new lots and 
had 83 interments. The number of interments was the 
same as the previous year but there was an increase of 
15 lots over the number sold last year. From the per- 
petual care payments on these sales and from payments 
made by three older lot owners who have now placed 
their lots under the perpetual care a total of $5,814.00 
was turned over to the Town Treasurer to be added to 
our Perpetual Care Fund. This fund now totals 
$151,945.00 and income amounting to $6,131.05 was 
received from it in 1964. This income can be used to 
reduce the cost of operating the Cemetery if desired. 

A total of $4,262.73 was received from the sale of 
new lots, interments, vault sales, foundation charges, and 
from the care of lots not under perpetual care. This 
sum and the income from the Perpetual Care Fund 
$10,393.78. This income was turned over to the Town 
Treasurer and by so doing reduced the cost to the Town 
of operating the cemetery by that amount. 



Perpetual Cares 



Number of Balance 

Accounts Jan. 1, 1964 

Spring Grove 1149 $151,978.39 

South Church 143 18,623.13 

Christ Church 71 7,610.00 

West Parish Church 10 2,281.33 

St. Augustine's Church 6 650.00 

Total 1379 $181,142.85 

Post War Rehabilitation $ 28,005.42 

Stabilization 50,960.24 
♦This includes $544.00 in General Cash 



Deposits 

♦5,814.00 
87.80 



$5,901.80 



Special 



$50,000.00 



Interest 


Withdrawals for 
Care of Lots 


Balance December 
31, 1965 


$6,131.05 


$6,131.05 


$157,792.39 


1,017.09 


976.75 


18,751.27 


320.26 


320.26 


7,610.00 


92.00 


265.52 


2,107.81 


27.36 


27.36 


650.00 


$7,587.76 


$7,720.94 


$186,911.47 


$1,131.40 




$ 29,136.82 


3,248.22 




104,208.46 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

1964 was the fourteenth full year of occupancy of 
the Veterans' Housing Project and fifth full year of 
occupancy for the Elderly Housing Project. 

Thomas R. Wallace, member of the board since 
1952, was re-elected in March to serve a five year term. 

Major replacements and maintenance this year 
for the Veterans' Project were: replacement of two 
refrigerators $224.25 and three electric ranges $214.88; 
replacement of boiler $4,600; repairs to heating system 

$1,077.31; repairs to hot-water system $1,300.08. For 
the Elderly Project: Complete exterior painting $1,660. 

Maintenance problems anticipated for the coming 
year, Veterans' Project: replacement of worn counter 
tops, kitchen and bathroom linoleum floors; continued 
maintenance of the heating system; interior painting of 
at least one third of the apartments. 
VETERANS' PROJECT 

The Commonwealth Contribution for the year was 
$8,650. 

Payment to the Town of Andover in lieu of taxes 
for the year 1964 was $1,876. 

There are 56 apartments in the project. The 
average monthly rental is $51.71, plus an average 
monthly utility charge of $18.68. 

The annual income limits for admittance for the 
coming year will be: for families with one or less minor 
dependent, $4,800; two minor dependents, $5,000; three 
or more minor dependents, $5,200. 



Income allowed for continued occupancy: for one 
or less minor dependent, $5,500; two minor dependents, 
$5,700; three or more minor dependents, $5,900. 

Shelter rent is based on total family income. Fam- 
ilies with one child, 18%; two children, 16%; three 
children, 14%; for each dependent child in excess of 
three, $200 is deducted from total family income. 

Ten new families have moved into the project and 
five families have moved within the project during the 
year. 
ELDERLY HOUSING PROJECT 

The Commonwealth Contribution for the year 
1964 was $12,625. 

There are 40 dwelling units, a recreation hall with 
lending library, and 2 laundry rooms in this project. 
The average monthly rental is $36.64 plus a monthly 
utility charge of $13.18. 

The yearly income limits for admission are: for 
one person, 65 years of age or older, $2,500; two per- 
sons, 65 years of age or older, $3,000. 

Four new tenants have moved into the project and 
one tenant moved within the project during the year. 

At present there are 26 applications for elderly 
housing on file. 
SECONDARY SCHOOL BUILDING COM. 

The building committee has been meeting weekly, 
sometimes bi-weekly, since the first of the year. 

The first order of business concerned the selection 



25 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

PROJECT 200-1 

BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1964 

ASSETS 



Cash - - Andover Savings Banks @ 4% 

Cash — Andover Savings Bank @ 4/2% 

Cash — Essex Savings Bank @ 4 I / 2 % 

Cash — Administration Fund 

Cash - Petty Cash 

Accounts Receivable — Tenants 

Accounts Receivable — State Aid 

Investments — U.S. Treasury Bonds @ 3%% 

Investments — U.S. Treasury Bonds @ 3-5/8% 

Debt Service Trust Fund 

Prepaid Insurance 

Development Cost 

Less Development Cost Liquidation 

Total Assets 



$ 



7,172.12 

30,662.52 

2,627.40 

8,863.25 

25.00 



626,000.00 
136,000.00 



$ 49,350.29 

720.90 

1,361.55 

15,000.00 

1,000.00 

352.06 

1,772.48 

490,000.00 

$559,557.28 



LIABILITIES, RESERVES & SURPLUS 



Liabilities 

Matured Interest and Principal 
Tenants' Security Deposits 
Prepaid Rents 
Bonds Authorized 

Less Bonds Retired 

Reserves 

Debt Service Reserve 
Unamortized Bond Premium 
Reduction of Annual Contribution 
Operating Reserves 

Surplus 

Total Liabilities, Reserves & Surplus 



> 12,350.80 

1,030.00 

664.25 

626,000.00 

136,000.00 

23,891.25 
1.352.06 
1,750.00 

18,922.10 



$ 14,045.05 
490,000.00 



45,915.41 

9,596.82 

$559,557.28 



of an architect. Some 27 firms were interviewed over 
a period of three months, with Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, 
and Dean of Boston being the final choice. 

The Annual Town Meeting in March was asked 
for and voted $12,000 to defray expenses of the commit- 
tee and to pay the architects for development of pre- 
liminary plans. 

The architects were asked to help determine the 
construction program which would be in the best inter- 
ests of the town. Our final decision was based on a 
thorough study of many reports, surveys, opinions, and 
observations. A 1200 pupil new high school, with most 
core facilities for 1800, to be built on the present site 
was deemed the best program for the town. It must be 
emphasized that this decision was made with the full 
realization that an addition must be scheduled for com- 
pletion by 1972. 

Several meetings have been held with the State 
School Building Assistance Commission and progress 
is steadily being made for approval of 40% financial 
aid from the state. 

A Special Town Meeting in October appropriated 
3,910,000 for this project but, also, voted to defer con- 
struction of an auditorium until the addition in 1972. 

Target date for completion of construction is 
September 1966 but, at this writing, various delays may 



be forcing a later date. You may rest assure that this 
committee is, and will continue, doing its utmost to 
ensure a project worthy of the town at the earliest pos- 
sible date. 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

During 1964, the Andover Development and In- 
dustrial Commission was able to announce the first 
tangible result of efforts to attract new industry. In 
June, it was made known that the Allied Chemical 
Corporation planned to construct a combination ware- 
house and office building in West Andover. Construc- 
tion is now planned to start in the spring of 1965. 

Recognizing that one of the Commission's prime 
concerns must be the welfare of Andover's existing in- 
dustries, the community relations sub-committee con- 
tacted local concerns during the year to offer our as- 
sistance in any situation wherein we might be helpful. 

From a promotional standpoint, letters were di- 
rected to key executives of a number of major corpora- 
tions throughout the country advising of the advan- 
tages to be gained through locating in Andover. While* 
no direct results were achieved, replies received were 
most gratifying. It is our opinion that continuation of 
this program, coupled with judicious follow-up, may 
eventually be productive. 



26 



During the year a number of specific leads other 
than Allied Chemical were pressed to conclusion 
through various means, including promotional letters 
and associated material, telephone calls and personal 
visitations. The Commission will continue to evaluate 
all prospects and assiduously follow up on those which 
appear appropriate. 

ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

SYSTEM 

BALANCE SHEET 

December 31, 1964 

ASSETS 

Cash: 

Bay State Merchants Nat'l Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 
Investments: 

Governments Bonds 
Railroad Bonds 
Telephone Bonds 
Public Utility Bonds 
Industrial Bonds 
Bank Stocks 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 



LIABILITIES 

Annuity Savings Fund 

Special Fund for Military Service 

Annuity Reserve Fund 

Pension Fund 

Expense Fund 



$ 2,104.06 
24,001.00 

10,000.00 

62,488.38 

141,590.05 

238,707.35 

61,639.24 

88,715.26 

6,432.25 

$635,677.59 

$457,151.45 

3,777.91 

113,649.38 

58,572.84 

2,526.01 



$635,677.59 
The required appropriation by the Town for 1965 
for the Pension Fund as certified by the Insurance De- 
partment of the Commonwealth is $93,528.00. 

During the year eight employees were taken into 
the system. Three members retired, five left the employ 
of the Town, one active member and three pensioners 
died. 

On December 31, 1964 there were two hundred 
twenty-nine active members, three inactive, forty on 
retirement and nine widows receiving survivorship 
allowance. 

ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY 
BOARD OF RETIREMENT REPORT 
Cash on Hand, January 1, 1964 23,073.32 

Receipts: 

Appropriations: 

Town Pension Fund 72,231.00 

Andover Housing Authority 518.00 

Expense Fund ' 2,811.00 

Members' Contributions 57,796.68 

Investment Income 23,982.53 

157,339.21 







180,412.43 


Expenditures: 






Annuities 


10,258.02 




Pensions 


88,080.38 




Investments 


49,018.75 




Accured Interest on 






Investments 


528.23 




Refunds 


3,478.98 





Office Maintenance: 
Salaries 

Accountant 400.00 

Clerk 2,261.00 

Safe Deposit 50.00 

Surety Bonds 52.00 

Dues, Meals & Travel 25.00 

Office Supplies 155.01 



Cash on Hand, December 31, 1964 

WOOD & COAL 

Ending December 31, 1964. 
Andover Savings Bank, Andover 

Book #13259 
Essex Savings Bank, Lawrence 

Book #82865 
Broadway Savings Bank, Lawrence 

Book #13405 
City Inst, for Savings, Lowell 

Book #69782 
Central Savings Bank, Lowell 

Book #21760 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand January 1, 1964 

Interest recorded during 1964 



EXPENDITURES 

October 24, 1964 Lawrence Gas Co. 
Balance on hand January 1, 1965 



154,307.37 
26,105.06 



$1,000.00 

$1,000.00 

$1,000.00 

$1,000.00 

$1,000.00 

$2,115.90 
207.50 

$2,323.40 

$ 62.00 
$2,261.40 



TOWLE FUND 

The Trustees under the will of Margaret G. Towle, 
Robert Henderson, George B. James and Mary L. 
Anderson, met for the first time September 21st, and 
elected Mr. Henderson as Chairman and Mrs. Ander- 
son as Secretary. Town Counsel, Mr. O'Brien, met with 
them outlining the legal statutes which govern the in- 
vestment of the Trust Fund. Arrangements were made 
with Miss Greeley, Town Treasurer, for administration 
of the investment policies made by the Trustees and for 
custodianship of the cash, certificates, bonds, and bank 
books owned by the Trust. 

During the first three metings of the Trustees a 
general investment policy was agreed upon which would 
have the objectives of ( 1 ) security of the funds in the 
Trust and (20) the greatest income consistent with the 
safety and the statuary limitations. It was noted that 
legal limit of disbursements for the Trust would be the 
interest earned. 

The sum of $250,000 was received by the Trust at 
its inception with the exception that an additional 
$100,000 would be forthcoming from the Internal 
Revenue Service when a tax rebate is approved. The 
funds received have been fully invested. 

At initial meetings of the committee, policies for 
disbursing the funds were determined after considering 
the provisions of the Will of Margaret G. Towle and 
the general needs of Andover. It was decided that the 
Trustees would discuss the nature of the Trust and the 
ways which it could be helpful with the town service 
agencies and the town's clergy and guidance directors. 
This program was started immediately. During the 
period the Trustees made disbursements of $448.62. 



27 



TOWN 
ACCOUNTANT 



BONDED DEBT 



$7.2 
Million 

III] "" MB 



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1964 

SCHEDULE A - Balance Sheet 

SCHEDULE B - Receipts 

SCHEDULE C - Expenditures 

SCHEDULE D - Analysis of Reserve Fund 

SCHEDULE E - Unpaid Taxes 

SCHEDULE F - Analysis of Revenue Account 

SCHEDULE G - Analysis of Surplus Revenue 

SCHEDULE H - Sewer Project. APW, Mass. 46G 



irni'i"' 

"Tpmrnnniii;: 
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-minMimnrr^ 



$4.8 
Million 



-rnimrnnnip i 
'imiimiiiiiTTT^ 
imnm 



$3.6 
Million 





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Tmnrnirrrn'ri 
iiniimiiiiiiii"! 

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klli ... iHUUIta 




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■ III III, :MlllillUI 




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nam 



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1964 1965 

Each Symbol = $100,000.00 



in IllUlllilll 



' "TWTTmmw 
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TTHIIHTK III-TP^ 

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$2.5 

Million 




1975 



$1.2 
Million 




1980 



$0 



1984 



28 



SCHEDULE A 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
BALANCE SHEET -- DECEMBER 31, 1964 
GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



ASSETS 



Cash: 

General 

Sewer Project 
Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes: 

1959 Real Estate 210.60 

1960 Personal 148.20 
Real Estate 424.45 

1961 Personal 122.20 
Real Estate 769.60 

1962 Personal 85.80 
Real Estate 1,938.50 

1963 Personal 3,268.30 
Real Estate 6,244.48 

1964 Personal 2,895.67 
Real Estate 

116,788.43 



Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise: 

1957 184.01 

1958 172.80 

1959 5,751.91 

1960 6,531.19 

1961 5,844.60 

1962 5,197.57 

1963 11,861.79 

1964 57,482.44 

Farm Animal Excise 63.88 

Special Assessments: 
Sewer : 
Added to Taxes of: 

1963 55.51 

1964 123.33 

Water : 
Added to Taxes of : 

1963 91.82 

1964 439.26 

Committed Interest: 
Levy of 1963 76.17 
Levy of 1964 254.75 

Tax Titles & Possessions: 
Tax Titles 12,379.60 
Tax Possessions 11,990.53 

Departmental : 

Fire Ambulance 546.00 

Sewer 836.75 

Highway 126.00 



11,323,871.97 
87,307.68 







LIABILITIES 








and 








RESERVES 




Employees Payro 


11 


Deductions: $ 




Federal Taxes 




27,550.68 




State Taxes 




3,463.52 




Purchase of 








Savings Bonds 




1,851.35 




Blue Cross & 








Blue Shield 




328.46 




Group Life 








Insurance 




33.10 




United Fund 




5.00 


33,232.11 


Guarantee Deposit 


s : 




Highway 




3,513.00 


3,513.00 



132,896.23 



93,026.31 



Agency: 
Chapter 782 - 1962 9,557.72 
Chapter 822 - 1963 13,869.01 
Cemetery Perpetual 

Care Funds 544.00 

Machinery Account 406.10 



Tailings: 
Unclaimed Checks, etc. 543.67 

Trust Fund Income: 
Walter Landor Raymond Welfare 



24,376.83 

543.67 
4.26 







Federal Grants: 






63 


88 


Disability Assistance: 








Administration 


949.57 








Assistance 


1,016.32 








Aid to Dependent 










Children : 










Administration 


1,824.89 








Aid 


1,790.71 








Old Age Assistance: 










Administration 


2,595.96 








Assistance 


3,497.45 








Medical Assistance 






1,040 


84 


for Aged: 

Administration 

Assistance 


1,434.17 
2,624.68 




1,040 


84 


Education: 
National Defense 

Education Act, 

Title V 
Aid to Cuban 


137.81 




4,370 


13 


Refugees 


478.50 


16,350.06 






State Aid to Libraries 


4,283.50 



29 



School 2,389.56 

State Grants: 
Aid to Dependent 
Children : 

Assistance 2,968.31 
Disability 

Assistance : 
Medical Assistance 
for Aged: 
Assistance 6,866.62 



Revolving Funds: 
School Lunch 25,853.97 

Andover Athletic Association 11,955.58 

Appropriation Balances 437, 

Sewer Project, APW Mass. 46G 70, 

Loans Authorized & Unissued 4,070, 

Sale of Real Estate Fund 6, 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 6, 
Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 
Parking Meters 8,195.96 



179.96 
893.71 
000.00 
364.15 
194.00 



Water : 












Oil-Street Parking 








Rates 


53,450 


84 








Meters 979.87 








Services 


6,349 


.13 










9 


175 


.83 


Liens Added to 












Old Age Assistance Recovery 




20 


.00 


Taxes : 












Overlay Surplus 


43 


525 


.49 


1959 


337 


09 








Overlays Reserved for 








1960 


123 


23 








Abatements : 








1962 


39 


.58 








1959 210.60 








1963 


235 


.41 








1960 572.65 








1964 


1,042 


46 


61. 


577 


.74 


1961 891.80 

1962 - See Underestimates. 








Aid to Highways : 












1963 9,512.78 








State 


11,716 


51 








1964 - See Underestimates. 








County 


5,858 


26 










11 


187 


.83 








17. 


574 


.77 


State Parks & Reservations 


1 


138 


.38 



Loans Authorized: 
Sanborn School 15,000.00 
Rogers Brook, 

Art. 48, 1960 20,000.00 
Rogers Brook, 

Art. 8, 1964 125,000.00 
Sr. High School, 

Art. 8, 1964 3,910,000.00 



Unprovided For or Over- 
drawn Accounts: 
Underestimates : 
Overlay, 1962 67.60 
Overlay, 1964 8,570.63 
County Tax 2,357.27 



4,070,000.00 



Interest on Invested Funds: 
Sewer Project, APW Mass. 46G 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected 
Motor Vehicle & 

Trailer Excise 93,026.31 
Farm Animal Excise 63.88 
Special Assessmentsl , 040. 84 
Tax Title & 

Possession 24,370.13 
Departmental 6,866.62 
Water 61,577.74 

Aid to Highways 17,574.77 



16,413.97 



Surplus Revenue 



204,520.29 
832,909.16 



Trust Fund 
Transactions 



44.08 



11,039.58 



$5,829,635.75 

DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



$5,829,635.75 



Apportioned Assessments 
Not Due: 
Sewer 
Water 

Suspended Assessments : 
Sewer 



48,732.96 
17,378.62 



3,728.04 



Apportioned Sewer Assessment 
Revenue Due in 1965 to 1982 
Inclusive $ 

Apportioned Water Assessment 
Revenue Due in 1965 to 1982 
Inclusive 

Suspended Sewer Assessment 
Revenue 



$ 69,839.62 



48,732.96 

17,378.62 

3,728.04 
$ 69,839.62 



30 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded & Fixed Debt $3, 620, 000. 00 



Article 1, 1951, $ 

Elementary School 100,000.00 

Article 10, 1955, High School 1,100,000.00 
Article 1, 1957, South School 520,000.00 
Article 24, 1961, 

Sanborn School 685,000.00 

Article 1, 1957, Ballardvale 

& Abbott Wells 120,000.00 

Article 14, 1960, Sewer 

Trunk Line 165,000.00 

Article 48, 1960 Rogers Brook 120,000.00 
Article 1, 1963, Sewer Project, 

APW, 46G 



$3,620,000.00 
TRUST AND INVESTMENT FUNDS 



810,000.00 



$3,620,000.00 



Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash & Securities: 
In Custody of Treasurer $ 

In Custody of Trustees 



In Custody of Treasurer: 
Welfare Funds: 
608,445.46 Emily F. Raymond 

Walter Landor Raymond 
203,938.16 David & Lucy Hayward Shaw 
Edward Taylor Fuel 
Village Improvement Funds: 
Emeline S. Lincoln 
Emma J. Lincoln 
School Funds : 
Dr. Edward C. Conroy 
Draper 
Holt 
Alfred V. Lincoln 

Spelling Bee 
Varnum Lincoln 

Spelling Bee 
Rafton Science Prize 
Warren Richardson 
U. S. Constitution - 
Andover Post #48, 
American Legion 
Library Funds: 

Kate Adams Swift Memorial 
Park Fund: 

Andover Tennis Court 
Cemetery Funds : 
Isaac E. Giddings 

Burial Ground 
Abbie M. Smart, Special 
Special Flower Funds 
Perpetual Care 
Investment Fund: 

Post-War Rehabilitation 
Stabilization Fund 
Towle Fund 



1,500.00 

9,129.87 

10,451.87 

200.99 

1,773.75 
965.81 

308.06 

1,493.88 

110.67 

636.42 

636.43 

907.07 

1,555.35 



212.74 
271.36 
934.23 



1,638.06 

1,515.43 

4,557.22 

186,911.47 

29,136.82 
104,208.46 
249,389.50 



608,445.46 



31 



[n Custody of Trustees: 

John Cornell Wood & 

Coal Fund 7,261.40 

Punchard Free School Funds : 

Principal 80,054.06 

Barnard 1,035.59 

Henry W. & Mabel Barnard 1,062.12 

Alice M. Bell 1,023.60 

Edna G. Chapin 2,318.75 

Draper 1,498.13 

Goldsmith 355.54 
Elizabeth T. Gutterson 

Scholarship 1,023.90 
M. E. Gutterson 

Botany Prize 339.85 

Reserve 10,966.83 

Memorial Hall Library Fund 96,998.39 



203,938.16 



$ 813,012.95 



$ 813,012.95 



MUNICIPAL CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 



Municipal Retirement Fund 
Cash & Securities $ 

Accrued Interest on 
Bonds 



Annuity Savings Fund 
629,245.34 Special Fund for Military 
Service 
Annuity Reserve Fund 
6,432.25 Pension Fund 
Expense Fund 



$ 457,151.45 

3,777.91 

113,649.38 

58,572.84 

2,526.01 



$ 635,677.59 



$ 635,677.59 



Richardson 
Draper 
Holt 
Conroy 

American Legion 
V. & A. V. Lincoln 
Emma J. Lincoln 
Swift 
Taylor 

David & Lucy Shaw 
Giddings 
Smart 

W. L. Raymond 
E. F. Raymond 
Flower Fund (18) 
Rafton 

Andover Youth 
Tennis Fund 
Towle Fund 



Beneficiary 

Shawsheen School 
School Dept. 
School Dept. 
Punchard Prizes 
Punchard Prizes 
Spelling Prize 
A.V.I.S. 
A.V.I.S. 
Library 



South Cemetery 

South Cemetery 

Welfare 

Welfare & Cemetery 

Cemetery 

Science Prizes 

Tennis Courts 
Aged, Disabled, 
Unemployed 



TRUST FUNDS in custody of Treasurer 

Balance 



Principal 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

50.00 

250.00 

200.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

544.60 

300.00 

100.00 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

> ,000.00 

7,845.81 

1,500.00 

3,260.00 

598.50 

736.63 



Deposits 



$ 1,494.89 

1,435.90 

106.39 

303.96 

209.40 

1,223.45 

1,704.91 

928.33 

260.84 

193.19 

11,007.19 

1,574.48 

1,472.29 

9,745.87 

1,500.00 

4,569.70 

852.87 

897.99 



Inc 

.Ian. 



1, 1964 



30. 



f For a beneficiary 
For accrued interest 



$ 448.62 
655.53 



240,000.00 
$271,385.54 $39,481.65 



240,000. 
$240,030. 



60.46 $ 

57.98 
4.28 

12.10 8.00 

8.34 5.00 

49.40 

68.84 

37.48 

10.52 
7.80 
444.68 1,000.00 

63.58 

59.14 16.00 

384.00 1,000.00 

60.00 60.00 

180.52 193.00 

54.20 

36.24 

10,482.65 1,093.15* 
$12,082.21 $3,375.15 



Balance 
Dec. 31, 1964 
$ 1,555.35 

1,493.88 

110.67 

308.06 

212.74 

1,272.85 

1,773.75 

965.81 

271.36 

200.99 

10,451.87 

1,638.06 

1,515.43 

9,159.87 

1,500.00 

4,557.22 

907.07 

934.23 

249,389.50 
$288,218.71 






$1093.15 



32 



SCHEDULE B 
TOWN OF ANDOVER 

RECEIPTS 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1964 

GENERAL REVENUE 



Taxes 

Current Year 

Real Estate $ 3,063,069.69 

Personal Property 151,224.23 
Previous Years 

Real Estate 101,030.17 

Personal Property 2,868.85 

Poll 274.00 

Tax Title Redemptions 1,604.51 

Andover Housing Authority 1, 876.00 

3,321,947.45 

Licenses 

Liquor 8,815.00 

Other 4,052.25 

12,867.25 

Fines 

Court 1,673.80 

FEDERAL, STATE AND COUNTY AID 

Federal 

Old Age Assistance 42,028.88 

Disability Assistnace 9,053.19 

Medical Assistance for Aged 38,074.91 

Aid to Dependent Children 18,598.59 

School Lunch Program 51,363.45 

National Defense Education Act 3,928.07 

Aid to Cuban Refugees 393.80 

State 

Old Age Assistance 18,231.10 

Disability Assistance 7,926.14 

Medical Assistance for Aged 25,423.86 

Aid to Dependent Children 7,409.26 

General Relief 132.07 

Chapter 90 Construction 22,109.97 

School Aid - Chapters 69, 70 and 71 185,568.14 

School Tuition and Transportation 45,548.00 

School Building Assistance 56,010.73 

Library 4,283.50 

Health Department 114.00 

Vocational Education 3,086.82 

Aid to Highways - Chapter 822 of 1963 34,224.90 

Snow Removal 1,271.00 

Veterans Benefits 12,259.56 

Corporation Tax 231,644.25 

Income Tax 90,870.99 

Meal Tax 5,491.82 

Reimbursement - Loss of Taxes 3,242.03 

County 

Chapter 90 Construction 11,054.98 

Dog Licenses 2, 348 . 17 

931,692.18 



33 



COMMERCIAL REVENUE 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

Current Year 

Previous Years 
Farm Animal Excise 
Parking Meters 
Off-street Parking Meters 
Commission on Public Telephones 
Boat Plates 



434,919.24 

106,185.18 

414.84 

6,386.22 

897.74 

16.00 

64.50 

548,883.72 



DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 



General Government 

Rent of Town Property 
Gravel Pit Fees 
Board of Appeals 
Tax Collector 

Certificate Fees 
Discharges 
Town Clerk's Fees 
Sale of Street Lists 
Town Scales 
Protection of Persons and Property 
Ambulance Fees 
Bicycle Registrations 
Sale of Firearms and Equipment 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Building Inspector Fees 
Plumbing Inspector Fees 
Wire Inspector Fees 
Oil Burner Permits 
Health Department Permits 
Sale of Dogs 
Highways 

Supervision of Tree Trimming 
Schools 

School Cafeterias 
Andover Athletic Association 
Summer School Tuition 
Miscellaneous Tuition 
Rentals and Other 
Public Welfare 

Old Age Assistance - Cities and Towns 
Veterans Services 

Reimbursement - Individuals 
Photostatic Copies 
Library 

Fines and Sales 
Cemetery 

Care of Lots 

Foundations 

Sale of Lots 

Tombs and Interments 

Perpetual Cares 

Miscellaneous 



2,400.00 

1,865.00 

320.00 

1,247.00 

30.00 

420.30 

325.50 

108.25 

935.00 

118.50 

25.00 

148.45 

9,393.50 

1,916.50 

1,346.00 

1,370.00 
27.00 

1, 161.00 

136,534.22 

10, 155.74 

6,850.00 

1,090.97 

1,684.91 

1,251.77 

279.75 
16.75 

4,635.44 

232.00 

514.73 

56.00 

3,412.00 

5,814.00 

48.00 

195,733.28 



34 






PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 

Water Rates 206,096.15 

Water Services 12,489.12 

Water Services Added to Taxes 665.54 

Water Liens Added to Taxes 9,312.65 

Water Betterments 8,031.19 

Water Betterments Added to Taxes 1,467.81 

Sewer Assessments 6,742.79 

Sewer Assessments Added to Taxes 5,749.17 

Sewer Installations 139.70 

250,694.12 



INTEREST 

Committed Interest 3,141.46 

Treasury Bills 21,019.05 

Certificates of Deposit 440.28 

Savings Accounts 3,427.29 

Taxes 4,163.57 

Motor Vehicle Excise 1,524.57 

Water and Sewer Assessments 123.30 

Flower Funds 193.00 

Walter L. Raymond Fund 1,0 25.00 

Spring Grove Cemetery Funds 6,131.05 

Trust and Investments 2,662.97 

"3TTS51.54 

MUNICIPAL DEBT 

Tax Revenue Anticipation Loans 1,000,000.00 



AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



Employees' Deductions 

Federal Withholding Taxes 342,262.93 

State Withholding Taxes 39,798.21 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 34,676.77 

Savings Bonds 25,858.09 

Group Insurance 4,410.08 

United Fund 1,111.30 

Memorial Hall Library Funds 

Contribution to Budget Supplement 4,100.00 

Town Clerk's Dog Licenses Due County 3,182.25 

455,399.63 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Dog Funds - Care and Custody 195.00 

Recreation 60.00 
Employer's Compensation for 

Collecting State Income Tax 251.09 

Deposits in Escrow 2,500.00 

Tailings - Unclaimed checks 58.02 

Unidentified Cash 2.63 

3,066.74 



35 



REFUNDS, REIMBURSEMENTS AND RECOVERIES 



Refunds - Departmental 

Reimbursements - Departmental 

Reimbursements - Public Welfare 

Old Age Assistance Recoveries 

Reimbursements - Aid to Dependent Children 

Petty Cash Refunds 

Miscellaneous 



18, 076.28 

517.80 

721.07 

11,496.44 

1, 651.20 

965.00 

5,414.83 

38,842.62 



Accelerated Sewer Project 



Cash on Hand, January 1, 1964 



$ 6,804, 652.33 
662,452.94 

7,467, 105.27 
1,882,298.13 

$ 9,349,403.40 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 

January 1, 1965 



Real Estate and Property: 
Valuation 1962 
Valuation 1963 
Valuation 1964 

Motor Vehicles: 

Valuation 1962 

Valuation 1963 

Valuation 1964 
Net Valuation for 3 years less abatements 
Average valuation for 3 years less abatements 

Borrowing Capacity 5% 

Town Debt December 31, 1964 
Less Debt Outside Debt Limit: 

Sanborn School Loan 

High School Loan 

South School Loan 

Water Loan 

Sewer Project Loan 
*Town Debt Inside Debt Limit 
Borrowing Capacity January 1, 1965 
Less Commitment for Unused Portions of Rogers 

Brook Drainage and Sanborn School 
Uncommitted Borrowing Capacity January 1, 1965 

*Town Debt Inside Debt Limit: 
Elementary School Loan 
High School Loan 
Sewer Loan-Riverina 
Rogers Brook 

Voted in 1964 but not yet borrowed, $3,910,000 for a new High School. 



$ 92,498,395. 

96,778,050. 

100,861,483. 

6,419,466. 

6,608,128. 

7,292,798. 

$310,458,320. 

103,486,107. 

5,174,305. 



$685,000. 
990,000. 
520,000. 
120,000. 
810,000. 



$100,000. 

110,000. 

165,000. 

120,000. 
$495,000. 



$3,620,000. 



3,125,000. 



495,000. 
4,679,305. 

160,000. 
4,519,305. 



36 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
EXPENDITURES 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1964 



SCHEDULE C 



Moderator 

Salary 
Selectmen 

Salaries 

Of f iceSalaries 

Expenses 
Town Manager 

Salary 

Office Salary 

Expenses 
Town Counsel 

Retainer Fee 

Special Cases 
Town Accountant 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Treasurer 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Tax Collector 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Assessors 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Town Clerk 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Elections & Registrations 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Municipal Buildings 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Planning Board 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Board of Appeals 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Police Department 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Equipment 
Fire Department 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Equipment 
Building Inspector 

Salaries 

Expenses 



Balance Appropri- 
1/1/64 ations & 
Transfers 


Expendi- 
tures 


Transfers 

to 

Revenue 


Balance 
Reserved 
for 1965 


125.00 


100.00 


25.00A 




2,100.00 
600.00 
775.00 


2,100.00 
600.00 
771.36 


3.64A 




12,750.00 
4,893.00 
4,273.70 


11,785.27 
4,794.72 
3,925.74 


964.73 
98.28 
347. 96A 




3,000.00 
3,000.00 


3,000.00 
2,952.89 


47.11 




15,564.00 
1,115.00 


15,564.00 
991.84 


123.16 




13,637.00 
1,879.00 


13,631.25 
1,330.61 


5.75 
548.39 




15,541.00 
2,000.00 


15,316.51 
1,782.49 


224. 49 A 
217.51 




20,761.00 
6,870.00 


20,191.19 
4,859.01 


569.81 
2,010.99E 




11,222.00 
1,000.00 


11,205.00 
864.74 


17.00 
135.26 




11,614.00 
5,600.00 


11,608.73 
5,582.22 


5.27A 
17.78 




7,491.00 
7,910.00 


7,475.82 
7,112.45 


15.18A 
797.55 




4,369.00 
8,490.00 


4 , 273 . 29 
8,096.73 


95.71 
393.27 




891.00 
550.00 


701.15 
380.09 


189.85 
169.91 




196,002.00 

19,650.00 

7,578.08 


193,233.69 

19,304.94 

7,416.46 


2,768.31 
345. 06A 
161.62 




263,587.00 
22,035.00 
15,000.00 


256,875.74 

21,176.18 

4,067.05 


6,711.26 

858.82 

10,932.95 




9,883.00 
1,525.00 


9,828.98 
1,361.00 


54.02 
164.00 





37 



Bal 


ance Appropri- 


Expendi- 


Transfers 


Balance 


1/1/64 ations & 


tures 


to 


Reserved 




Transfers 




Revenue 


for 1965 


Wire Inspector 










Salaries 


3,207.00 


3,207.00 






Expenses 


600.00 


565.82 


34.18 




Sealer of Weights 










and Measures 










Salaries 


1,300.00 


1,300.00 






Expenses 


525.00 


514.96 


10.04 




Civil Defense 










Salaries 


900.00 


750.00 


150.00 




Expenses 


2,600.00 


1,171.90 


1,428.10 




Tree Department 










Salaries 


15,203.00 


14,971.01 


231.99 




Expenses 


2,310.00 


2,079.85 


230.15 




Insect Pest Control 










Salaries 


7,381.00 


7,373.32 


7.68 




Expenses 


2,825.00 


2,450.86 


374.14 




Dutch Elm Department 










Salaries 


11,022.00 


10,775.53 


246.47 




Expenses 


2,425.00 


2,261.63 


163.37 




Dog Officer 










Salary 


600.00 


600.00 






Expenses 


400.00 


330.00 


70.00 




Health Department 










Salaries 


13,825.00 


13,527.87 


297.13 




Expenses 1,100.00 12,244.00 


9,555.28 


3,788.72 




Animal Inspector 










Salary 


600.00 


600.00 






Public Dump 










Salaries 


7,612.00 


7,540.63 


71.37 




Expenses 


7,480.00 


4,421.23 


3,058.77 




Garbage Collection 










Expenses 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 






B.P.W. 










Administration & Ofc. 










Salaries 


35,289.00 


34,600.38 


688.62 




Expenses 


3,290.00 


2,977.71 


312.29 




Engineering 










Salaries 


12,085.00 


8,168.79 


3,916.21 




Expenses 


3 ,456.00 


906.63 


549.37 




Highway 










Salaries 


80,741.00 


80,637.43 


103.57 




Expenses 


55,050.00 


49,920.15 


5,129.85 




Equipment 


25,000.00 


23,573.50 


1,426.50 




Street Lighting 








1 


Expense 


37,918.00 


37,348.85 


569.15 


Snow Removal & Sanding 










Salaries 


25,233.00 


25,068.51 


164.49 




Expenses 


41,175.00 


41,150.33 


24.67A 


' 


Equipment 


7,100.00 


5,002.06 


47.94 


2,050.00 


Sidewalk Construction 










Salaries 


6,776.00 


5,343.89 


1,432.11 




Expenses 


4,717.00 


3,072.90 


1,644.10 




Highway Improvements 










Salaries 


1,759.00 


640.53 


1,118.47 




Expenses 


5,500.00 


3,560.50 


1,939.50 




Sewer 










Salaries 


13,767.00 


12,089.02 


1,677.98 




Expenses 


9,300.00 


7,945.23 


1,354.77 




Water 










Salaries 


77,881.00 


77,642.71 


238.29 




Expenses 6,212.86 75,550.00 


79,025.74 


2,737.12 





38 



Balance 


Appropri- 


Expendi- 


Transfers 


Balance 


1/1/64 


ations & 


tures 


to 


Reserved 




Transfers 




Revenue 


for 1965 


Truck & Garage Maint. 










Salaries 


12,577.00 


12,328.01 


248.99 




Expenses 


43,540.00 


43,260.31 


279. 69 A 




Equipment 


300.00 


300.00 






Welfare 










Salaries 


7,094.00 


7,094.00 






Welfare Payments 


110,459.00 


110,457.91 


1.09A 




Veterans' Services 










Salaries 


9,804.00 


9,750.06 


53.94 




Expenses 


2,480.00 


1,898.65 


581.35 




Veterans' Benefits 


28,000.00 


27,999.78 


.22 




School Department 










Salaries 1,708,035.00 1 


,690,733.87 


17,301.13 




Expenses 320.34 


403,275.00 


388,851.90 


13,923.10 


820.34 


Memorial Hall & Elementary 










School Libraries 










Salaries 


85,900.00 


83,660.67 


2,239.33 




Expenses 


30,296.17 


29,970.29 


325.88 




Parks 










Salaries 


13,578.00 


13,525.29 


52.71 




Expenses 


2,300.00 


2,167.63 


132.37 




Equipment 


2,500.00 


1,921.00 


579.00 




Recreation 










Salaries 


30,136.00 


29,299.60 


836.40 




Expenses 


10,462.00 


10,280.65 


181.35 




Patriotic Holidays 










Expenses 


1,872.00 


1,661.91 


210.09 




Retirement System 










Salaries 


2,486.00 


2,486.00 






Expenses 


325.00 


325.00 






Pension Payments 


69,531.00 


69,531.00 






Group Life & Medical 










Insurance 


18,000.00 


15,789.33 


2,210.67 




Spring Grove Cemetery 










Salaries 


24,228.05 


22,554.83 


1,673.22 




Expenses 


3,400.00 


2,770.38 


629.62 




Bonded Debt Payments 


345,000.00 


345,000.00 






Interest on Bonded Debt 


106,845.00 


94,020.00 


12,825.00 




Interest - Temporary Loans 


10,400.00 


10,365.40 


34.60A 




Bond Issue Expense 


2,000.00 




2,000.00 




Greater Lawrence Regional 










Vocational High School 


2,828.00 


2,827.50 


.50 




Committee to Study Town 










By-Laws 


8,500.00 


7,354.97 


1,145.03 




Town Reports 


2,341.00 


2,315.08 


25.92A 




Veterans' Quarters 


2,880.00 


2,160.00 


720.00 




Insurance 


45,902.00 


42,563.22 


3,338.78 




Damage to Persons & 










Property 


600.00 




600.00 




Postage Meter 


3,100.00 


2,950.13 


149.87 




Industrial Development 










Commission 


2,000.00 


91.35 


1,108.65 


800.00 


Personnel Review Board 


850.00 


38.66 


811.34 





SPECIAL ARTICLES 

Art. 8 - 1958 

Acquire Future School 
Sites, etc. 19,100.00 

Art. 15 - 1958 

Industrial Development 

Commission 550.00 



19,100.00D 



550.00 



39 



Art. 16 - 1960 

Pipe for Crossing 

Route 495 
Art. 26 - 1960 

Land Acquisition 
Art. 44 - 1960 

Land at Haggetts Pond 

for Increasing Water 

Storage 
Art. 48 - 1960 

Storm Drainage Rogers 

Brook 
Art. 5 - 1961 

Improvements to 

Water System 
Art. 6 - 1961 

Engineering Superv. 

Route 495 
Art. 14 - 1961 

Establish Boundaries 
Art. 16 - 1961 

Land Purchase by 

Conservation Committee 
Art. 17 - 1961 

Land Acquisition 

Committee 
Art. 24 - 1961 

Sanborn School 
Art. 25 - 1961 

Sewer, Love joy Rd. 
Art. 60 - 1961 

Civil War Centennial 

Committee 
Art. 16 - 1962 

Garbage Collection 
Art. 17 - 1962 

Improvements to 

Water System 
Art. 18 - 1962 

Preliminary Plans for 

New Town House, Fire 

& Police Stations 
Art. 21 - 1962 

Land Acquisition 
Art. 22 - 1962 

Rogers Brook 
Art. 24 - 1962 

Establish Boundaries 
Art. 25 - 1962 

Sub Drainage at 

High School 
Art. 26 - 1962 

Easements at Crossing 

Gates, B&M RR 
Art. 27 - 1962 

Library Extension 

Plans 
Art. 49 - 1962 

Chap. 90, Highway 

Construction 



Balance 
1/1/64 



7,951.71 
1,828.95 

8,829.20 

29 , 223 . 69 

883.54 

4,975.63 
656.30 

1,500.00 

30,000.00 
6,035.05 
3,421.59 

467.00 
2,141.38 

2,199.26 

435.21 

17,017.62 

8,371.20 

1,897.75 

748.87 

25.00 

1,448.70 

7,325.03 



Appropri- 
ations & 
Transfers 



Expendi- 
tures 



Transfers 

to 

Revenue 



Balance 
Reserved 
for 1965 



252.00 



4,544.98 3,406.73 

1,828.95D 



577.00 
1,433.54 



705.92 
656.30 



3,917.60 



687.08 

299.74 
1,000.00 



1,351.25 
6,188.15 



30,000.00D 



2,199.26C 



435. 21C 



8,252.20 

27,790.15 

883.54 

4,269.71 

1,500.00 

2,117.45 
3,421.59 

467.00 
2,141.38 



16,330.54 
8,371.20 
1,598.01 

.87 

25.00 

97.45 

1,136.88 



40 



Art. 8 - 1963 

Water Drainage 

Improvements 
Art. 9 - 1963 

Chap. 90, Highway 

Construction 
Art. 10 - 1963 

Establish Boundaries 
Art. 11 - 1963 

Sidewalk Construction 

Love joy Road 
Art. 12 - 1963 

Improvements to 

Water System 
Art. 13 - 1963 

Land for Pumping Sta. 

Mouth of Fish Brook 
Art. 27 - 1963 

Land Acquisition 
Art. 32 - 1963 

Water Main in 

Cross Street 
Art. 1 - 1964 

Refund on Tax Sale 
Art. 2 - 1964 

School Dept . Prior 

Year's Salary 
Art. 3 - 1964 

Appraisal Fee, 

Wildwood Road 
Art. 7 - 1964 

Chap. 90, Highway 

Construction 
Art. 8 - 1964 

Rogers Brook 

Construction 
Art. 9 - 1964 

Re-classification Survey 
Art. 10 - 1964 

Establish Boundaries 
Art. 13 - 1964 

Improvements to Water 

System 
Art. 14 - 1964 

Water Drainage 

Improvements 
Art. 15 - 1964 

Pension Increases 
Art. 18 - 1964 

Police Station, Former 

Shaw Property 
Art. 20 - 1964 

Plans for Secondary 

School Facilities 
Art. 21, 22, 23 - 1964 

Land Acquisition 
Art. 24 - 1964 

Recreational Facilities 
Art. 31 - 1964 

Stabilization Fund 



Balance 
1/1/64 



8,439.43 



Appropri- 
ations & 
Transfers 



Expendi- 
tures 



Transfers 

to 

Revenue 



54 



25 



19 



,000.00 
,000.00 

,528.90 

,054.89 

,000.00 
,000.00 



3,338.89 



507.97 

192.70 

250.00 

54,000.00 

25,000.00 
3,500.00 
2,000.00 

79,900.00 

23,840.00 
2,700.00 

75,000.00 

12,000.00 
94,928.95 
10,000.00 
50,000.00 



1,705.94 4,539.82C 



38,592.66 



10,183.50 9,000.00C 



732.12 

1,012.84 
507.97 

192.70 

250.00 



301.37 

30,613.37 

12,594.26 
2,700.00 

5,034.00 

11,676.80 

5,394.46 
50,000.00 



19,000.000 



Balance 
Reserved 
for 1965 



2,193.67 

15,407.34 
2,000.00 

6,528.90 

5,871.39 

2,267.88 

2,326.05 



54,000.00 

25,000.00 
3,198.63 
2,000.00 

49,286.63 

11,245.74 

69,966.00 

323.20 

94,928.95 

4,605.54 



41 



Balance Appropri- Expendi- Transfers Balance 
1/1/64 ations & tures to Reserved 
Transfers Revenue for 1965 

SUB-TOTALS 286,027.99 4,928,822.62 4,563,090.82 214,579.83 437,179.96 

AGENCY, REVOLVING & 

MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS: 

Parking Meters Reserve 5,750.00 5,746.18 3.82B 

2,620.00 2,277.90 342. 10B 

School Cafeterias 25,052.14 187,897.67 187,095.84 25,853.97 

Andover Athletic 
Assoc. 11,287.29 10,155.74 9,487.45 11,955.58 

Aid to Dependent 

Children: 
Aid 106.90 17,000.75 15,316.94 1,790.71 

Administration 1,233.41 3,610.09 3,018.61 1,824.89 

Disability Assistance- 
Assistance 59.68 8,172.00 7,215.36 1,016.32 
Administration 750.14 881.19 681.76 949.57 

Medical Assistance to 

Aged: 
Assistance 36,389.35 33,764.67 2,624.68 

Administration 776.58 1,693.56 1,035.97 1,434.17 

Old Age Assistance: 
Assistance 2,781.40 44,258.75 43,542.70 3,497.45 

Administration 1,465.19 2,922.99 1,792.22 2,595.96 

Aid to Cuban 

Refugees: 590.00 111.50 478.50 



Commonwealth of Mass. 17,644.67 

Interest - Trust Funds 117.16 

Interest - Cemetery Perpetual Cares 1,597.89 

Cemetery Flower Funds 185.00 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 34,692.03 

Dog Licenses 3,182.25 

Sale of Dogs 27.00 

Essex County Tax 111,682.49 

Essex County T.B. Hospital 15,640.34 

Group Life Insurance 4,419.02 

Interest - Sewer Project 16,413.97 

National Defense Education Act 732.26 

Old Age Assistance Recoveries 1,271.35 

Petty Cash Advances 965.00 

Walter Raymond Fund 1,049.32 

Release of Bonds 6,000.00 

Savings Bonds 25,706.25 
Spring Grove Cemetery: 

Perpetual Care Funds 5,270.00 

Temporary Loans - Anticipation of Revenue 1,000,000.00 

United Fund 1,106.30 

Withholding Taxes - Federal 342,212.22 

Withholding Taxes - State 45,886.83 
Accelerated SewerProject : 

APW - Mass - 46G 

Art. 1 - August 14, 1963 1,370,198.71 



42 



329,540.72 5,250,764.71 4,874,177.92 214,925.75 491,201.76 






Expendi- 
tures 

State Aid to Highways - Chap. 782 

Art. 6 - 1963 4,794.25 

State Aid to Highways - Chap. 822 

Art. 6 - 1964 20,355.89 

Departmental Revenues 83.15 

Other Refunds 32,786.77 

Miscellaneous 25.71 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES FOR 1964 $7,938,223.75 

Cash on Hand, January 1, 1965: General 1,323,871.97 

Sewer Project 87,307.68 



$9,349,403.40 



A - Transferred to Reserve Fund 

B - Transferred to Parking Meter Reserve 

C - Transferred to Surplus Revenue by vote 

of Town Meeting, March 7, 1964 
D - Transferred to Arts. 21, 22, & 23, 

1964 
E - $250.00 to Reserve Funds - 

Balance to Revenue 



43 



SCHEDULE D 



SCHEDULE E 



ANALYSIS OF RESERVE 
FUND 



UNPAID TAXES 
DECEMBER 31, 1964 



Vote of Town Meeting, 
March 7, 1964, Article 33 



Transfers 



$ 



Interest, 

Temporary Loans 
Town Reports 
High School Bldg. 

Committee 
Tax Collector, 

Salaries 
Article 25, 1962 
Selectmen, Expenses 
Moderator, Salary 
Public Welfare, 

Benefits 10, 
Town Manager, 

Expenses 
Trucks & Garage, 

Expenses 4. 

Municipal Bldgs., 

Salaries 
Elections & Regis- 
trations, Salaries 
Police, Expenses 2. 
Police, Equipment 2. 
Assessors, Expenses 
Elections & Regis- 
trations, Salaries 
Public Welfare, 

Benefits 4, 

Snow Removal & 

Sanding, Salaries 3, 
Municipal Bldgs., 

Salaries 
Public Welfare, 

Benefits 



400.00 

116.00 

500.00 

996.00 

252.00 

200.00 

50.00 

000.00 

873.70 

465.00 

531.00 

490.00 
500.00 
328.08 
250.00 

430.00 

800.00 

000.00 

200.00 

120.00 



$ 35,000.00 



Refund of Unexpended Transfers 1,582.57 

Balance Transferred to 
Overlay Surplus 4, 080.79 



ersonal 


Property 


and Real 


Estate: 


Persona 


1: 


1960 


$ 148.20 


1961 


122.20 


1962 


85.80 


1963 


3,268.30 


1964 


2,895.67 


Real: 




1959 


210.60 


1960 


424.45 


1961 


769.60 


1962 


1,938.50 


1963 


6,244.48 


1964 


116,788.43 



Farm Animal & Motor 
Vehicle & Trailer 
Excise: 

Farm Animal: 63.88 
1962 $ 63.88 

Motor Vehicle 

& Trailer Excise: 

1957 184.01 

1958 172.80 

1959 5,751.91 

1960 6,531.19 

1961 5,844.60 

1962 5,197.57 

1963 11,861.79 

1964 57,482.44 



$132,896.23 






$ 93,090.19 
$225,986.42 



$36,582.57 $36,582.57 



44 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
ANALYSIS OF REVENUE ACCOUNT 



schedule 
SCHEDULE F 



Appropriations 
State Parks & 

Reservations 
State Audit of 

Municipal Accounts 
State Examination of 

Retirement System 
Motor Vehicle Excise 

Tax Bills 
County Tax 

Essex County T.B. Hospital 
Overlay, 1964 
Underestimates : 

State Parks & Reservations 

Overlay, 1962 
Tax Titles Taken 
Balance to Surplus Revenue 



$4,434,222.00 

13,824.63 

3,285.17 

85.80 

1, 587.45 

109,325.22 

15,640.34 

36,399.02 

1,276.34 

1,324.45 

1,570.80 

499,755.12 

$5, 118,296.34 



Tax Levy: 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Over-Estimate - County Tax 
Estimated Receipts 
Unexpended Appropriations 

December 31, 1964 
Receipts in Excess of 

Estimated Receipts 



155,535.60 

3,217,863.00 

2,311.62 

1,243,840.80 

126,894.02 

371,851.30 



i5, 118,296.34 



ANALYSIS OF SURPLUS REVENUE 



SCHEDULE G 



Audit Adjustments $ 5.60 

Tax Titles Taken 4,977.25 

Emergency Repairs to 

School Heating System 8,700.00 

Transfer to Aid of Cuban 

Refugees 196.20 

Transfer by Vote of Town 
Meeting, June 15,1964 to: 
Police Department, Salaries 6,000.00 
Transfer by Vote of Town 
Meeting, March 7, 1964: 
Article 7, Chapter 90, 

Highway Construction 54,000.00 

Article 8, Rogers Brook 25,000.00 
Article 10, To Establish 

Boundaries 2,000.00 

Article 13, Improvements 

to Water System 79,900.00 

Article 14, Water Drainage 

Improvements 23,840.00 

Article 15, Pension Increases 

for Certain Pensioners 2,700.00 
Article 18, Police Station, 

Shaw Property 75,000.00 

Article 20, Plans for 

Secondary School Facilities 12,000.00 
Articles 21, 22 & 23, 

Land Acquisition 25,000.00 

Article 24, Recreation 

Facilities 10,000.00 

Article 31, Stabilization 

Fund 50,000.00 

Special Articles, 
October 19, 1964 4,450.67 

Balance, December 31, 1964 832,909.16 



Balance, January 1, 1964 
Audit Adjustments 



694,387.10 
553,87 



Accounts Payable Refund 33.95 

Poll Tax Adjustment 2.00 

Premium on Bond Issue 5,772.55 

Unexpended Appropriations 
Transferred by Vote of 
Town Meeting, March 7, 1964: 
Article 17, 1962, Improvements 

to Water System 2,199.26 

Article 8, 1963, Water 

Drainage Improvements 4,539.82 

Article 18, 1962, Preliminary 
Plans for Town House, Fire 
& Police Stations 435.21 

Article 12, 1963, Improvements 
m to Water System 9,000.00 



Revenue Account Transfer 



499,755.12 



$1,216,678.88 



$1,216, 678.88 



45 



SCHEDULE H 



SEWER PROJECT, APW MASS. - 46G 



RECEIPTS: 

Bond Issue 

Transfer from Surplus Revenue 

Bond Premium 

Federal Grants 



209,875.00 
419,750.00 



Interest on Invested Funds 
Interest Transferred from General 
Treasury to Interest Reserve Account 



$ 855,000.00 

25,000.00 

6,156.00 



629,625.00 
16,413.97 

16,413.97 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Contractors : 
Contract 1A 
Contract 2 
Contract 3 
Contract 4 



15,599.79 
290,946.34 
337,466.52 
557,773.94 



Architect & Engineering Services 

Legal & Administrative 

Interest on Bond Issue 

Project Contingency 

Interest Earned on Invested Funds 

Transferred to General Treasury 
Bond Premium Transferred to Premium Account 
Miscellaneous 



$1,548,608.94 



1,237,786.59 

170,949.58 

1,007.00 

12,825.00 

4,519.80 

16,413.97 

6,156.00 

11,643.32 



RECEIPTS 
DISBURSEMENTS 



$1,461,301.26 

$1,548,608.94 

1,461,301.26 



BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 1964 



$ 87,307.68 



46 



TOWN 

MEETING 

MINUTES 



HOW ONE BECOMES A VOTER. 



Who can vote? 

A citizen of the United States, 
2 1 years of age or more on election day, 
who can read and write English, 

and has been a resident of Massachusetts for one 
year immediately preceding the date of the election, 
and a resident of his city or town for six months im- 
mediately before the date of election, 
and is a registered voter in his city or town. 

New Residents Law of 1962. 

A citizen who fulfills all the other basic voting quali- 
fications listed here may vote by special ballot for 
president and vice-president only, provided he has 
lived in Massachusetts for a minimum of 32 days 
before the election. 

Who must register? 

A citizen who has not registered before, 
or has moved to a new city or town, 
changed his name through court action or marriage, 
or whose name was not included in the annual listing 
of residents on the January first previous to the elec- 
tion. 

Otherwise, voters need register only once in Massa- 
chusetts. 



How to register. 

Appear before the local board of registrars of voters 
and prove under oath that you have the necessary 
qualifications for voting. 

Registration by mail 

is not provided for by law except for servicemen and 
all other federal employees, or spouse, parent or child 
of a federal employee on foreign service who meet the 
requirements listed on page five for absentee voting. 
If you are unable to appear in person because of ill- 
ness you may apply in writing to your local registrar 
who will send two registration officers to your resi- 
dence. 

Where to register. 

At the city or town hall or a designated place in a 
city ward. 

In factories, mills, hospitals or rest homes upon peti- 
tion by ten voters. City or town clerks or local boards 
of registrars will supply more information. 

When to register. 

On any business day of the year except on the 20 

days before city, town or special state primaries or 

elections, 

and on the 32 days before presidential primaries, 

biennial state primaries and elections. 



47 



MARCH 2, 1964 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, January 22, 1964, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover , qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and 
assembled at the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five 
and Six, viz: The Central Fire Station in Precinct One; the Square and Compass Hall 
in Precinct Two; the Sacred Heart School, Balmoral Street, Shawsheen Village, in 
Precinct Three; the Andover Grange Hall in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, Ballard- 
vale, in Precinct Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in Precinct Six, in 
said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 1964 

at 7:00 o'clock A. M., to act upon the following articles: 



Essex, SS . 



March 2, 1964 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
places and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 



ELECTION OF OFFICERS 



ARTICLE 1 



Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at seven o'clock A. M, 
and closed at seven o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 5,431, in- 
cluding the absentee votes from the central counting, — viz: 



Precinct 1 - 1231 
Precinct 4 - 1022 



Precinct 2 - 830 
Precinct 5 - 426 



Precinct 3 - 830 
Precinct 6 - 1092 



PRECINCTS 



MODERATOR - FOR ONE YEAR 



1023 641 694 889 353 981 
208 189 136 133 73 111 



Charles G. Hatch 
Blanks 



4581 
850 



SELECTMEN - TWO FOR THREE YEARS 



802 


429 


545 


690 


274 


854 


617 


576 


407 


476 


239 


380 


654 


308 


487 


588 


190 


737 



389 347 221 290 149 213 



Philip K. Allen 
Michael E. Brennan 
Robert A. Watters 
Blanks 



3594 
2695 
2964 
1609 



48 







PRECINCTS 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


832 


540 


525 


566 


262 


600 


346 


219 


252 


402 


142 


434 


53 


71 


53 


54 


22 


58 



731 


550 


503 


574 


273 


537 


623 


389 


387 


520 


231 


586 


772 


407 


548 


677 


217 


775 


336 


314 


222 


273 


131 


286 



SELECTMEN - ONE FOR ONE YEAR 
(to fill a vacancy) 

Roger W. Collins 3325 

J. Paul Herbert 1795 

Blanks 311 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

William A. Doherty 3168 

Lee E. Noyes 2736 

Robert E. Sherman 3396 

Blanks 1562 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL - FIVE 
FOR THREE YEARS 

985 637 670 820 344 932 Arthur W. Cole 4388 

4484 
4262 
4289 
4274 
5458 



4618 
813 



989 


634 


697 


869 


347 


948 


Fred W. Doyle 


954 


593 


654 


809 


327 


925 


Edmond E . Hammond 


961 


599 


659 


811 


328 


931 


C. Carleton Kimball 


968 


598 


653 


807 


325 


923 


Harry Sellars 


1298 


1089 


817 


994 


459 


801 


Blanks 
ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY - 




676 


705 


867 


357 


943 


ONE FOR FIVE YEARS 


1070 


Thomas R. Wallace 


161 


154 


125 


155 


69 


149 


Blanks 



GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
COMMITTEE - ONE FOR THREE YEARS 



008 


626 


713 


881 


353 


944 


Fred S . Tarbox 




223 


204 


117 


141 


73 


148 


Blanks 

QUESTION NO. 


1 


584 


449 


314 


396 


210 


455 


YES 




579 


287 


476 


555 


195 


574 


NO 




68 


94 


40 


71 


21 


63 


BLANKS 

QUESTION NO. 


2 


563 


431 


291 


352 


195 


438 


YES 




578 


291 


474 


584 


207 


587 


NO 




90 


108 


65 


86 


24 


67 


BLANKS 

QUESTION NO. 


3 


388 


348 


245 


317 


138 


348 


YES 




804 


419 


563 


675 


283 


724 


NO 




39 


63 


22 


30 


5 


20 


BLANKS 





4525 
906 



2408 

2666 

357 



2270 

2721 

440 



1784 

3468 

179 



All the foregoing officers and questions were voted for on one ballot and the check 
lists were used. 



49 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 1 



Andover , March 2, 1964 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Harold R. Barcroft. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 1228. Number of ballots received 2000. Number of ballots returned 
772. Number of ballots cast 1228 plus 3 absentee votes — total votes 1231. Police 
officer on duty, Hector G. Pattullo Jr. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 

Frederick E. Griffin, Clerk 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 2 



Andover, March 2, 1964 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Fernand J. Lussier .Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 828. Number of ballots received 1400. Number of ballots returned 
572. Number of ballots cast 828 plus 2 absentee votes — total 830. Police officer 
on duty, William J. Stewart. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 3 



James V. Gerraughty, Jr., Clerk 
Andover, March 2, 1964 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, A. Norman Warhurst. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 830 (box jumped one). Number of ballots received 1700. Number of 
ballots returned 870. Number of ballots cast 829 plus 1 absentee vote—total 830. 
Police officers on duty, Henry Giaimo and James Lynch. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 4 



Philip A. Winters, Clerk 
Andover, March 2, 1964 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, James D. Doherty. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 1021. Number of ballots received 2000. Number of ballots returned 
979. Number of ballots cast 1021, plus 1 absentee vote — total vote 1022. Police 
officer on duty, Warren A. Maddox. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 5 



Russell C. MacLeish, Clerk 
Andover , March 2, 1964 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Eugene A. Zalla. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered when 
polls closed 426. Number of ballots received 800. Number of ballots returned 374. 
Number of ballots cast 426. Police officer on duty, Richard Aumais . Counted ballots 
at 7:02 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 6 



Charles T. Bentley, Clerk 
Andover, March 2, 1964 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Charles E. Piatt. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 1080. Number of ballots received 2000. Number of ballots returned 
920. Number of ballots cast 1080 plus 12 absentee votes — total 1092. Police officer 
on duty, Robert V. Deyermond. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 



Edward A. Doyle, Clerk 



After final action of Article One 



the said meeting was adjourned by virtue of 
Section 20, Chapter 39, of the General Laws to Saturday, March 7, 1964, at 9:30 
o'clock A. M. at the Memorial Auditorium. 



50 



MARCH 7, 1964 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 355 voters admitted to the 
meeting . 

The meeting was called to order by Charles G. Hatch, Moderator, at 9:45 A. M. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. Wendell E. Minnigh, Jr. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman William Stewart. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit fifty-seven non-voters to the meeting, and 
one wished to address the meeting. 

The Moderator announced that no smoking or eating would be allowed in the Audito- 
rium. 

Voted to dispense with the reading of the warrant and service of the Constable. 

Voted that the Moderator refer to articles by number and subject matter without 
the Moderator reading the article and the person moving an article refer to it by 
number . 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, one 
Selectman for one year (to fill a vacancy), two members of the School Committee for 
three years, five Trustees of Punchard Free School for three years, one member of 
the Andover Housing Authority for five years, one member of the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District Committee for three years, and 
any other Town officers required by law to be elected by ballot, also to vote on the 
following questions: 

QUESTION NO. 1 "Shall the Town extend contributory group hospital, surgical, medi- 
cal insurance to elderly persons retired from the service of the town and to their 
dependents with fifty percent of the premium cost and a portion of the administra- 
tive expense to be paid by the town?" 

QUESTION NO. 2 "Shall the Town pay one half the premium costs payable by a re- 
tired employee for group life insurance and for group general or blanket hospital, 
surgical and medical insurance?" 

QUESTION NO. 3 "Shall the Town vote to accept the provisions of section one hun- 
dred and eight G of chapter forty-one of the General Laws whereby, if accepted, the 
minimum annual compensation of each regular police officer of the police department 
of the town of Andover shall not be less than the following: For the first year of 
service fifty-five hundred dollars, for the second year of service six thousand dol- 
lars and for the third and each succeeding year of service sixty-three hundred dol 
lars?" 

All the above candidates and questions to be voted for on one ballot. The polls 
will be open from 7:00 o'clock A. M. to 7:00 o'clock P. M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of election and questions of March 2, 1964. 
The Moderator declared Charles G. Hatch elected as Moderator and the Town Clerk de- 
clared that he had previously been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties 
of that office. 

The Moderator then declared the other successful candidates elected to their re- 
spective offices and the Town Clerk declared that they had been sworn to the faithful 



51 



performance of the duties of their offices. 

Philip K. Allen, Selectman for Three Years 

Robert A. Watters, Selectman for Three Years 

Roger W. Collins, Selectman for One Year (to fill a vacancy) 

William A. Doherty, School Committee for Three Years 

Robert E. Sherman, School Committee for Three Years 

Arthur W. Cole, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Fred W. Doyle, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Edmond E. Hammond, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

C. Carleton Kimball, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Harry Sellars, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Thomas R. Wallace, Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

Fred S. Tarbox, Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District Committee for Three Years 

Question No. 1— YES 2408, NO 2666 

Question No. 2— YES 2270, NO 2721 

Question No. 3— YES 1784, NO 3468 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by bal- 
lot"! 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED Frederick E. Cheever be elected Trustee of 
Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salary of elected TOWN OFFICERS for the ensuing year, 
(to be taken together with Article 4) . 

ARTICLE 4. To determine what sums of money shall be appropriated for the 1964 
Town Budget as submitted by the Town Manager and reviewed by the Finance Committee in 
their report. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and appropriate the following sums 
of money : 

Moderator Salary $ 75.00 

Selectmen Salaries 2,100.00 

Office Salaries 600.00 

Expenses 575.00 

Town Manager Salary 12,750.00 

Office Salary 4,893.00 

Expenses (Incl. $500 out-of- 3,400.00 
state travel) 

Town Counsel Retainer Fee 3,000.00 

Special Cases 3,000.00 

Town Accountant Salaries 15,564.00 

Expenses 1,115.00 



52 



Treasurer 



Tax Collector 



Assessors 



Town Clerk 



Elections and Registrations 



Municipal Buildings 



Planning Board 



Board of Appeals 



Police Department 



Fire Department 



Building Inspector 



Wiring Inspector 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



Civil Defense 



Tree Department 



Insect Pest Control 



Dutch Elm Department 



Dog Officer 



Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 

Expenses (Incl. $150 out-of- 
state travel) 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries* 

Expenses (Incl. $150 out-of- 
state travel) 

Equipment 

♦Includes 1 additional 
patrolman 

Salaries 

Expenses (Incl. $150 out-of- 
state travel) 

Equipment* 
♦Chief's car-$2,500 
Forest Fire Equipment-$12, 500 

Salaries 

Expenses (Incl. $150 out-of- 
state travel) 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salary 
Expenses 



13,637.00 
1,879.00 

14,545.00 
2,000.00 

20,761.00 
6,620.00 



11,222.00 
1,000.00 

10,694.00 
5,600.00 

6,760.00 
7,910.00 

4,369.00 
8,490.00 

891.00 
550.00 

190,002.00 
17,150.00 

5,250.00 



263,587.00 
22,035.00 

15,000.00 



9,883.00 
1,525.00 



3,207.00 
600.00 

1,300.00 
525.00 

900.00 
2,600.00 

15,203.00 
2,310.00 

7,381.00 
2,825.00 

11,022.00 
2,425.00 

600.00 
400.00 



53 



Health Department 

Animal Inspector 
Public Dump 

Garbage Collection 
DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Administration and Office 

Engineering 

Highway 



Snow Removal and Sanding 



Sidewalk Construction 



Highway Improvements 



Sewer 



Water 



Truck and Garage Maintenance 



Welfare 



Veterans Services 



School Department 



Salaries 
Expenses 

Salary 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Expenses 



Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Street Lighting 
Equipment* 
*Highway Grader 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Equipment* 
*Sidewalk Plow $4,700 
Salt & Sand Spreader $2,400 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Salaries 
Expenses 



Salaries 
Expenses (Incl 
state travel) 



$100 out-of- 



Salaries 

Expenses* ( Incl . $150 out-of- 
state travel) 
*Painting Wood Hill Tank $8,000 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Equipment 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Welfare Payments ($95,539 less 
$1,000 interest on Trust Funds) 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Veterans' Benefits 

Salaries 

Expenses (Incl. $1500 out-of- 
state travel) 



$ 13,825.00 
12,244.00 

600.00 

7,612.00 
7,480.00 

25,000.00 



35,289.00 
3,290.00 

12,085.00 
1,456.00 

80,741.00 
55,050.00 
37,918.00 
25,000.00 



24,233.00 

39,175.00 

7,100.00 



6,776.00 
4,717.00 

1,759.00 
5,500.00 

13,767.00 
9,300.00 



77,881.00 
75,550.00 



12,577.00 

39,075.00 

300.00 

6,064.00 

1,030.00 

94,539.00 



9,804.00 

2,480.00 

28,000.00 

1,708,035.00 
394,075.00 



54 



Memorial Hall and Elementary 
School Libraries 



Parks 



Salaries 

Expenses ($29,457 less $5,609 

investment income and dog 

licenses) 

(Incl. $400 out-of-state travel) 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Equipment* 
*3/4 ton pick-up truck 



$ 85,900.00 
23,848.00 



Salaries 
Expenses 



Recreation Department 

Patriotic Holidays Expenses 

Board of Retirement 



Salaries 
Expenses 
Pension Payments 



Salaries 

($23,597 less interest on 

perpetual care funds $5,500) 

Expenses 



Group Life and Medical Insurance 
Spring Grove Cemetery 

Bonded Debt Payments 

Interest on Bonded Debt 

Interest-Temporary Loan 

Bond Issue Expense 

Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical High School 

Committee to Study Town By-Laws 

Town Reports 

Veterans' Quarters 

Insurance 

Damage to Persons and Property 

Postage Meter 

Industrial Development Commission 

Personnel Review Board 

TOTAL BUDGET TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION 

: SPECIAL ARTICLES (All to be taken from available funds except 
Article 8, part of which is to be bonds or notes) 

ARTICLE 7 Chapter 90 Highway Construction 

ARTICLE 8 Rogers Brook reconstruction plus $125,000 to 
be bonds or notes 

ARTICLE 10 Establish Boundaries 



13 


578 


00 


2 


300 


00 


2 


500 


00 


30 


136 


00 


10 


462 


00 


1 


872 


00 


2 


486 


00 




325 


00 


69 


531 


00 


18 


000 


00 


18 


097 


00 


3 


400 


00 


345 


000 


00 


106 


845 


00 


10 


000 


00 


2 


000 


00 


2 


828 


00 


8 


500 


00 


2 


225 


00 


2 


880 


00 


45 


902 


00 




600 


00 


3 


100 


00 


2 


000 


00 




850 


00 


$4,434 


222 


00 



$ 54,000.00 
25,000.00 

2,000.00 



55 



ARTICLE 13 Improvements to Water System $ 79,900.00 

ARTICLE 14 Water Drainage Improvements 23,840.00 

ARTICLE 15 Pension increase for persons retired before 2,700.00 

January 1, 1963 

ARTICLE 18 Police Station, former Shaw Property 75,000.00 

ARTICLE 20 Plans for secondary school facilities 12,000.00 

ARTICLES 21, 22 and 23 

Land Acquisition 25,000.00 

(transfer funds remaining under Art. 8, 1948 — 
Art. 26 — 1960, Art. 17, 1961— Art. 27, 1963) 

ARTICLE 24 Recreational Facilities 10,000.00 

ARTICLE 31 Stabilization Fund 50,000.00 

TOTAL SPECIAL ARTICLES TO BE TRANSFERRED FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS $ 359,440.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLE (Bonds or Notes of the Town) 

ARTICLE 8 Rogers Brook 125,000.00 

TOTAL SPECIAL ARTICLES $ 484,440.00 

Total BUDGET to be raised by taxation 4,434,222.00 

GRAND TOTAL BUDGET AND SPECIAL ARTICLES $4,918,662.00 

ARTICLE 33 VOTED to transfer $35,000 from Overlay Reserve to the 
Reserve Fund 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Town Manager and the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time 
after January 1, 1965, in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year begin- 
ning January 1, 1965, in accordance with Section 4, Chapter 44, General Laws, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor payable within one year, and to renew any not so is- 
sued for a period of less than one year, in accordance with Section 17 of said Chap- 
ter 44 . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 5 as printed. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
funds to be made available by the Commonwealth in the amount of $34,024.90 for road- 
way improvements under the provisions of Chapter 822 of the Acts of 1963. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to appropriate under Article 6, the sum of 
$34,024.90 for roadway improvements, from proceeds to be received by the town from 
the Commonwealth under Chapter 822 of the Acts of 1963. 

The regular town meeting was recessed and the Special Town Meeting was opened at 
this time. See Page 55 for action taken on this Special Meeting. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $54,000.00 for Chapter 90 Highway Construc- 
tion, the town to be reimbursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County, and 
to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, by pur- 
chase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer from available 
funds under Article 7 the sum of $54,000.00 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, the 
Town to be reimbursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County, and to author- 



56 



ize the Town to acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by 
seizure by right of eminent domain. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $150,000.00 or any other 
sum for the purpose of reconstructing Rogers Brook and its tributaries, and the 
sewers, other utilities, and surface drainage in connection therewith, to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or otherwise 
and to provide for the easements therefor, with the understanding that the area in- 
volved is from the West side of Main Street to the headwall on the East side of 
Whittier Street. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to appropriate the sum of 
$150,000.00 under Article 8 for the construction of sewers for surface drainage 
purposes in connection with Rogers Brook and its tributaries from the west side of 
Main Street to the headwall on the east side of Whittier Street; that the sum ap- 
propriated, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is to be paid to the State 
Treasurer pursuant to Chapter 91 of the General Laws as amended; that to meet the 
foregoing appropriation the sum of $25,000.00 is to be transferred from available 
funds and the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to issue 
$125,000. bonds or notes of the town under G. L. Chap. 44 s.7(l); with the under- 
standing that no funds will be used unless matching state funds at least to the ex- 
tent of $150,000. are determined by the Selectmen to be available under Chapter 91 
of the General Laws. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will assume liability in the manner provided by 
Section 29 of Chapter 91 of the General Laws, as most recently amended by Chapter 5, 
Acts of 1955, for all damages that may be incurred by work to be performed by the 
Department of Public Works of Massachusetts for the improvement, development, main- 
tenance and protection of tidal and non-tidal rivers and streams, harbors, tide- 
waters, foreshores and shores along a public beach, including the Merrimack and 
Connecticut Rivers in accordance with Section 11 of Chapter 91 of the General Laws, 
and authorize the Selectmen to execute and deliver a bond of indemnity therefor to 
the Commonwealth, all in connection with work on Rogers Brook. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 9 as printed. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from 
available funds the sum of $2,000.00 to establish boundaries and lay out the lines 
of existing ways used publicly but not accepted as public ways by Town Meeting ac- 
tion. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 10 as printed. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell the 
property known as Bradley School and the land on which it lies for such sum as they 
deem best for the Town and to authorize the Selectmen to sign, seal with the Town 
seal and execute a deed or deeds of the said property. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 11 as printed. The VOTE 
YES 363, NO 2, voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell 
property known as the Richardson School and the land on which it lies for such sum 
as they deem best for the Town and to authorize the Selectmen to sign, seal with 
the Town seal and execute a deed or deeds of the said property. 

Article 12 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $94,900.00 for improvements to the water 
system and authorize the following construction: 

1. Chlorinating facilities at Bancroft and Prospect Hill $40,000.00 

Reservoirs 



57 



2. Water mains not less than six inches and not more than 
sixteen inches in size in the following locations. 

Bellevue Road 8" C. L.C.I. 1700 ft. 

$15,300.00 

Haggetts Pond Road 8" C. L.C.I. 900 ft. 

$ 8,000.00 

Old County Road and 8" C. L.C.I. 800 ft. 

Rattlesnake Hill Road $ 7,500.00 

Salem Street from Vine 12" C. L.C.I. 750 ft. 

Street to existing 12" $ 9,000.00 

3. A culvert and necessary road construction on Haggetts $15,000.00 
Pond Road and a culvert on Wood Hill Road 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds under 
Article 13, the sum of $79,900.00 for improvements to the water system and authorize 
the following construction: 

1. Chlorinating facilities at Bancroft and Prospect Hill $40,000.00 
Reservoirs 

2. Water mains not less than six inches and not more than 
sixteen inches in size in the following locations. 

Bellevue Road 8" C. L.C.I. 1700 ft. 

$15,300.00 

Haggetts Pond Road 8" C. L.C.I. 900 ft. 

$ 8,100.00 

Old County Road and 8" C. L.C.I. 800 ft. 

Rattlesnake Hill Road $ 7,500.00 

Salem Street from 12" C. L.C.I. 750 ft. 

Vine Street to existing 12" $ 9,000.00 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $128,210.00 for surface water drainage im- 
provements and authorize the construction hereinafter described, and to authorize 
the Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain. 

North Street $62,000.00 

Porter Road 21,000.00 

Hidden Road 300.00 

Beacon Street 3,370.00 

Osgood Street 2,540.00 

Holt Road 32,520.00 

Highland Road 6,480.00 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer from available 
funds under Article 14 the sum of $23,840.00 for surface water drainage improvements 
and authorize the construction hereinafter described, and to authorize the Town to 
acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain. 

Porter Road $21,000.00 

Hidden Road 300.00 

Osgood Street 2,540.00 






58 






ARTI CLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 478 
of the Acts of 1963 providing for increase of pensions of persons retired before 
January 1, 1963, and to raise by taxation or appropriate from available funds the 
sum of $3,300.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 478 of the Acts of 1963 providing for increase of pensions of persons re- 
tired before January 1, 1963, and to transfer from available funds under Article 
15, the sum of $2,700 for the remainder of this year. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to continue for the further period of 
one (1) year the Committee to study and revise the Town By-Laws and Zoning By-Laws, 
appointed by the Selectmen for that purpose under Article 17 of the Town Warrant 
passed at the 1957 Town Meeting, such committee to report at the next annual town 
meeting or at any Special Town Meeting which may be held in the interim. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 16 as printed. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Ban- 
croft Road in accordance with plans on file at the office of the Town Clerk and as 
laid out by the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize the Town to acquire the neces- 
sary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, over 
the parcels of land shown on said plan. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 17 as 
printed . 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or appropriate from 
available funds the sum of $75,000.00 or any other sum to alter, reconstruct, or 
equip the town-owned building known as the former Shaw property off Main Street to 
be used as a Police Station. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds under 
Article 18, the sum of $75,000.00 to alter, reconstruct, or equip the town-owned 
building known as the former Shaw property off Main Street to be used as a Police 
Station and no construction to be done and no plans to be adopted until the plans 
for the exterior of the building and for the development and treatment of the 
grounds about the building have been examined by the Planning Board and the board 
has made recommendations thereon, also that plans and construction to conform with 
the town charter. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to file, in behalf of the inhabitants of the Town, an application in form 
and manner required by the United States Government, and in conformity with P. L. 
560, 83rd Congress as amended by P. L. 345, 84th Congress and do whatever else may 
be required to obtain an advance to be made by the United States to the Town of 
Andover to aid in defraying the cost of final plans and specifications for the con- 
struction of a raw water transmission main and a pumping station with the necessary 
appurtenances . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 19 as printed. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$12,000.00 to be used to defray the cost of retaining an architect to draft plans 
for new high school facilities, the money to be expended by the School Building 
Committee . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds under 
Article 20, the sum of $12,000.00 to be used to defray the cost of retaining an 
architect to draft plans for necessary secondary school facilities, the money to be 
expended by the School Building Committee. 

VOTED to act on Articles 21, 22 and 23 together. 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation $25,000.00 or any 



59 



other sum for the purpose of acquiring by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain all or any of the following: 

1. Land and any buildings thereon for school sites designated by the 
School Committee as follows: 

(a) Land on South Main Street supposed to be owned by Elizabeth D. 
Barnard, Winifred M. Barnard and others. 

(b) Land on Osgood Street and supposed to be owned by John M. and 
Elizabeth W. Forbes. 

2. Land and any buildings thereon for increasing the town dump site and 
the sanitary land fill area facilities as follows: 

(a) Land near Chandler Road and supposed to be owned by Robert A. and 
Catherine T. Park, and Harold E. and Ruth L. McGrath. 

3. Land at the corner of Greenwood Road and High Plain Road supposed to be 
owned by John F. and Frederick A. Higgins for a proposed fire station. 

and to authorize the Land Acquisition Committee to negotiate for the securing of 
options, making deposits on purchases and obtaining easements, said committee to 
advise as to any parcel of land to be ac quired, but the final decision on land and 
price to be made by the Selectmen, funds to be expended and eminent domain to be 
exercised only by the Selectmen. 

See Vote under Article 23. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds appropriated under Article 21 of the Annual Town War- 
rant of March 10, 1963, the sum of $24,000.00 for the purchase as a school site, of 
land, consisting of 23.5 acres more or less, off Suncrest Road, and described as 
parcel number 11 of assessors' map number 62, and known as the land of Cottage Farm 
of Andover, Inc.; this land adjacent to the DeVries land on the north, the Town of 
Andover school site on the east and the D'Annolfo land on the south; and to obtain 
by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain this said land and 
such rights of way from proposed Archer Lane and Frederick Street and Route 125 By- 
Pass as the Board of Selectmen may deem to be necessary, and the right of seizure 
by eminent domain to be exercised only by the Board of Selectmen, on petition of 
Andover Taxpayers' Association. 

See Vote under Article 23. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, 
or transfer from available funds appropriated under Article 21 of the Annual Town 
Warrant of March 10, 1962, the sum of $25,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing, for 
sanitary land fill operations or refuse disposal, land adjacent to the present town 
dump site, consisting of 50 acres more or less and described as parcels 3, 4, 5, 6 
and 7 on Assessors' map number 147, or any portion thereof which the above sum will 
purchase, with the exception of a parcel bounded as follows: commencing at the 
point where the westerly boundary of parcel number 5 intersects Chandler Road, run- 
ning southwesterly along this boundary a distance of 500 feet, thence southeasterly 
to a point 500 feet from Chandler Road on a line at 90 degrees to Chandler Road and 
running in a southerly direction from a point on Chandler Road 600 feet in an east- 
erly direction from the point of beginning, thence along this line to Chandler Road 
and thence along Chandler Road to the point of beginning. The Selectmen being 
directed to acquire this land by gift, purchase, or by the right of seizure by 
eminent domain, on petition of Andover Taxpayers' Association. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that acting under Articles 21, 22 and 23, 
the town transfer from available funds $25,000.00 and transfer the funds remaining 
from funds voted under Article 8 of the Town Meeting Warrant of 1958, Article 26 of 
1960, Article 17 of 1961 and Article 27 of 1963 to acquire any or any part of or 
all of the following land for municipal purposes and land and any buildings thereon 



60 






in Items 1, 2, and 3 for school sites. 

1. Land on South Main St. supposed to be owned by Elizabeth D. Barnard, 
the heirs of Winifred M. Barnard and others. 

2. Land on Osgood Street supposed to be owned by John M. and Elizabeth W. 
Forbes . 

3. Land off Suncrest Road being parcel 11 on Assessors' Map 62 supposed 
to be owned by Cottage Farms, Inc. together with easements over land 
supposed to be owned by Cottage Farms, Inc., by Winchester Development 
Corp. and by D'Annolfo Bros., Inc. 

5. Land shown on Assessors' Map 147 as lots 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, near 
Chandler Road supposed to be owned by Park and by Sherman Walden Shaw. 

6. Land at the corner of Greenwood and High Plain Roads supposed to be 
owned by John F. and Frederick A. Higgins . 

7. Any other land. 

The power to designate which land will be acquired to lie with the Board of Select- 
men after consultation with the Board of Health and subject to approval of the 
Planning Board; and to authorize the Land Acquisition Committee to negotiate for 
the gift or purchase of the parcels subject to approval of the price by the Board 
of Selectmen; and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire all or any part of or any 
of the so-called Barnard, Cottage Farms, Forbes, Park, lots 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 on 
plan 147, and Higgins parcels and the easements adjacent to Cottage Farms by right 
of eminent domain if, in the opinion of such Board, such seizure is advisable or 
necessary. The VOTE YES 398, NO 41. Voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $10,000.00 for the purpose of developing 
and improving recreational facilities on the site of the recently acquired property 
formerly known as Camp Olympia and Manning property, on petition of the Recreation 
Committee . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds under 
Article 24, the sum of $10,000.00. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $3,700.00 and reimburse Wyncrest Develop- 
ment Corporation this amount, being the difference in cost of an 8" water main in- 
stalled in Dascomb Road from Osgood Street in a southwesterly direction for a dis- 
tance of 700 feet, more or less, on petition of John Fulton and others. 

Article 25 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $9,000.00 for constructing 600 feet more 
or less of 12" water main in Dascomb Road from the present termination of the water 
line at the intersection of Dascomb Road and Carriage Hill Road in a southwesterly 
direction along said Dascomb Road to the intersection of Dascomb Road and proposed 
Surrey Lane as required by the Master Plan for water distribution in Andover, said 
main to be installed under the betterment act, on petition of John Fulton and 
others . 

Article 26 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will appropriate $500.00 towards the cost and 
operation of Andover ' s Christmas Lighting Program (costing approximately $2,50 0.00 
per year) the balance of which will be borne by the Andover Board of Trade, Divi- 
sion of the Greater Lawrence Chamber of Commerce, as provided in Chapter 40, Section 
5, Sub Section 46 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusett , on peti- 
tion of the Andover Board of Trade and others . 



61 



Article 27 was not moved. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to increase Compensation Grades PF-2, 
PF-3 and PF-4 of the Police and Fire Annual Salary Schedule by twelve and one half 
percent (12^), on petition of Henry L. Hilton and others. 

Article 28 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to memorialize the Town Manager to in- 
crease the annual salary schedule by (11%) eleven percent for all town employees 
with the exceptions of the Police and Fire Departments and School Department, on 
petition of the Town Employees 1 Association. 

Article 29 was defeated. The VOTE-YES 179, NO 312. 

ARTICLE 30. A vote to see if the Town will accept revisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 108F, establishing a minimum salary of $5,500.00 per year and a 
maximum salary of $6,300.00 per year for each firefighter permanently employed in 
the Fire Department in the Town of Andover, on petition of Town Employees' Associa- 
tion. 

Article 30 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate by taxation or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $50,000.00 to be added to the Stabiliza- 
tion Fund which was established by the Town in 1963 under Section 5B of Chapter 40 
of the General Laws . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds under 
Article 31, $50,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization Fund. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use 
$150,000.00 free cash to reduce the 1964 tax rate and to offset appropriations for 
capital outlay voted at the 1964 Town Meeting. 

Article 32 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $50,000.00 from Overlay 
Reserve to the Reserve Fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer the sum of $35,000.00 from 
Overlay Reserve to the Reserve Fund. 

ARTICLE 34. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the following unexpended appropria- 
tions be transferred to surplus revenue: 

ITEM NO. 



1 Article 17, 1962 Water Improvements-Pine St.-Lovejoy Rd . $ 2,199.26 

2 Article 8, 1963 Storm Drainage-Gleason St. 4,539.82 

3 Article 18, 1962 Preliminary Plans for new municipal buildings 435.21 

4 Article 12, 1963 Water improvements-South Main St. and 9,000.00 

Prospect Road 

$16,174.29 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will adopt as a by-law for the Town the following: 

"Owners of land whereon is located an abandoned well or a well in use shall either 
provide a covering for such well capable of sustaining a weight of three hundred 



62 



pounds or shall fill the same to the level of the ground. Any one violating this 
by-law shall be subject to a fine of not less than one hundred dollars nor more 
than five hundred dollars." 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to adopt as a by-law for the 
Town the following: 

"Owners of land whereon is located an abandoned well or a well in use shall either 
provide a covering for such well capable of sustaining a weight of three hundred 
pounds or shall fill the same to the level of the ground. Any one violating this 
by-law shall be subject to a fine of not less than one hundred dollars nor more 
than five hundred dollars." 

A quorum was present . 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to adopt as boundary descriptions of 
Business Zones, in lieu of the descriptions shown on the 1936 Zoning Map, adopted at 
the Town Meeting of March 9, 1936; and as subsequently amended by vote of the Town 
Meetings on March 10, 1941; March 13, 1950; March 10, 1952; and March 17, 1958: the 
following descriptions of said Business Zones, and maps following said descriptions 
both on file with the Town Clerk. In the event of discrepancy, the word description 
will control. 

A. BALLARDVALE BUSINESS AREA 



Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Andover Street and Centre 
Street and running southerly along the center line of Andover Street to its inter- 
section with the westerly extension of the northerly lot line of Lot #6 on Town 
Assessors' Map #138; thence turning and running easterly along said northerly lot 
line and along a northerly lot line of Lot #7 on Town Assessors' Map #138 and the 
easterly extension of said Lot line to the center line of the right of way of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad; thence turning and proceeding southerly along said center 
line to its intersection with the center line of Andover Street; thence turning and 
proceeding easterly and southeasterly along the center line of Andover Street to its 
intersection with the center line of River Street; thence turning and proceeding 
southerly along the center line of River Street to a point on the easterly extension 
of the southerly line of Lot #153 on Town Assessors' Map #139; thence turning and 
proceeding west by said easterly extension and by said southerly line of Lot #153 
to the east bank of the Shawsheen River; thence continuing west in a straight line 
from the last mentioned point to the southeast corner of Lot #39 on Town Assessors' 
Map #157; thence turning and running westerly along the southerly lot line of said 
Lot #39 to its intersection with the southeasterly boundary of Lot #26 on Town 
Assessors' Map #138; thence turning and running northwesterly in a straight line to 
a point which is on the line dividing Lots #27 and #28 on Town Assessors' Map #138 
and one hundred feet (100') from the southwesterly side of Andover Street, measured 
perpendicularly to Andover Street; thence turning and running northerly in a straight 
line to a point on the center line of Church Street which is seventy-five feet (75') 
from the westerly side of Andover Street; thence turning and running westerly along 
the center line of Church Street to its intersection with the center line of Centre 
Street; thence turning and running northerly and northeasterly along the center line 
of Centre Street to the point of beginning. 

B. ANDOVER CENTRAL BUSINESS AREAS (Ref. Maps #54-55) 

1 . (Essex Street Area ) 

Beginning at the intersection of the center line of Essex Street and the center line 
of the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way; thence turning and proceeding south- 
erly by the center line of the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way to a point 
which is one hundred and twenty feet (120') south of the southerly line of Essex 
Street, measured perpendicular thereto; thence turning and running northwesterly and 
westerly by a line parallel to and one hundred and twenty feet (120') south of the 
southerly line of Essex Street to the center of the Shawsheen River; thence turning 
and proceeding northerly along the center line of said river to a point which is two 
hundred feet (200') northerly from the northerly line of Essex Street, measured per- 



63 



pendicular thereto; thence turning and running northeasterly and easterly along 
several courses by a line which is parallel to and two hundred feet (200' ) northerly 
from the northerly side of Essex Street to the intersection of said line with the 
center line of the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way; thence turning and run- 
ning southerly along said center line to the point of beginning. 

2. Essex Street, Brook Street and Central Street Area (Ref. Map #55) 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Essex Street and Central Street 
and running southwesterly along the center line of Central Street to the center line 
of the Rogers Brook easement, under the Town-taking of September 10th, 1963; thence 
turning and running westerly along said center line of Rogers Brook to its inter- 
section with the center line of Brook Street; thence turning and running northwest- 
erly along said center line of Brook Street to the center line of Essex Street; 
thence turning and running easterly along the center line of Essex Street to the 
point of beginning. 

3. Pearson Street and Essex Street Area (Ref. Map #55) 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Essex Street and Pearson Street 
and running easterly along the center line of Pearson Street to its intersection 
with the center line of North Main Street; thence turning and running southeasterly 
along the center line of North Main Street to its intersection with the center line 
of Essex Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of Essex 
Street to the point of beginning. 

4. Park, High, Elm & North Main Street Area (Ref. Maps #38-39) 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Florence Street and Park Street 
and running northwesterly along the center line of Florence Street to a point on the 
easterly extension of the southerly lot line of Lot #11 on Assessors' Map, #39; 
thence turning and running westerly along said easterly extension and along said 
southerly lot line to the easterly lot line of Lot #8 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence 
turning and running northerly along said easterly lot line of Lot #8 on Assessors' 
Map #39 to its intersection with the southerly line of Lot #17; thence turning and 
running westerly along the southerly line of Lot #17 on Assessors' Map, #39 to the 
southwesterly corner of Lot #17; thence turning and running northwesterly along the 
southwesterly line of Lot #17 and its northwesterly extension to the center line of 
Elm Street; thence turning and running northeasterly along the center line of Elm 
Street to its intersection with the southeasterly extension of the center line of 
Elm Court; thence turning and running northwesterly along said southeasterly exten- 
sion and along said center line of Elm Court to the easterly extension of the south- 
erly lot line of Lot #120 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence turning and running wester- 
ly along said easterly extension and along said southerly lot line of Lot #120 to 
the easterly lot line of Lot #115 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence turning and running 
southerly along the easterly lot line of Lot #115 to the southeast corner of said 
Lot #115; thence turning and running westerly along the southerly lot line of Lot 
#115 and its westerly extension to the center line of High Street; thence turning 
and running northerly along the center line of High Street to a point on the easter- 
ly extension of the southerly lot line of Lot #56 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence 
turning and running westerly along said easterly extension and along said southerly 
lot line to the southwesterly corner of Lot #56 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence turn- 
ing and running northerly along the westerly lot line of Lot #56 and along the east- 
erly lot line of Lot #51 on Assessors' Map, #38 to the southerly lot line of Lot 
#65 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence turning and running westerly along said southerly 
line of Lot #65 and along the southerly lot line of Lot #48A on Assessors' Map, #38 
and its westerly extension to the center line of North Main Street; thence turning 
and running southerly along the center line of North Main Street to the center line 
of Lewis Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of Lewis 
Street to a point on a line which is one hundred feet (100') from the westerly side 
line of North Main Street; thence turning and running southerly along a line one 
hundred (100') westerly from and parallel to the westerly side of North Main Street 
to the center line of Pearson Street; thence turning and running easterly along the 
center line of Pearson Street to the center line of North Main Street; thence turn- 
ing and running southeasterly and southerly along the center line of North Main 



64 



Street and the center line of Main Street to its intersection with the center line 
of Park Street; thence turning and running easterly along the center line of Park 
Street to the point of beginning. 

5 . Punchard Avenue, Main Street, Bartlett Street, 

Chestnut & Park Streets (Ref. Map #39) 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Main Street and Park Street and 
running southerly along the center line of Main Street to the center line of Punch- 
ard Avenue; thence turning and running easterly along the center line of Punchard 
Avenue to a point on the southerly extension of the westerly lot line of Lot #46 on 
Assessors' Map #39, thence turning and running northerly along said southerly exten- 
sion and along said westerly lot line of Lot #46 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence 
turning and running easterly along the northerly lot line of Lot #46 to the easterly 
lot line of Lot #41 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence turning and running northerly 
along the easterly lot lines of Lots #41 and #40 on Assessors' Map, #39 to the south- 
erly lot line of Lot #55 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence turning and running easterly 
along the southerly lot line of Lot #55 on Assessors' Map, #39 to the southeast cor- 
ner of Lot #55; thence turning and running northerly along the easterly lot line of 
Lot#55 to the southerly lot line of Lot #54 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence turning 
and running easterly along the southerly lot line of Lot #54 and its easterly exten- 
sion to the center line of Bartlett Street; thence turning and running northerly 
along the center line of Bartlett Street to the center line of Chestnut Street; 
thence turning and running westerly along the center line of Chestnut Street to a 
point on the southerly extension of the westerly lot line of Lot #33 on Assessors' 
Map, #39; thence turning and running northerly along said southerly extension and 
along said westerly lot line to the southerly lot line of Lot #28 on Assessors' Map 
#39; thence turning and running easterly along the southerly lot line of Lot #28 
and its easterly extension across Bartlett Street and along the southerly lot line 
of Lot #104 on Assessors' Map #39 to the westerly lot line of Lot #103 on Assessors' 
Map, #39; thence turning and running southerly along the westerly lot line of Lot 
#103 to the southwest corner of said Lot #103; thence turning and running easterly 
along the southerly lot lines of Lots #103, #102, #101, #100, and #98 on Assessors' 
Map #39 to the southeast corner of Lot #98; thence turning and running northerly 
along the easterly lot line of Lot #98 and its northerly extension to the center 
line of Park Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of 
Park Street to the point of beginning. 

6 . Central, Main and Chestnut Streets Area 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Central Street and Main Street 
and running southwesterly along the center line of Central Street to the center line 
of the Rogers Brook easement under the Town-taking of September 10, 1963; thence 
turning and running easterly along said center line of Rogers Brook to the north- 
westerly extension of the northeasterly lot line of Lot #89 on Assessors' Map #55; 
thence turning and running southeasterly along said northwesterly extension and 
along said northeasterly lot line of Lot #89 and its southeasterly extension to the 
center line of Chestnut Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center 
line of Chestnut Street to a point on the northwesterly extension of the southwester- 
ly lot line of Lot #104 on Assessors' Map, #55; thence turning and running southeast- 
erly along said northwesterly extension and along said southwesterly lot line to a 
northwesterly lot line of Lot #127 on Assessors' Map, #55; thence turning and run- 
ning southwesterly along said northwesterly lot line of Lot #127; thence turning and 
proceeding southeasterly along the southwesterly lot line of Lot #127 to a point on 
the southwesterly extension of the northwesterly lot line of Lot #126 on Assessors' 
Map #55; thence turning and proceeding northeasterly along said southwesterly exten- 
sion to the southwest corner of Lot #126; thence turning and running southeasterly 
along the southwesterly lot lines of Lots 126 and 125 on Assessors' Map #55; thence 
turning and running northeasterly along the southeasterly lot line of Lot #125 and 
its northeasterly extension to the center line of Main Street; thence turning and 
running northwesterly along the center line of Main Street to the point of beginning. 

7. Florence and Park Streets Area (Ref. Map #39) 
All of Lots #83, #84, #85, #86, and #87 as shown on Town Assessors' Map #39; and 



65 



portions of Florence Street and Park Street adjacent to said lots and extending to 
the center lines of said streets. 

C. SHAWSHEEN BUSINESS AREA (Ref. Map #36) 

1 . Balmoral Street and Main Street 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of North Main Street and Balmoral 
Street and running easterly along the center line of Balmoral Street to the center 
line of the Shawsheen River; thence turning and running southerly along said center 
line to the easterly extension of the southerly lot line of Lot #94 on Assessors' 
Map #36; thence turning and running westerly along said easterly extension and along 
said southerly lot line and its westerly extension to the center line of North Main 
Street; thence turning and running northerly along the center line of North Main 
Street to the point of beginning. 

2. Lowell, North Main, Haverhill, Poor (Ref. Map #52) 
and Riverina Streets 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Windsor and Poor Streets and 
running southeasterly along the center line of Poor Street to its intersection with 
the northerly extension of the westerly bound of Lot #90 on Assessors' Map #52; 
thence turning and running southerly along said extension and along said westerly 
bound of Lot #90 and its southerly extension to the center line of Lowell Street; 
thence turning and running easterly along the center lines of Lowell and Haverhill 
Streets to the center line of Riverina Road; thence turning and running northerly 
along the center line of Riverina Road to a point on the easterly extension of the 
southerly lot line of Lot #5, on Assessors' Map, #52; thence turning and running 
westerly along said extension and along said southerly lot line to its intersection 
with the southeasterly lot line of Lot #30 on Assessors' Map #52; thence turning 
and running southwesterly along the southeasterly line of Lot #30 to the southerly 
line of Lot #30; thence turning and running westerly along the southerly line of Lot 
#30 and its extension to the center line of North Main Street; thence turning and 
running northerly along the center line of North Main Street to the center line of 
Windsor Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of Windsor 
Street to the point of beginning. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to act on Article 36 in three groups as 
follows : 

1. — Section A, Section B-l, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 

2. — Section B-7 

3. — Section C-l & 2 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to adopt as boundary descriptions of Busi- 
ness Zones, in lieu of the descriptions shown on the 1936 Zoning Map, adopted at the 
Town Meeting of March 9, 1936; and as subsequently amended by vote of the Town Meet- 
ings on March 10, 1941; March 13, 1950; March 10, 1952; and March 17, 1958; the fol- 
lowing descriptions of said Business Zones, and maps following said descriptions 
both on file with the Town Clerk. In the event of discrepancy, the word descrip- 
tion will control. 

GROUP 1 

A. BALLARDVALE BUSINESS AREA 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Andover Street and Centre 
Street and running southerly along the center line of Andover Street to its inter- 
section with the westerly extension of the northerly lot line of Lot #6 on Town 
Assessors' Map #138; thence turning and running easterly along said northerly lot 
line and along a northerly lot line of Lot #7 on Town Assessors' Map #138 and the 
easterly extension of said lot line to the center line of the right of way of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad; thence turning and proceeding southerly along said center 



66 






line to its intersection with the center line of Andover Street; thence turning and 
proceeding easterly and southeasterly along the center line of Andover Street to its 
intersection with the center line of River Street; thence turning and proceeding 
southerly along the center line of River Street to a point on the easterly extension 
of the southerly line of Lot #153 on Town Assessors' Map #139; thence turning and 
proceeding west by said easterly extension and by said southerly line of Lot #153 to 
the east bank of the Shawsheen River; thence continuing west in a straight line from 
the last mentioned point to the southeast corner of Lot #39 on Town Assessors' Map 
#157; thence turning and running westerly along the southerly lot line of said Lot 
#39 to its intersection with the southeasterly boundary of Lot #26 on Town Assessors' 
Map #138; thence turning and running northwesterly in a straight line to a point 
which is on the line dividing Lots #27 and #28 on Town Assessors' Map #138 and one 
hundred feet (100') from the southwesterly side of Andover Street, measured perpen- 
dicularly to Andover Street; thence turning and running northerly in a straight line 
to a point on the center line of Church Street which is seventy-five feet (75') from 
the westerly side of Andover Street; thence turning and running westerly along the 
center line of Church Street to its intersection with the center line of Centre 
Street; thence turning and running northerly and northeasterly along the center 
line of Centre Street to the point of beginning. 
B. ANDOVER CENTRAL BUSINESS AREAS (Ref. Maps #54-55) 

1. (Essex Street Area) 



Beginning at the intersection of the center line of Essex Street and the center line 
of the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way; thence turning and proceeding souther- 
ly by the center line of the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way to a point which 
is one hundred and twenty feet (120') south of the southerly line of Essex Street, 
measured perpendicular thereto; thence turning and running northwesterly and westerly 
by a line parallel to and one hundred and twenty feet (120') south of the southerly 
line of Essex Street to the center of the Shawsheen River; thence turning and pro- 
ceeding northerly along the center line of said river to a point which is two hundred 
feet (200') northerly from the northerly line of Essex Street, measured perpendicular 
thereto; thence turning and running northeasterly and easterly along several courses 
by a line which is parallel to and two hundred feet (200') northerly from the north- 
erly side of Essex Street to the intersection of said line with the center line of 
the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way; thence turning and running southerly 
along said center line to the point of beginning. 

2. Essex Street, Brook Street and Central Street Area (Ref. Map #55) 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Essex Street and Central Street 
and running southwesterly along the center line of Central Street to the easterly 
extension of the southerly line of Lot #48 on Assessors' Map #55; thence turning and 
running westerly along said extension and said southerly line of Lot #48 to the east- 
erly line of Lot #45. Thence turning and running northeasterly along said easterly 
line of lot #45 to the center line of Rogers Brook, thence turning and running north- 
westerly along said center line of Rogers Brook to its intersection with the center 
line of Brook Street; thence turning and running northwesterly along said center line 
of Brook Street to the center line of Essex Street; thence turning and running east- 
erly along the center line of Essex Street to the point of beginning. 

3. Pearson Street and Essex Street Area (Ref. Map #55) 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Essex Street and Pearson Street 
and running easterly along the center line of Pearson Street to its intersection with 
the center line of North Main Street; thence turning and running southeasterly along 
the center line of North Main Street to its intersection with the center line of 
Essex Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of Essex 
Street to the point of beginning. 

4. Park, High, Elm & North Main Street Area (Ref. Maps #38-39) 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Florence Street and Park Street 
and running northwesterly along the center line of Florence Street to a point on the 
easterly extension of the southerly lot line of Lot #11 on Assessors' Map, #39; 



67 



thence turning and running westerly along said easterly extension and along said 
southerly lot line to the easterly lot line of Lot #8 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence 
turning and running northerly along said easterly lot line of Lot #8 on Assessors' 
Map #39 to its intersection with the southerly line of Lot #17; thence turning and 
running westerly along the southerly line of Lot #17 on Assessors' Map, #39 to the 
southwesterly corner of Lot #17; thence turning and running northwesterly along the 
southwesterly line of Lot #17 and its northwesterly extension to the center line of 
Elm Street; thence turning and running northeasterly along the center line of Elm 
Street to its intersection with the southeasterly extension of the center line of 
Elm Court; thence turning and running northwesterly along said southeasterly exten- 
sion and along said center line of Elm Court to the easterly extension of the south- 
erly lot line of Lot #120 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence turning and running wester- 
ly along said easterly extension and along said southerly lot line of Lot #120 to 
the easterly lot line of Lot #115 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence turning and running 
southerly along the easterly lot line of Lot #115 to the southeast corner of said 
Lot #115; thence turning and running westerly along the southerly lot line of Lot 
#115 and its westerly extension to the center line of High Street; thence turning 
and running northerly along the center line of High Street to a point on the easterly 
extension of the southerly lot line of Lot #56 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence turning 
and running westerly along said easterly extension and along said southerly lot line 
to the southwesterly corner of Lot #56 on Assessors' Map, #38; thence turning and 
running northerly along the westerly lot line of Lot #56 and along the easterly lot 
line of Lot #51 on Assessors' Map, #38 to the southerly lot line of Lot #65 on Asses- 
sors' Map, #38; thence turning and running westerly along said southerly line of Lot 
#65 and along the southerly lot line of Lot #48A on Assessors' Map, #38 and its west- 
erly extension to the center line of North Main Street; thence turning and running 
southerly along the center line of North Main Street to the center line of Lewis 
Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of Lewis Street to 
a point on a line which is one hundred feet (100' ) from the westerly side line of 
North Main Street; thence turning and running southerly along a line one hundred 
(100') westerly from and parallel to the westerly side of North Main Street to the 
center line of Pearson Street; thence turning and running easterly along the center 
line of Pearson Street to the center line of North Main Street; thence turning and 
running southeasterly and southerly along the center line of North Main Street and 
the center line of Main Street to its intersection with the center line of Park 
Street; thence turning and running easterly along the center line of Park Street to 
the point of beginning. 

5. Punchard Avenue, Main Street, Bartlett Street (Ref. Map #39) 

Chestnut & Park Streets 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Main Street and Park Street and 
running southerly along the center line of Main Street to the center line of Punch- 
ard Avenue; thence turning and running easterly along the center line of Punchard 
Avenue to a point on the southerly extension of the westerly lot line of Lot #46 on 
Assessors' Map #39, thence turning and running northerly along said southerly exten- 
sion and along said westerly lot line of Lot #46 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence turn- 
ing and running easterly along the northerly lot line of Lot #46 to the easterly lot 
line of Lot #41 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence turning and running northerly along 
the easterly lot lines of Lots #41 and #40 on Assessors' Map, #39 to the southerly 
lot line of Lot #55 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence turning and running easterly along 
the southerly lot line of Lot #55 on Assessors' Map, #39 to the southeast corner of 
Lot #55; thence turning and running northerly along the easterly lot line of Lot #55 
to the southerly lot line of Lot #54 on Assessors' Map, #39; thence turning and run- 
ning easterly along the southerly lot line of Lot #54 and its easterly extension to 
the center line of Bartlett Street; thence turning and running northerly along the 
center line of Bartlett Street to the center line of Chestnut Street; thence turning 
and running westerly along the center line of Chestnut Street to a point on the 
southerly extension of the westerly lot line of Lot #33 on Assessors' Map, #39; 
thence turning and running northerly along said southerly extension and along said 
westerly lot line to the southerly lot line of Lot #28 on Assessors' Map #39; thence 
turning and running easterly along the southerly lot line of Lot #28 and its easterly 
extension across Bartlett Street and along the southerly lot line of Lot #104 on 
Assessors' Map #39 to the westerly lot line of Lot #103 on Assessors' Map, #39; 
thence turning and running southerly along the westerly lot line of Lot #103 to the 



68 



southwest corner of said Lot #103; thence turning and running easterly along the 
southerly lot lines of Lots #103, #102, #101, #100, and #98 on Assessors' Map #39 to 
the southeast corner of Lot #98; thence turning and running northerly along the east- 
erly lot line of Lot #98 and its northerly extension to the center line of Park 
Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of Park Street to 
the point of beginning. 

6. Central, Main and Chestnut Streets Area 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Central Street and Main Street 
and running southwesterly along the center line of Central Street to the center line 
of the Rogers Brook easement under the Town-taking of September 10, 1963; thence 
turning and running easterly along said center line of Rogers Brook to the north- 
westerly extension of the northeasterly lot line of Lot #89 on Assessors' Map #55; 
thence turning and running southeasterly along said northwesterly extension and 
along said northeasterly lot line of Lot #89 and its southeasterly extension to the 
center line of Chestnut Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center 
line of Chestnut Street to a point on the northwesterly extension of the southwest- 
erly lot line of Lot #104 on Assessors' Map, #55; thence turning and running south- 
easterly along said northwesterly extension and along said southwesterly lot line to 
a northwesterly lot line of Lot #127 on Assessors' Map, #55; thence turning and run- 
ningsouthwesterly along said northwesterly lot line of Lot #127; thence turning and 
proceeding southeasterly along the southwesterly lot line of Lot #127 to a point on 
the southwesterly extension of the northwesterly lot line of Lot #126 on Assessors' 
Map #55; thence turning and proceeding northeasterly along said southwesterly exten- 
sion to the southwest corner of Lot #126; thence turning and running southeasterly 
along the southwesterly lot lines of Lots 126 and 125 on Assessors' Map #55; thence 
turning and running northeasterly along the southeasterly lot line of Lot #125 and 
its northeasterly extension to the center line of Main Street; thence turning and 
running northwesterly along the center line of Main Street to the point of beginning, 

The Vote on Group 1 was YES 442-NO 4. Voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

GROUP 2 - B-7 was withdrawn 

GROUP 3 
C. SHAWSHEEN BUSINESS AREA (Ref . Map #36) 

1 . Balmoral Street and Main Street 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of North Main Street and Balmoral 
Street and running easterly along the center line of Balmoral Street to the center 
line of the Shawsheen River; thence turning and running southerly along said center 
line to the easterly extension of the southerly lot line of Lot #94 on Assessors' 
Map #36; thence turning and running westerly along said easterly extension and along 
said southerly lot line and its westerly extension to the center line of North Main 
Street; thence turning and running northerly along the center line of North Main 
Street to the point of beginning. 

2. Lowell, North Main, Haverhill, Poor (Ref. Map #52) 
and Riverina Streets 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Windsor and Poor Streets and 
running southeasterly along the center line of Poor Street to its intersection with 
tthe northerly extension of the westerly bound of Lot #90 on Assessors' Map #52; 
thence turning and running southerly along said extension and along said westerly 
bound of Lot #90 and its southerly extension to the center line of Lowell Street; 
thence turning and running easterly along the center lines of Lowell and Haverhill 
Streets to the center line of Riverina Road; thence turning and running northerly 
along the center line of Riverina Road to a point on the easterly extension of the 
southerly lot line of Lot #5, on Assessors' Map, #52; thence turning and running 
westerly along said extension and along said southerly lot line to its intersection 
with the southeasterly lot line of Lot #30 on Assessors' Map #52; thence turning and 
running southwesterly along the southeasterly line of Lot #30 to the southerly line 
Df Lot #30; thence turning and running westerly along the southerly line of Lot #30 



69 



and its extension to the center line of North Main Street; thence turning and run- 
ning northerly along the center line of North Main Street to the center line of 
Windsor Street; thence turning and running westerly along the center line of Windsor 
Street to the point of beginning. 

The Vote on GROUP 3 was unanimous . 

A quorum was present. A report of the Andover Planning Board relative to Article 36 
was read by Virginia Hammond, Secretary. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to change from a Business Zone to Single 
Residence A, the following parcel of land: Beginning at the intersection of the cen- 
ter lines of Essex Street and Red Spring Road and Shawsheen Road and running south- 
erly along the center line of Red Spring Road to a point on the easterly extension 
of the southerly lot line of Lot #12 on Assessors' Map #72; thence turning and run- 
ning westerly along said easterly extension and along said southerly lot line to a 
point which is fifty feet (50* ) from the westerly side line of Red Spring Road; 
thence turning and running northerly and northwesterly on a line which is parallel 
to and fifty feet (50') distant from the west side line of Red Spring Road & Shaw- 
sheen Road to the southerly line of Lot #14 on Assessors' Map, #72; thence turning 
and running easterly along the southerly lot line of Lot #14 and its easterly exten- 
sion to the center line of Shawsheen Road; thence turning and running southeasterly 
along the center line of Shawsheen Road to the point of beginning. 

Meaning and intending hereby to eliminate a business zone which existed immediately 
west of the intersection of Essex Street, Shawsheen Road and Red Spring Road along 
the westerly side of Shawsheen Road and Red Spring Road. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to change from Business Zone 
to Single Residence A, the following parcel of land: Beginning at the intersection 
of the center lines of Essex Street and Red Spring Road and Shawsheen Road and run- 
ning southerly along the center line of Red Spring Road to a point on the easterly 
extension of the southerly lot line of Lot #12 on Assessors' Map #72; thence turning 
and running westerly along said easterly extension and along said southerly lot line 
to a point which is fifty feet (50') from the westerly side line of Red Spring Road; 
thence turning and running northerly and northwesterly on a line which is parallel 
to and fifty feet (50') distant from the west side line of Red Spring Road & Shaw- 
sheen Road to the southerly line of Lot #14 on Assessors' Map, #72; thence turning 
and running easterly along the southerly lot line of Lot #14 and its easterly exten- 
sion to the center line of Shawsheen Road; thence turning and running southeasterly 
along the center line of Shawsheen Road to the point of beginning. 

Meaning and intending hereby to eliminate a business zone which existed immediately 
west of the intersection of Essex Street, Shawsheen Road and Red Spring Road along 
the westerly side of Shawsheen Road and Red Spring Road. A quorum was present. A 
report of the Andover Planning Board relative to Article 37 was read by Virginia 
Hammond, Secretary . 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to change from a Business Zone to Single 
Residence A, the following parcel of land: Beginning at the intersection of the cen- 
ter line of North Main Street with the Lawrence/ Andover City & Town Line and running 
southerly along the center line of North Main Street to a point on the easterly ex- 
tension of the southerly lot line of Lot #45 on Assessors' Map #51; thence turning 
and running westerly along said extension and along said lot line to a point which 
is 150' westerly from North Main Street; thence turning and running northerly along 
a line which is 150' from and parallel to North Main Street to its intersection with 
the Lawrence/ Andover City & Town line to the point of beginning. 

Meaning and intending thereby to eliminate a business zone which existed adjacent to 
the Lawrence/ Andover City & Town line and immediately west of North Main Street. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to change from a Business Zone 
to Single Residence A, the following parcel of land: Beginning at the intersection 
of the center line of North Main Street with the Lawrence/ Andover City & Town line 
and running southerly along the center line of North Main Street to a point on the 



70 



easterly extension of the southerly lot line of Lot #45 on Assessors' Map #51; 
thence turning and running westerly along said extension and along said lot line to 
a point which is 150' westerly from North Main Street; thence turning and running 
northerly along a line which is 150' from and parallel to North Main Street to its 
intersection with the Lawrence/ Andover City & Town line to the point of beginning. 

Meaning and intending thereby to eliminate a business zone which existed adjacent to 
the Lawrence/ Andover City & Town line and immediately west of North Main Street. 

A quorum was present. A report of the Andover Planning Board relative to Article 38 
was read by Virginia Hammond, Secretary. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to change from Garden Apartments Dis- 
trict to Business District the following described parcel of real estate: A parcel 
of land situated in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, bounded and described as 
follows : 

Beginning at the northerly abutment of the bridge across the Shawsheen River and 
on the easterly side of North Main Street, thence running northerly by said Main 
Street 1033 feet more or less, to land of now or formerly Ellen Ayer Wood; thence 
easterly at right angles 130 feet more or less by land now or formerly of Ellen Ayer 
Wood, to the Shawsheen River; thence running southerly in a straight line to the 
Shawsheen River at a point 150 feet northeasterly from the easterly line of North 
Main Street; thence running southwesterly by the Shawsheen River 150 feet to the 
point of beginning, containing three acres of land, more or less. Being a portion 
of the premises described in a deed recorded with Essex North Registry of Deeds, 
Book 981, Page 157, on petition of William D'Annolfo, trustee of Washington Park 
Trust and others . 

ARTICLE 39 was not moved. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to direct the appointment of a committee 
of five to make a preliminary investigation of the feasibility of automating the 
Town's accounting and clerical operations, to determine whether or not the services 
of an expert consultant are required and to report its findings to the Board of 
Selectmen not later than December 31, 1964; the committee to consist of the Town 
Manager, a representative from the School Committee and three citizens designated by 
the Board of Selectmen, on petition of the Andover Taxpayers' Association. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to direct the appointment of a committee 
of five to make a preliminary investigation of the feasibility of automating the 
Town's accounting and clerical operations, to determine whether or not the services 
of an expert consultant are required and to report its findings to the Board of 
Selectmen not later than December 31, 1964; the committee to consist of the Town 
Manager, a representative designated by the School Committee and three citizens 
designated by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, 
Patricia Circle, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown on a plan entitled 
"Sub Division of Land in Andover, Mass. 'Patricia Acres', Owner George Davis, plan 
by Andover Engineers, Inc., dated May 31, 1960" approved by the Andover Planning 
Board on July 21, 1960, which plan is recorded in the North Essex District Registry 
( of Deeds as Plan No. 4135, a copy of which plan is on file in the office of the Town 
I Clerk, or what action it will take thereon, on petition of Leonard A. Cookson and 
others . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 41 as printed. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Saga- 
more Drive running southerly from its intersection with Sheridan Road, the area 
leading to and including the traffic circle at the most southerly end of said Saga- 
more Drive, it being that portion of Sagamore Drive not already accepted by said 
Town as a public way, and as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled "Academy Acres, owner Roy R. Farr" 
and recorded with the Essex Registry of Deeds for the Northern District as Desk Plan 



71 



No. 4095. A plan also being on file with the Town Clerk for the Town of Andover , on 
petition of Roy R. Farr and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 42 as printed, subject 
to approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way and 
naine^ a private way now known as Sherry Drive, as laid out by the Selectmen, as shown 
on a plan by Andover Engineers, Inc., Numbered 3367, dated October 26, 1956, duly 
recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds October 26, 1956. The of- 
fice of Town Clerk now has on file a plan and description of this way, on petition 
of Ruth T. Stevens and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 43 as printed, subject to 
approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way and 
name, a private way now known as Margery Circle, located off Lowell Street, as shown 
on a plan drawn by Arthur M. King, Reg. C. E. and Surveyor and duly recorded in the 
North Essex Registry of Deeds as plan #4569, in accordance with plan and description 
on file with the Town Clerk's office, on petition of Robert A. Flannery and others, 
and as approved by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 44 as printed, subject to 
approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, 
Rolling Ridge Road as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Street Acceptance Plan of 
Rolling Ridge Road, Andover, Mass., Scale l"-40' , Dated January 15, 1963; Clinton 
Foster Goodwin, Reg. Prof. Eng . , 25 Washington Sq., Haverhill, Mass." a legal descrip- 
tion of which, together with the afore-mentioned plan are on file at the office of 
the Town Clerk, on petition of James H. Eaton III and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 45 as printed. The Vote 
YES 119, NO 93. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town of Andover will accept Forest Drive, Farrwood 
Drive and Arrowood Lane as public ways and names, as laid out by the Selectmen, all 
said ways appearing on a Subdivision Plan of Farrwood Forest, Andover, as Plan No. 
4643, duly recorded in Essex North District Registry of Deeds, on petition of Roy R. 
Farr and others . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 46 as printed, subject 
to approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Car- 
riage Hill Road as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, Carriage 
Hill Estates, Wyncrest Development Corporation" drawn by C. J. Kitson Corp., Engi- 
neer, 256 Westford Street, Lowell, Mass., and recorded with North Essex Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 4716. Both plan and description along with easement for drainage 
and utility easements for recording purposes being also on file with the Town Clerk 
for the Town of Andover, on petition of John Fulton and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 47 as printed, subject to 
approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way and 
name, Brentwood Circle as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled, "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan 'Wood 
Ridge', Owner, Arthur A. Collins Realty, Inc., approved October 9, 1962, Engineer, 
George E. Hayes," said plan being recorded in the North District of Essex Registry 
of Deeds as Plan #4644. Plan and description, along with drainage and utility ease- 
ments for recording purposes being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of 
Arthur A.Collins and others. 



72 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 48 as printed, subject 
to approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways and names, 
Shaw Drive, Tobey Lane, Meadow Brook Drive, Sandy Brook Circle, Random Lane, and 
Hunter Drive, as shown on the plan which has been approved by the Andover Planning 
Board, said ways being shown on a Plan entitled "Wildwood Acres Cluster Zone, Ando- 
ver, Mass.' drawn by Fred A. Joyce, Surveyor and recorded on Plan No. 4342 in the 
North Essex Registry of Deeds, plan and description, along with drainage and utility 
easements for recording purposes, being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of 
George DeVries and others, subject to approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 49 as printed. 

ARTICLE 50. To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 50 as printed. 

ARTICLE 51 . To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 5:00 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



IRVING O. PIPER 
TOWN CLERK 



73 



MARCH 7, 1964 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, February 24, 1964, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs met and assembled in the 
Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street on Saturday, the seventh day of March, 1964 at 
9 :30 o'clock A. M. 

After Article 6 of the Adjourned Town Meeting was acted on, the Special Town Meet- 
ing was opened at 11 o'clock A. M. 

A quorum was present. 

It was voted to dispense with reading of warrant and return of service by the con- 
stable . 

(CONSTABLE'S RETURN) 

Essex, SS. March 7, 1964 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said town, to meet at the time and 
place and for the purpose stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the town house, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To see whether the Town will vote to approve or disapprove the amount 
of debt (to wit: $3,250,000.00) authorized by the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocation- 
al-Technical High School District Committee at a meeting held on February 18, 1964, 
for the purpose of constructing and equipping a regional vocational-technical high 
school building. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town approve the amount of debt 
(to wit: $3,250,000.00) authorized by the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational-Tech- 
nical High School District Committee at a meeting held on February 18, 1964, for the 
purpose of constructing and equipping a regional vocational-technical high school 
building. A quorum was present. 

Upon motion duly seconded, the special town meeting adjourned at 11:15 A. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 

IRVING 0. PIPER 
TOWN CLERK 

NOTE: — A Special Town Meeting was held on June 15, 1964 at the Andover High School 
Auditorium. 

Since most of the meeting was devoted to revision of the Zoning By-laws and the 
records are extremely lengthy, they have not been included in this annual report. 
Information may be obtained from the Town Clerk's records or the Planning Board. 



74 






OCTOBER 19, 1964 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, September 28, 1964, the Inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Andover , qualified to vote in Town Affairs, met and assembled at 
the Memorial Auditorium, Bartlet Street, on Monday, the nineteenth day of October, 
1964 at 7:30 P. M. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 1505 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Charles G. Hatch, Moderator at 7:45 P. M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit nineteen non-voters to the meeting, and to 
have Mr. Bowen, Town Manager address the meeting. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. J. Allyn Bradford. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman William Stewart. 

Voted to dispense with the reading of the warrant and service of the Constable. 

(Constable's Return) 

Essex, SS. Andover, October 19, 1964 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Thomas P. Eldred, Constable 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $507.97 for the purpose of refunding this amount to Philip I. Gaudet of 17 Cuba 
Street, Andover; said sum representing $500.00 paid by him for land at the May 22, 
1963 tax sale and a pro forma tax of $7.97, but, due to an invalid taking, the Town 
of Andover having acquired no title to said land which it could convey. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $507.97 under Article 1. 

ARTI CLE 2 . To see if the Town will transfer from available funds the sum of 
$192.70 for two weeks salary due Mr. Christy M. Robinson, a teacher in the school de- 
partment, for the year i960. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds the sum 
i of $192.70 under Article 2. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to appropriate by transfer 
J from available funds the sum of TWO HUNDRED FIFTY DOLLARS ($250.00) to be paid to 
I Whipple and Magane, Realtors and Appraisers, Andover, Mass., for services rendered 
i in the examination, investigation, analysis, valuation, and preparation of an ap- 
r praisal report of property owned by Elizabeth A. Gurry, 26 Wildwood Road, Andover, 
J Mass . , said work having been undertaken and completed in 1963. 



75 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds the sum of 
$250.00 under Article 3. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to change the name of a town-accepted 
street Margery Circle to Chadwick Circle, on the petition of Gertrude M. and Roger W. 
Eckfeldt and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 4 as read. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will advise the School Building Committee on whether 
the new high school plans should contain space for: 

a. approximately 1800 pupils 

b. approximately 1500 pupils 

c. approximately 1200 pupils 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to advise the School Building Committee 
that the new high school plans should contain space for approximately 1200 pupils. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will advise the School Building Committee on whether 
the new high school plans should contain an auditorium with a seating capacity of: 

a. approximately 1800 persons 

b. approximately 1500 persons 

c. approximately 1200 persons 
c. approximately 1000 persons 

Article 6 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will advise the School Building Committee on whether 
the new high school plans should contain a swimming pool. 

Article 7 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of six million five hun- 
dred thousand dollars ($6,500,000) or any other sum, for the construction and equip- 
ping of a new high school and to determine whether the Town will appropriate money 
therefor to be provided by transfer from available funds or by borrowing by the is- 
suance of bonds for not more than twenty years. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the sum of $3,910,000 be appropriated 
for constructing, originally equipping and furnishing a new high school and that to 
meet this appropriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, be author- 
ized to issue $3,910,000 of bonds or notes of the Town for not more than twenty years, 
under Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948 as amended. The VOTE -YES-574, NO-196 . Voted 
by more than 2/3 as required. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town of Andover will vote to appropriate by transfer 
from available funds the sum of three thousand and five hundred dollars ($3,500.) 
for the preparation of classification and compensation plans for Town employees in- 
cluding non-professional school personnel. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer from available funds the sum of 
$3,500. under Article 9. 

A quorum count was taken at 12:30 A. M. before action on Article 10 and the count 
showed that there was still a quorum present-451. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence C to 
Shopping Center District the land described as follows: 

Beginning on Lowell Street at the southerly corner of Lot #13 (Assessors' Map #151) 
and running northeasterly along Lowell Street by Lots #13 and #12 (Assessors' Map 
#151) to Lot #11 (Assessors' Map #151), thence northerly and easterly by Lot #11 to 
the corner of Lot #9 (Assessors' Map #151), thence northwesterly by Lots #9, 8, 7, 6, 



76 I 



5, 4, 3, (Assessors' Map #151), thence northeasterly by Lot #3 to Greenwood Road, 
thence northwesterly by Greenwood Road to Lot #1, (Assessors' Map #151), thence 
southwesterly, northwesterly by Lot #1 to the corner of Lot #2, (Assessors' Map #150) 
thence northwesterly by Lot #1 to the corner of Lot #2, (Assessors' Map #150), thence 
northwesterly by Lot #2, (Assessors' Map #150) to Route 93, thence southeasterly by 
Sloute 93 to Lot 14A (Assessors' Map #151), thence northeasterly and southeasterly by 
Lots 14A, and 15 to Lowell Street and the point of beginning. 

(Description meaning to include in the Shopping Center District, Lots 2, 
6A, 12, 13 and 14 as shown on Assessors' Map #151). 

ARTICLE 11. To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 12:55 A. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



IRVING 0. PIPER 
TOWN CLERK 



77 



JURY LIST 



JURY LIST PROCEDURE 



Selectmen submit names of prospective 
jurors . 

These names are checked against the 
current jury list and if there are no 
duplications, questionnaires are sent 
to all names submitted. 

When all questionnaires are returned, 
the Town Clerk's office prepares a 
new list. 

Jurors are kept on the list for three 
years unless called for jury duty. When 
a name has been selected, it automatically 
is removed from the list. At the end of 
three years, new questionnaires are sent 
to these people. In other words, no one 
is entered on the jury list without first 
answering a questionnaire. 

Copies of jury list are sent to Superior 
Court in Boston, Salem, Lawrence and the 
local Chief of Police. 






6. One list is used to cut up for the jury 
box. From this box, the Selectmen draw 
names of jurors after Constable brings in 
the request . 



78 



Adams, Helen W. 
Ainscow, Elizabeth C. 
Anderson, Charles W. Jr. 
Anderson, Ernest E. 
Baker, Richard W. Jr. 
Ball, J. Rodney 
Barnard, Elizabeth F. D. 
Barraclough, Norman 
Barron, Thomas L. 
Barrett, John J. 
Barss , Helen W. 
Barton, Joseph F. 
Belka, Madeline A. 
Benson, Norman F. 
Bernardin, Mary V. 
Best, George E. 
Birdsall, Ernest L. 
Blake, Winston A. 
Bolia, Margery E. 
Boutwell, Everett S. 
Bradley, Frederick W. 
Broderick, Helen T. 
Bronson, Henry G. 
Brown, Will G. Jr. 
Bruce, George R. 
Byrne, Beatrice M. 
Calcina, Carmelo 
Campopiano, Joseph 
Cardella, Giuseppe 
Carmichael , James G. 
Carpentier, Albert L. 
Caswell, Helen E. 
Chadwick, Harry 
Chase, Dorothy 0. 
Clough, Harry E. 
Coates, Theodore P. 
Cole, Arthur W. 
Cole, Ralph K. 
Collins, J. Everett 
Connolly, Alice 
Connolly, Thomas J. 
Cookson, Francis R. 
Cookson, Harold 
Cordts , Selma J. 
Custer, Charles J. 
Cutler, Granville K. 
Daly, P. Francis 
Danforth, Philip F. 
DeBell, Charles W. 
Deneu, Frank P. 
Dennison, Harold 
DeQuattro, Alfred 
DesRoches, Robert F. 



Housewife 

Housewife 

Accountant 

Poultryman 

Serviceman 

Bank Examiner 

Housewife 

Controller 

Transportation 

Retired 

Housewife 

Dairy Shipper 

Housewife 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Office Manager 

Accountant 

Food Broker 

Homemaker 

Warehouse 

Self-employed 

Insurance Clerk 

Auto Dealer 

Retired 

Salesman 

Housewife 

Service Manager 

Real Est. & Ins. 

Insurance 

Sales Supervisor 

Engr. Manager 

Manager-part time 

Carpenter 

Housewife 

Insurance Agent 

Management Officer 

Retired 

Cotton Broker 

Retired 

Cafe . Worker 

Postal Clerk 

Photographer 

Sales Manager 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Metal Worker 

Clerk 

Bank President 

Asst. Works Manager 

Mach . Technician 

Asst. Treasurer 

Spray Painter 

Asst. Vice Pres . 



30 Pasho Street 

59 Love joy Road 

73 High Street 

100 Ballardvale Road 

123 Red Spring Road 

10 Lincoln Circle 
187 Chestnut Street 

8 Punchard Avenue 
430 Lowell Street 
12 Henderson Avenue 
Off Torr Street 

34 Florence Street 

58 Red Spring Road 

6 Westwind Road 

11 Abbot Street 

4 Argyle Street 

15 Pasho Street 

5 Stratford Road 

14 Riverina Road 
408 High Plain Road 

7 Central Lane 

37 Enmore Street 
7 Chandler Road 
63 Abbot Street 
33 Center Street 

19 Canterbury Street 
21 Magnolia Avenue 
2 Hidden Road 

6 Punchard Avenue 

59 Whittier Street 
5 Old South Lane 

5 Dumbarton Street 
160 Lowell Street 
77 Whittier Street 
117 Chestnut Street 
46 Woburn Street 

16 High Street 

15 Marion Avenue 

35 Summer Street 
18 Avon Street 
18 Avon Street 
123 Main Street 
197 River Road 
18 Wildwood Road 

38 Canterbury Street 
99 Shawsheen Road 

15 Cuba Street 

9 Forbes Lane 
11 Oriole Drive 
40 Chandler Road 
83 High Street 
73 School Street 
103 Reservation Road 



79 



Deyermond, Eileen A. 
Deyermond, John 
Deyermond, Robert V. 
Doner ty, Joseph B. 
Dolan, Henry J. 
Domingue, Robert P. 
Donahue, Frank W. 
Dow, Helen P. 
Dubocq, William E. 
Duffy, Elizabeth I. 
Duffy, Joseph G. 
Dufton, Virginia R. 
Dunbar, Mary C. 
Dunn, Ruth L. 
Eastman, Weston D. 
Elliott, Fay H. 
Farnsworth, Nathalie B. 
Ferrier, Robert L. 
Forbes, Elizabeth W. 
Forbes, John M. 
Foss, Ray A. 
Fox, Pauline B. 
Froburg, Frank W. 
Garrison, Jedediah L. 
Gill, Friedl P. 
Glendinning, Eve C. 
Goddard, Harold C. Jr. 
Goldthwaite, Eleanor F. 
Gordon, Katherine M. 
Gordon, Walter N. 
Grant, Dwight W. 
Hall, John W. Jr. 
Haselton, Mabel M. 
Hatton, Robert B. 
Hayes, Ruth 
Heseltine, Eleanor M. 
Higgins , Forrest E. 
Higgins, Frederick A. 
Hoffman, Joseph W. 
Hogan, Daniel E. Jr. 
Homsey, Emily W. 
Hoyer, Raymond A. 
Kibbee, Arthur S. 
Knipe, Edith E. 
Lake, Janet D. 
Lambert, John F. 
Lancaster, Daniel J. 
Leacock, John H. 
Letters, James V. Jr. 
Locke, Arthur T. 
Locke, Benjamin W. 
Look, Robert E. 
Low, Thomas W. 



Housewife 

Retired 

Retired 

Real Est. and Ins. 

P. 0. Foreman 

Foreman 

Refrigeration 

Housewife 

Retired 

Real Estate Broker 

Sales Manager 

At Home 

Tutor 

Housewife 

Real Est. and Ins. 

Retired 

Housewife 

Electrician 

Sports Teacher 

Traffic Manager 

Retired 

Dental Hygienist 

Self-employed 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Accountant 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Maintenance 

Supervisor 

Groundskeeper 

At Home 

Chem. Engineer 

At Home 

Housewife 

C. P. A. 

Construction 

Contractor 

Corporation Pres . 

Desk Clerk 

Self-employed 

Truck Driver 

Reg. Nurse 

Housewife 

Retired 

Printer 

Groundsman 

Exper. Machinist 

Clerk 

Devel. Machinist 

Account Manager 

Prod. Control 



64 Andover Street 
79 Memorial Circle 
91 Elm Street 

11 Locke Street 
99 Chestnut Street 
51 Walnut Avenue 
35 River Road 

8 Beacon Street 
99 Central Street 
97 Lovejoy Road 

4 Arundel Street 
7 Argyle Street 

9 Holt Road 

9 Sutherland Street 
18 Argyle Street 

84 Summer Street 
44 Porter Road 
249 Andover Street 
116 Osgood Street 
116 Osgood Street 

5 Marion Avenue 

10 Appletree Lane 
24 Marland Street 
15 Arcadia Road 

32 Riverina Road 

33 High Street 

69 Shawsheen Road 
182 Jenkins Road 
37 Maple Avenue 
37 Maple Avenue 

17 Chandler Road 

65 Dascomb Road 

11 Cheever Circle 

12 Stratford Road 
28 Phillips Street 

21 Strawberry Hill Road 

18 Rolling Ridge Road 
44 Central Street 

57 Marilyn Road 
4 Woodland Road 
27 High Plain Road 

66 Wildwood Road 
75 Maple Avenue 

1 Stratford Road 

22 Greenwood Road 

13 Brook Street 
3 Binney Street 

85 Highland Road 
120 Tewksbury Street 
9 Brechin Terrace 
189 Highland Road 

19 Kirkland Drive 
32 Dufton Road 



80 



Lowe, Margaret B. 
Lucy, Marguerite M. 
Lundgren, Donald E. 
Lyle, George H. 
Macartney, Robert J. 
Marjerison, Thomas S. Jr. 
Marocco, Girolamo 
Marotta, George J. 
Martin, James S. 
Master, Louis 
McCarthy, Joseph A. 
McCoubrie, Robert J. 
McLay , Hugh Jr . 
McLean, John M. 
Milligan, Charles E. 
Mitchell, Robert C. 
Monan, Joseph L. 
Moody, Durwood W. 
Moriarty, John F. 
Morrisroe, Lawrence P. 
Mulick, Stella S. 
Nason, Lewis P. 
Neumark, Arthur I. 
Newill, Lester T. 
Nichols, Robert M. 
Nicoll, Celia R. 
Nigrelli, Joseph 
Noble, James G. 
Nor they, Helen L. 
O'Connor, Anna P. 
O'Connor, Charlotte A. 
O'Rourke, Charles D. 
Orr, William J. 
Ortstein, Grace B. 
Ortstein, Herbert L. 
Otis, Herbert C. 
Otis, Herbert H. 
Packard, Leslie 
Pettit, Stephen H. 
Pike, Walter N. 
Pollard, Sydney W. 
Pratt, William C.Jr. 
Puma, Antonio 
Rafton, Helen G. 
Reason, Arthur W. 
Redman, George F. 
Rhoads, William W. 
Robertson, Foster G. 
Robinson, David D. 
Robinson, Margaret G. 
Roundy, Virginia A. 
Ruhl , Malcolm J. 
Ryan, Patricia M. 



Housewife 

At Home 

Funeral Director 

Truck Driver 

Merchant 

Office Manager 

Retired 

Supervisor 

Storekeeper 

Retired 

Retired 

Head Custodian 

Carman 

Trades Helper 

Foreman 

Electrician 

Staff Assistant 

Pipefitter 

Public Relations 

Asst. Treasurer 

Housewife 

Maint. Machinist 

Sales Manager 

Asst. Superintendent 

Draftsman 

Housewife 

Cost Accountant 

Retired 

Hostess 

Tester 

Clerk 

Switchman 

Retired 

Asst. Secretary 

Manager 

Ins. Salesman 

Ins. & Real Estate 

Product Engr . 

Acct. Supervisor 

Chemical Worker 

Supervisor 

Sales Engineer 

Plant Manager 

Housewife 

Superintendent 

General Manager 

Retired 

Bldg. Superintendent 

Arch Draftsman 

Housewife 

Sales 

Proprietor 

Secretary 



6 Sutherland Street 
149 Chestnut Street 

18 Elm Street 

92 Woburn Street 
140 Argilla Road 
87 Burnham Road 
23 Corbett Street 
91 Argilla Road 
3 Washington Avenue 

19 Bellevue Road 
26 High Street 

5 Highland Wayside 
9 Marland Street 

8 Cuba Street 

21 Tewksbury Street 

12 Tewksbury Street 

13 Maple Avenue 

34 Clark Road 

22 Haverhill Street 

35 Clark Road 

26 Cutler Road 
62 River Street 
90 Elm Street 
18 Rennie Drive 
69 Gould Road 

47 High Plain Road 

27 Magnolia Avenue 
71 High Street 

52 Rocky Hill Road 
51 Magnolia Avenue 
3 Westwind Road 
61 Brookfield Road 
97 Shawsheen Road 
26 Vine Street 

26 Vine Street 
16 Hidden Road 

27 Westwind Road 
75 Shawsheen Road 

I Longwood Drive 
82 Pine Street 

5 Juniper Road 

II Arundel Street 
75 Pine Street 

9 Alden Road 

7 Walker Avenue 
234 Highland Road 

10 Washington Park Dr 
7 Canterbury Street 

11 Wild Rose Drive 
140 Chestnut Street 
11 Barrington Drive 
42 Walnut Avenue 
70B Morton Street 






Schirner, Dorothy M. 
Seero, Edward V. 
Selden, Georgeanna G. 
Sheehy, Kathleen C. 
Sherman, Frank J. Ill 
Shiebler, Mary R. 
Shorten, Mildred R. 
Silva, Dorothy K. 
Smalley, Bart F. 
Souter, Alfred F. 
Souter, John B. Jr. 
Snow, George A. 
Sutton, Thomas W. 
Sweet, Sherley M. Jr. 
Symonds, Eva M. 
Tallmadge, Gilbert F. 
Teichert, Elsie M. 
Thomson, Alexander 
Tucker, Charles H. 
Valentine, William R. 
Vannett, William B. 
Vigeant, Philip A. 
Vogt, Walter R. 
Wadman, Homer C. 
Waugh, Clarence S. 
West, Helen 
Wetterberg, Glennie P 
White, Mildred C. 
Wilkinson, Marcia A. 
Willand, Allen B. 
Wilson, Barbara D. 
Wilton, Robert B. 
Young, Flora H. 
Zaremba, Stanley A„ 



Housewife 

Sales Engineer 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Elec . Engineer 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Car Inspector 

Ins. Underwriter 

Inspector 

Sales Representative 

Working Foreman 

Training Supervisor 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Retired 

Elect. Engineer 

Receiving Clerk 

Stock Clerk 

Heating Contractor 

Supervisor 

Retired 

Housewife 

Invoice Analyst 

Manager 

Housewife 

Supervisor 

Homemaker 

Insurance Agent 

Housewife 

Utility Operator 



7 Lincoln Circle 
15 Prospect Road 
42 School Street 
241 Lowell Street 
116 Main Street 
29A Maple Avenue 
53 Abbot Street 
22 Beech Circle 
19 Hall Avenue 
1 Shipman Road 
32 Washington Avenue 
38 Linwood Street 
108 Love joy Road 

3 Stinson Road 

4 Beech Circle 
19 Johnson Road 

12 West Knoll Road 

3 Walnut Avenue 

115 Abbot Street 

56 Woburn Street 

6 Brechin Terrace 

9 Andover Street 

99 High Street 

107 High Street 

72 Poor Street 

70 Morton Street 

51 Summer Street 

66 Chandler Road 

Foster Pond Road 

92 Elm Street 

28 William Street 

Foster Pond Road 

46 Elm Street 

421 South Main Street 



82 



DIRECTORY 
OF TOWN 
OFFICIALS 



APPOINTIVE 

Administrative 

Town Manager Thomas E. Duff (To June 8, 1964) 

Richard J. Bowen (From July 20, 1964) 

Town Clerk Irving O. Piper 

Town Accountant Wendell A. Mattheson 

Collector of Taxes James P. Christie 

Town Treasurer Anna M. Greeley 

Town Counsel Fredric S. O'Brien, Esq. 

Police Chief David L. Nicoll 

Fire Chief Henry L. Hilton 

Executive Director, Andover Housing Authority James E. Manning 

Veterans' Service Agent Elmer S. Ober 

Director of Public Assistance Paul I. MacMillan 

Highway Supt Stanley Chlebowski 

Water & Sewer Supt Donald C. Bassett 

Public Works Office Manager Calvin E. Metcalf 

Town Engineer John Avery 

Sealer of Weights & Measures Newton A. Jones 

Inspector of Animals Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

Game Warden Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden George W. Campbell 

Civil Defense Director Burton B. Batcheller 

Sanitary & Plumbing Inspector Walter R. Vogt 

Alt. Sanitary & Plumbing Inspector Harold Rutter, Jr. 

Gas Inspector Walter R. Vogt 

Milk & Health Inspector John J. Broderick 

Director of Public Health Elizabeth C. Nadeau, R.N. 

Town Physician Charles A. Currier, M.D. 

Inspector of Buildings Arthur Peatman 

Asst. Inspector of Buildings Kenneth Wade 

Inspector of Wires Alex Ritchie, Jr. 

Asst. Inspector of Wires Arthur Silva 

Dog Officer Martin T. Caughey 

Supt. of Schools Edward I. Erickson 

Visual Consultant - School Dept Wm. V. Emmons, OD. 

Dental Hygienist - School Dept M. Augusta Breck 

School Physician John J. McArdle, Jr.. M.D. 

Attendance Officer William F. Tammany 

School Dentist Frank E. Himmer, D.M.D. 

School Nurses Gertrude A. Stewart, R.N. 

Ruth E. Westcott, R.N. 

Town Constables Benjamin C. Brown 

Thomas P. Eldred 

TOWN OF ANDOVER 

DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 

ELECTIVE 



Board of Selectmen 

Philip K. Allen, Chairman 
William Stewart, Vice-Chairman 



Paul W. Cronin, Secretary 
Roger W. Collins 
Robert A. Watters 



83 



Trustees - Punchard Free School 

Arthur W. Cole 

Fred W. Doyle 

Edmond E. Hammond 

C. Carleton Kimball 

Harry Sellars 
*The Rev. Frederick B. Noss 
*The Rev. J. Edison Pike 
*The Rev. Bruce Van Blair 
*Members automatically by virtue of will of 
Town Moderator 
Charles G. Hatch 
School Committee 
John S. Sullivan, Chairman 

Vincent P. Davey 

William A. Doherty 

Barbara G. Moody 

Robert E. Sherman 

Trustees - Cornell Fund 

Frederick E. Cheever 

Arthur W. Cole 

Irving J. Whitcomb 

Andover Housing Authority 

David MacDonald, Jr., Chairman 

Harold E. Coleman, Vice-Chairman* 

Winston A. Blake 

Thomas P. Eldred 

Thomas R. Wallace, Treasurer 

* Appointed by State Housing Authority 

Regional Vocational School District Committee 

Fred S. Tarbox 

Boards, Committees and Commissions 

Finance Committee 

Kenneth E. Holmes, Chairman 

Stephen H. Pettit, Secretary 

Richard I. Anderson 

Thomas S. Marjerison, Jr. 
Robert M. Henderson 
Glenn W. Inman 
Edward A. Romeo 
Zoning Board of Appeals 
Alfred W. Fuller, Chairman 
Edmond E. Hammond, Secretary 



Harris Sanfilippo 
Associate Members: 
Robert S. Zollner 
Sherley M. Sweet, 



Jr. 



Augustine P. Sheehy 

Planning Board of Appeals 

Joseph A. McCarthy 

Frank L. Brigham 

Board of Assessors 

Archibald D. Maclaren, Jr., Chairman 

Selby Groff - Deceased Nov. 1964 

William H. Russell 

Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

Arthur Reynolds, Chairman 

Andrew A. Caffrey 

Leo F. Daley, Treasurer 

Elinore L. Washburn 

Edward I. Erickson 

Daniel Frishman 

Cornelia H. Fitts 



Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 

Frederick E. Cheever, Chairman 

Albert E. Curtis, Secretary 

Malcolm E. Lundgren 

Irving J. Whitcomb 

Edward P. Hall 

Board of Registrars 

W'alter F. MacDonald 

Harry Sellars 

Eugene A. Zalla 

Board of Health- 

Robert A. Walsh, Chairman 

Dr. John Wholey, M.D. 

Fay H. Elliott 

Board of Public Welfare 

Thayer S. Warshaw, Chairman 

Sara B. Bolton 

George Hill 

Planning Board 

Harold T. King, Chairman 
'^Virginia H. Hammond, Board Secretary 

John N. Cole, II 

James H. Eaton, III 

James Trenholm 
*Resigned Dec. 1964 
Industrial Development Commission 
Charles DeBell, Chairman 
Richard M. Sullivan 
Wolf Berthold 
Horace M. Poynter, Jr. 
Harold Haller - Resigned Oct. 1964 
John R. McLeod 
David Duncan, Jr. 
Robert Phinney 
Glen Grubbs 

Conservation Commission 
Heinrich Rohrbach, Chairman 
Albert R. Retelle, Secretary 
Christopher Muller 
Mrs. Waters Kellogg 
Frederic A. Stott 
Transportation Committee 
Harold King 
James A. McEvoy 
Frederick Flather, Jr. 
Francis J. Trombly 
Richard J. Bowen 
Board of Retirement 
David L. Nicoll, Chairman 
Edmond E. Hammond 
Wendell A. Mattheson 
Recreation Advisory Committee 
Donald Sagaser, Chairman 
James D. Piatt 
Mrs. R. Milton Cole 
Mrs. Charles Leigh 
Dan B. Armstrong 
James J. O'Reilly 
Earl E. Simon 

Insurance Advisory Committee 
James D. Doherty 
George E. Haselton 
Douglas N. Howe 
Richard W. Lally 



84 






Eugene A, Bernardin, Jr. 
Patriotic Holiday Committee 
Joseph L. Monan (V.F.W.) 
Benjamin Brown (American Legion) 
Elmer S. Ober, Vets. Service Agent 
John Lynch (D.A.V.) 
Committee to Study Town By-Laws 
Robert S. Zollner 
Land Acquisition Committee 
Joseph F. Adams, Chairman 
Richard Brooks 
New Materials Committee 
James D. Hamilton 
Arthur Peatman 
Kenneth Wade 

Special Commission for Investigation and Study Rela- 
tive to Creation of a Merrimack River Valley Pollution 
Abatement District 

Joseph A. McCarthy - Representative from Andover 
Central Merrimack Valley Planning District 
John N. Cole 

Long Range Capital Expenditure Committee 
Harry Axelrod 
Robert G. McAnern 
Richard Moody 
Herbert L. Ortstein 
Frederick P. Worthen 
Supt. of Schools, Edward I. Erickson 
Town Manager, Richard J. Bowen 
Senior High School Building Committee 
Benjamin O. Chase 
Mrs. Dudley Fitts, Secretary 
C. Lincoln Giles 
Frederick A. Higgins 
Robert Mclntyre, Chairman 
Wm. E. Moriarty 
Walter N. Webster 

Committee to Make Preliminary Investigation of Feas- 
ibility of Automating Town's Accounting and Clerical 
Operations: 

Jack Berberian - School Dept. 
Richard J. Bowen - Town Manager 
Robert J. Jordan 
Winthrop Newcomb 
E. Stephen Prendergast 
Harold Coleman 
Planning Advisory Committee 

(To assist Central Merrimack Valley Planning District) 
Paul Herbert - Resigned Dec. 1964 
James G. Poor 

Timothy J. Scanlon - Appointed Dec. 1964 
Henry M. Wolfson 
Towle Fund Trust 
Mrs. Louis Anderson 
Robert M. Henderson 
George F. James 
School Building Committee 
(Sanborn School) 
Warren Lewis, Chairman 
Benjamin O. Chase, Secretary 
William R. Hill 
C. Lincoln Giles 
Arthur Peatman 
Ernest N. Hall 



William A. Doherty, Ex Officio 
Edward I. Erickson, Ex Officio 
Town Manager, Ex Officio 




Resigned Dec. 1, 1964 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Population 1960 Census - 17,134 

Registered Voters 1964 - 10,576 

POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS INCLUDING ANDOVER 

SENATORS 

Leverett Saltonstall 

Dover 

Edward M. Kennedy 

Boston 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

F. Bradford Morse, 466 Beacon Street, Lowell 

FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 
Thomas J. Lane, 92 Abbott Street, Lawrence 

FOURTH ESSEX SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

James P. Rurak, 34 Margin Street, Haverhill 

TWELFTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 

William Longworth, 25 Stevens Street, Methuen 

Albert P. Pettoruto, 41 Bartlet Street, Andover 
Arthur Williams, 149 Haverhill Street, Andover 
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 
C. F. Nelson Pratt 
Daniel J. Burke 
Edward H. Cahill 
SELECTIVE SERVICE BOARD 
Joseph A. Horan, Chairman 
Thomas E. Cargill, Sr., Secretary 
Martin J. Lawlor, Jr. 
Thomas W. Fallon 
James Deyermond 
Salvatore Basile, Govt. Appeal Agent 
200 Chandler Road, Andover 
Boxford Village, Boxford 
39 Highland View Ave., No. Andover 
58 Maple Avenue, Andover 
64 Andover Street, Andover 
15 Chandler Road, Andover 



85 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1964 



Cash in Banks 

Real Estate Mortgages 

Bonds at Book Value 

Total 



Cash in Banks 



Balance on hand- 
January 1, 1964 

Interest and Dividends 
Received 



Less Expenditures for 1964 

Balance on hand- 
December 31,1964 



PRINCIPAL FUND 

$29,604.72 

7,445.10 

39,950.18 



$77,000.00 

RESERVE FUND 



January 1, 1964 Balance 

$10,515.22 



Interest Received 

$451.61 



INCOME ACCOUNT 

$ 1,406.16 

2,915.49 Safe Deposit Box 

Treasurer's Bond 

$ 4,321.65 Salary-Clerk and Treasurer 

Supplies and Equipment 
1,317.41 for High School Depts. 

$ 3,004.24 Total 



$30,588.64 

6,461.18 

39,950.18 

$77,000.00 



December 31, 1964 Balance 

$10,966.83 



Payments made during year 



11.00 

25.00 

250.00 

1,031.41 



$ 1,317.41 



SPECIAL FUNDS 



Balance- January 1 , 1964 


Receipts 


Total 


Scholarship and 
Prize Awards 


Balance- 
Dec. 31, 1964 


Goldsmith Fund 


$ 351.36 


$14.18 


$ 365.54 


$10.00 


$ 355.54 


Draper Fund 


1,518.41 


59.72 


1,578.13 


80.00 


1,498.13 


J. W. Barnard Fund 


34.61 


40.98 


75.59 


40.00 


35.59 


Chapin Fund 


2,316.97 


91.78 


2,408.75 


90.00 


2,318.75 


H. W. & M. P. Barnard Fund 


1,020.90 


41.22 


1,062.12 




1,062.12 


Eliz. T. Gutterson Fund 


1,023.38 


40.52 


1,063.90 


40.00 


1,023.90 


M. E. Gutterson Fund 


336.47 


13.38 


349.85 


10.00 


339.85 


Alice M. Bell Fund 


1,023.08 


40.52 


1,063.60 


40.00 


1,023.60 



SUMMARY OF COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT 



1964 



Farm Animal Excise 

Poll 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Miscellaneous: 

Sewer Betterments 

Apportioned Sewer Paid in Advance 

Sewer-Deferred Lien 

Weter Betterments 

Unapportioned Water 

Apportioned Water Paid in Advance 

Water Liens 

Water Service 

Committed Interest 

Interest on Delinquent Taxes 



$ 



360.34 

151,224.23 

3,063,069.69 

434,919,24 



5,324.71 
5,247.50 

592.79 
1,242.34 
6,527.91 
2,405.78 
8,863.49 

469.95 

2,816.63 

1,129.53 

$3,684,194.13 



Previous 
Years 

54.50 


Totals 

Collected 

$ 414.84 


274.00 


274.00 


2,868.85 
101,030.17 
106,185.18 


154.093.08 98% 
3,164,099.86 96.3% 
541,104.42 


424.46 


5,7,49.17 

5,247.50 

592.79 


225.47 

621.75 
23.00 


1,467.81 
6,527.91 
2,405.78 
9,485.24 
492.95 


324.83 
4,664.29 
$ 216,696.50 


3,141.46 
5,793.82 
$3,900,890.63 



86 




30 




Guy J. Rizzotto 

Commissioner 
Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 



£6 ^Wa&en/ t/wee&, <^e>Stmt/ 



MAIL ADDRESS; 
P. O. BOX 2017 
BOSTON 6, MASS. 



February 26, 196£ 



Board of Selectmen 
Andover 

Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

This is to certify that the books and accounts of 
the town of Andover were audited by the Bureau of Accounts, 
Department of Corporations and Taxation, as of December 31> 
19 61+, at which time they were found to be correct with all 
funds properly accounted for. 

A detailed report of the audit will be forwarded 
as soon as possible. 

The detailed audit report will contain recommend- 
ations that the tax collector obtain a prompt settlement of 
the delinquent tax and excise accounts. 



Very truly yours, 




Assistant Chief of Bureau 




WS :mdg 
cctTown Clerk 




87 



INDEX 



ACCOUNTANT 

(1964 Financial Statements) „ . . 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

ANIMAL INSPECTION 

ASSESSORS 

AUDITOR'S REPORT . 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT . . . 
DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS . . 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 

ENGINEERING 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

HEALTH 

HIGHWAYS 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 



JURY LIST 

(How Selected) 78 



LANDFILL 

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 
LIBRARY 





PARKS 


. . 13 


28 








PLANNING BOARD 


. . 8 


11 








POLICE DEPARTMENT 


. . 9 


17 








PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL . . . . 


. . 86 


7 








RECREATION 


. . 22 


88 








RETIREMENT 


. . 27 


5 








REVIEW OF THE YEAR 


. . 2 


12 








SCHOOLS 


. . 18 


11 








SELECTMEN 


. . 5 


6 








SEWERS 


. . 14 


83 








SPRING GROVE CEMETERY . . . 


. . 25 


11 








STREET LIGHTING 


. . 14 


14 








TAX COLLECTOR 


. . 7 


6 








TOWLE TRUST FUND 


. . 27 


11 








TOWN CLERK 


. . 7 


16 








TOWN MANAGER 


. . 6 


13 


TOWN MEETING MINUTES 




25 


(How To Become a Voter) . . 


. . 47 




TOWN TREASURER 


. . 8 


9 








TREES 


. . 13 


78 


VETERAN'S SERVICES 


18 


15 


WATER 


. . 24 


1 


WEIGHTS and MEASURES .... 


11 


20 




. . 17 



88 




WHERE THE MONEY WENT 

1 GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

2 PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

3 HEALTH AND SANITATION 

4 HIGHWAYS 

5 CHARITIES AND VETERANS SERVICES 

6 SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES 

7 RECREATION AND UNCLASSIFIED 

8 ENTERPRISE AND CEMETERIES 

9 DEBT SERVICE 

10 PAYMENTS TO STATE AND COUNTY 

11 ALL OTHER 



$ 160,997.10 
562,215.92 
55,079.26 
331,206.97 
157,200.40 

2,193,216.73 
269,866.41 
191,069.08 
449,385.40 
143,748.00 
67,258.21 



10 




n 




ECHAL 



wwu ob AiAcloi/e/y AvmLcSlZep 



l%5 




Office Of The Town Manager 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 
March 1, 1966 



'''JorniMrt*'* 



To the Stockholders of 
Town of Andover, Inc. 



THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGE... Have we met it; can we meet it; 
but perhaps most important of all, do we want to meet it 
successfully? 

Our annual report cover suggests and hopefully with only the 
slightest bit of irreverence and license, a corporate symbol 
which indicates our ability to answer these questions with a 
loud and resounding "Yes". Our "20th Century Pilgrim" 
endeavors to describe us as members of a corporation which 
takes great pride in its three-hundred year heritage and at 
the same time a firm which is fully aware of the need for 
adjusting its thinking, its physical well-being, its every- 
day activity to meet the ever-increasing demands and challen- 
ges of our ever-changing times. 

The words, figures and pictures which are found in this report 
by the officials and employees of the Town of Andover, Inc. 
represent an accounting by them of their stewardship of your 
affairs during the past year. 

Their reports show it to have been a busy year; a year of 
change; a year of accomplishment; and yes, a year of some 
failures . 

In the final analysis, however, the true measure of the value 
of 1965 corporate affairs will be your judgment of them as 
you examine this document. Your dividends, of necessity, 
must be in such intangible terms as satisfaction, contentment, 
trust, confidence and so many others. 

It is our hope that after having reviewed our production in 
1965 that you will take the time to give us your comments, 
suggestions and criticisms. Above all else, however, we in- 
vite you to join with us once again and with enthusiasm in 
meeting the exciting problems of the year ahead confident that 
together we can meet them with success . 



Respectfully submitted 




&$■& 



-T*ft*\J 



Richard J. Bowen 
Town Manager 



RJB:rh 



• Town of Andover 1966 



THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGE 

Annual Report of the Town of Andover for 
the 1965 Fiscal Year 

Prepared by 

the Town Manager as directed by the Board of Selectmen 

Pursuant to the Provisions of Chapter 40, Section 49 of the General Laws 

of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL Inside Front Cover 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 2 

THE YEAR AHEAD 4 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 5 

STAFF AGENCIES 8 

PUBLIC SAFETY 15 

PUBLIC WORKS 21 

SANITATION AND WASTE DISPOSAL 23 

PUBLIC HEALTH 24 

PUBLIC WELFARE 26 

VETERAN'S SERVICES 26 

SCHOOLS 28 

LIBRARY 29 

RECREATION -... 32 

WATER 35 

UNCLASSIFIED 39 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 41 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES 63 

JURY LIST 86 

DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 90 

INDEX 92 

HOW WELL DID YOU READ YOUR TOWN REPORT? Inside Back Cover 



CREDITS 





Photographs 


■ 

- Andover Townsman 


:;j; ,, 




Albert Cole 

Lawrence Eagle-Tribune 

Richard Graber 




Art Work 


GRAPHICS 




Printing 


Town Printing 



© Town of Andover, 1966 



REVIEW 




LAST YEAR TOWN MEETING 

* APPROPRIATED $6,745,390.50 for services 
and projects for 1965. 

* APPROVED the installation of a water line on 
Dascomb Road to service the new Allied 
Chemical facility. 

* APPROVED $340,000 for an addition to and 
alteration of the Memorial Hall Library; 
$125,000 for construction of a new Public 
Works garage; $150,000 for construction of a 
new police station ; and $125,000 for the plan- 
ning and construction of a new fire station in 
West Andover. 

* ACCEPTED the recommendation of the Board 
of Selectmen and Finance Committee to con- 
struct a new Town Hall and appropriated the 
sum of $550,000. 

* AUTHORIZED the use of $400,000 in Free 
Cash in order to reduce the 1965 Tax Rate. 

* INSTRUCTED the Board of Selectmen to file 
an application with the United States Housing 
and Home Finance Agency for an interest-free 
loan to plan the construction of an enclosed 
reservoir. 

* OVERWHELMINGLY APPROVED a resolu- 
tion favoring the presentation of an amendment 
to the State constitution which would grant 
home rule to Massachusetts municipalities. 

LAST YEAR THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN: 

* HELD 24 regular and 3 special meetings. 

* CONDUCTED 16 gravel removal hearings. 

* ESTABLISHED and participated in the first 
annual Founder's Day celebration on May 6, 
1965. 

* AUTHORIZED the establishment of a system 
employee awards to be given to Town employees 
for service to the Town of Andover. 



* INITIATED AND COMPLETED successful 
steps which resulted in the improvement of the 
Town's fire insurance rating. 

* PARTICIPATED in discussions with the City 
of Lawrence and the Towns of North Andover 
and Methuen on the abatement of pollution in 
the Merrimack River. 

* SPONSORED in the 1965 Annual Town Meet- 
ing the Capital Expenditure proposals sub- 
sequently approved by the voters. 

* CALLED two Special Town Meetings during 
the year, the most significant one having dealt 
with approval of the Fish Brook water project. 

* AUTHORIZED after close consultation with 
and earmarking of funds by the Finance Com- 
mittee geological surveys to determine the 
availability of additional ground water supply. 

* ADOPTED new regulations which forbid the 
opening of any Town street within two years 
of its having been improved. 

* APPOINTED itself as the Town Rationing 
Board which would function in the event of a 
disaster. 

* SUPPORTED the application of the City of 
Haverhill for the soon-to-be-selected site of a 
multi-million dollar atomic accelerator. 

* APPROVED the creation of a Community Ac- 
tion Council to become elegible for programs 
under the Federal Anti-Poverty Program. 

* PRESSED FOR property tax relief by the 
Great and General Court by letters to the 
Town's elected state representatives. 

* ACCEPTED on behalf of the Town a Federal 
Advanced Public Works Planning Loan of 
$28,209 paid for the preparation of plans and 
specifications for the Bancroft Reservoir pro- 
ject. 

* AUTHORIZED the Town Manager to execute 
a new three-year garbage collection contract. 



* APPLIED FOR an interest-free Federal loan of 
$58,000 for the planning of a new twenty-four 
classroom elementary school in South Andover. 



LAST YEAR TOWN DEPARTMENTS 
REPORT: 

* PREPARATION AND IMPLEMENTATION 
of new purchasing procedures including a de- 
tailed manual of purchasing requirements. 

* ADOPTION of new and more comprehensive 
personnel rules and regulations for Town em- 
ployees. 

* RECEIPT OF First Prize in the 1964 Annual 
Report Contest sponsored by the Massachusetts 
Selectmen's Association. 

* REGISTRATION of a total of 10,050 voters as 
of July 1. 

* BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES total- 
ing 302, 179 and 178 respectively. 

* PROPERTY ASSESSMENT for tax purposes 
of $107,328,200. 

* TWENTY-FIVE court appearance on behalf of 
the Town by Town Counsel. 

* COMPLETION by consultants of a revision of 
the Town's Comprehensive Plan paid for in part 
with the Federal "701" grant. 

* SUBMISSION of 14 subdivisions containing 
409 house lots of which 11 were approved con- 
taining 151 such lots. 

* PLANTING of 115 shade and ornamental trees ; 
removal because of dutch elm disease of 76 
trees. 

* ISSUANCE of 572 building permits; 536 
electrical permits. 

* INSTALLATION of an electronic data pro- 
cessing system in the Accounting Department. 

* INSPECTION by the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures of 6,418 pre-packaged items and 173 
weighing devices. 

* PUBLIC ASSISTANCE CASE LOAD averag- 
ing 226 persons each month. 

* WELFARE EXPENSES of $249,147.90. 



ESTABLISHMENT by the School Committee 
of the position of Assistant Superintendent in 
charge of elementary education in place of the 
Curriculum Coordinator who resigned. 

INAUGURATION of an educational enrich- 
ment program for 5th and 6th graders in the 
public school system. 

TAX COLLECTIONS totaling $4,252,743.26. 

TOWN POPULATION as determined by the 
State Census of 20, 551. 

: INSTALLATION of 65 new street lights. 

e REACTIVATION of the Town Conservation 
Commission. 

FIRE LOSSES of an estimated $155,800 with 
1,916 service calls made by the Andover Fire 
Department. 

DELIVERY of a new 1,000 gallon-per-minute 
Class A diesel-powered fire pumper. 

MORE THAN 3,000 man-hours of volunteers 
time by Civil Defense personnel. 

POLICE COMPLAINTS totaling 3,143; 274 
arrests; 389 motor vehicle accidents; 2 MV 
fatalities. 

START OF CONTRUCTION on the Memorial 
Hall Library Addition, Public Works Garage; 
Senior High School and the Fish Brook Water 
Project. 

HAGGETT'S POND dropping to 76.5 inches 
below full. 

LOCATION of a warehouse, laboratory and 
office by Allied Chemical Co. 

MORE THAN 850 million gallons of water 
pumped. 

PARKING METER revenue of $6,357.77. 

COMPLETION AND DEDICATION of the 
Sanborn Elementary School on Lovejoy Road. 

ESTABLISHMENT of a new and higher sched- 
ule of fees for Spring Grove Cemetery facilities. 

FIFTY MILES of Town streets treated with 
asphalt; construction of more than 200 feet of 
drainage. 



* ASSISTANCE to 30 permanent and 81 vet- 
eran's cases. 



LIBRARY book collection of 50,443 volumes 
and 9,317 borrowers. 



COMPLETION of the accelerated sewer project 
which resulted in the construction of approxim- 
ately 13 miles in sewer mains. 



ACCOMMODATION at the Andover Recrea- 
tion Park Lodge of more than 50 groups of 
people. 



PLANS 




CONTINUED exploration for additional 
ground water supplies. 

COMPLETION OF the construction of the 
Public Works Garage and Memorial Hall 
Library Addition. 

INITIATION OF construction of West Andover 
Fire Station, Town Hall and Police Station. 

PROPERTY value equalization program upon 
approval of 1966 Annual Town Meeting. 

REVISION of building permit fees subject to 
Town Meeting approval and increase in water 
rates. 

PREPARATION of plans and specifications for 
new South Andover elementary school. 

CONTINUATION of construction of new senior 
high school. 

ACQUISITION of at least two school sites. 

FULL IMPLEMENTATION of electronic data 
processing program. 

ESTABLISHMENT of a Local Council on the 
Aging and a Local Council on Youth. 

DEVELOPMENT of plans for the abatement 
of polluting the Merrimack River with Town 
sewerage. 

INAUGURATION of a comprehensive equip- 
ment maintenance program including an equip- 
ment pool in order to realize full use of all 
Town-owned equipment. 

LAND ACQUISITION under a State matching 
program for conservation purposes. 



* REVITALIZATION of Town parking meter 
program including more effective enforcement 
and meter maintenance. 

* MORE AGGRESSIVE industrial development 
programs. 

* FULL USE of all Federal grant-in-aid pro- 
grams for projects approved by the Town Meet- 
ing. 

* TAX RELIEF by the Great and General Court. 

* COMPLETION of the Fish Brook Water Pro- 
ject with an estimated safe daily yield of 
1,000,000 gallons of water to be pumped into 
Haggetts Pond. 

* A FULLY ACTIVE Community Action Council 
both locally and on a regional basis. 

* BANCROFT RESERVOIR plans completed. 

* ANOTHER successful Founder's Day. 



These spaces reserved 
for your plans . . . 



GENERAL 
GOVERNMENT 



Board of Selectmen 



Personnel 


Part-time 5 
Plus Secretary 




Expenditures 


$3,589.00 




Monthly Cost Per Person 


IVa^ 


HB 



It would indeed be an understatement to sug- 
gest that the year was a busy and eventful one for 
the Board. Town business required that the Board 
of Selectmen in 1965 meet formally at 24 regular 
and 3 special sessions. As the Town's Licensing 
Authority, the Board granted the usual alcholic 
beverages licenses and because of the increase in 
population shown in the 1965 State Census, 
granted an additional license. The Board also 
held one disciplinary hearing as the result of a 
complaint by the State Alcholic Beverages Con- 
trol Commission of the sale of liquor to a minor 
which resulted in the licensee having his license 
suspended for three davs. 

The Board also held 16 hearings in connection 
with requests for permits to remove gravel of 
which 14 were granted and 2 denied. 

In some respects, these constituted the rou- 
tine business of the Board of Selectmen. Perhaps 
one of the more far reaching problems faced and 
solved successfully in 1965 was that relating to 
the Town's Fire Insurance Rating. In September 
of 1964, it appeared that the Town was faced with 
a prohibitively expensive program of fire fighting 
defense improvements which, if left undone, 
would have resulted in the Town's fire insurance 
rating being dropped from B-5 to C-5. On first 
glance, it seemed that the expense far outweighed 
the benefits if this new schedule was to be avoid- 
ed. The Board of Selectmen, however, took the 
position that its first responsibility was to insure 
the safety of the Town, its residents and property 
and, second, to be concerned about a perhaps 
somewhat arbitrary insurance rating which would 
cause a slight increase in home fire insurance 
costs. 

A careful review and analysis of the rating 
survey report was undertaken and a program de- 
veloped which met many of the major recommen- 
dations and which resulted in the elimination of 
a sufficient number of penalty points so as to at 
least retain our previous rating. Most of these 
items were taken care of without substantial 




dollar outlays or simply through doing things in 
a slightly different order of priority. They all, 
nevertheless, required the positive application of 
the Board, Town departments and the Town 
Meeting to the task of doing what needed to be 
done. Homeowners will not be penalized and spe- 
cifically rated properties - business and industry - 
will receive reduced rates. Where a year ago the 
Town was faced with a penalty rating because of 
deficiencies in our fire fighting defenses, the 
Town can boast today of a timely and well- 
earned improvement from B-5 to B-4. 

Another and heartwarming highlight of 
1965 was the celebration of Founder's Day on May 
6th. The Board of Selectmen, with the Andover 
Chamber of Commerce, honored 141 town employ- 
ees at a dinner attended by more than 300 people. 
Jeweled pins were given to employees who had 
been with the Twon ten or more years. Total ser- 
vice of these dedicated public servants was in 
excess of 2,400 years. The "Employee of the 
Year," Walter Baker, was especially honored. The 
Chamber of Commerce gave to the Town a plaque 
on which will be engraved the names of the respec- 
tive "Employee of the Year". 

In view of the untimely passing of William 
W. Rhoads who was the real spark plug in this 
first annual Founder's Day, the Board of Select- 
men have established the "William W. Rhoads 
Memorial Award" which will be given to the 
"Town Employee of the Year" annually. It is a 
fitting though perhaps very humble tribute to a 
very energetic and service-conscious man. 

During the year, the Board was called upon 
by the State Department of Health to involve it- 
self in discussions with the City of Lawrence and 
the Towns of Methuen and North Andover on the 
matter of the abatement of pollution of the Merri- 
mack River. Each of these municipalities, along 
with Andover, uses the river as the dumping 
ground for sewerage. A sub-committee was ap- 
pointed consisting of the Town Manager and Sel- 
ectman Robert A. Watters to meet with represen- 
tatives of these other communities to consider the 
possibility of a regional abatement program. In- 
itial estimates indicate that the total cost of such 
a project would exceed Twenty Million Dollars 
($20,000,000.) with the Town of Andover's share 
of capital costs approximately Two Million 
($2,000,000.) The Town's annual obligation for 



operating expenses would approximate $80,000.00 
The Board recognizes this matter of pollution 
to be a serious one and one which demands the full 
force of energy and imagination of the Town in 
arriving at a satisfactory solution. It is not a prob- 
lem, however, which can be solved in haste. It is 
expected that consultations with the Town's 
neighbors will continue for some months and, 
upon their completion, a full report will be ren- 
dered to the Town for such action as may be ap- 
propriate. 

Two significant projects were sponsored by 
the Board in order to alleviate the serious water 
shortage brought to a peak in 1965. The Board 
called a Special Town Meeting to consider and 
subsequently approve the so-called Fish Brook 
project. In addition and in consultation with the 
Finance Committee, funds were allocated for 
geographical surveys in the hope of finding addi- 
tional and suitable ground water supply. Both of 
these projects are in progress and should be 
completed by Spring of 1966. With any mea- 
sure of success, they promise to help solve our 
water problems both immediately and in the 
future. 

The Board also in 1965 conducted a hearing 
under the so-called Hatch Act on the application 
of a subdivider to fill a portion of the Fish Brook 
flood plain area. In the knowledge that such work 
could affect adversely a major source of water 
for the Town, the Board voted to disapprove the 
application. 

In an effort to avoid the costly problems 
from utility companies opening recently improved 
town streets, the Board also adopted regulations 
which would prevent street openings for a period 
of two years after the improvement of a given 
town roadway. 

Perhaps one of the most perplexing problems 
faced by the Board of Selectmen during the past 
year was the selection of a site for the construc- 
tion of the Town Hall approved at the 1965 an- 
nual Town Meeting. The Board is, was and re- 
mains acutely conscious of its critical responsi- 
bility in deciding on the location of this impor- 
tant Town facility. It is safe to say that there is 
no one site in the Town which does not raise 
problems of one sort or another and it is equally 
safe to conclude that all points of view will not be 
satisfied. However, with the selection of an ar- 
chitect, it appears quite likely that a firm deci- 
sion will be made by the Selectmen in order that 
work may go forward on this much needed im- 
provement during 1966. 

Other significant actions of the Board dur- 




ing the past year included the perambulation of 
the bounds of the Town with officials from Law- 
rence, Methuen, North Andover, Tewksbury and 
Wilmington; the establishment of a Rationing 
Board to function in the event of a local or na- 
tional emergency; the supporting of the applica- 
tion of the City of Haverhill for an atomic accel- 
erator facility to be established by the United 
States Atomic Energy Commission; approval of 
the creation of a Community Action Council in or- 
der to take advantage of the Federal Anti-Poverty 
Program ; and a continuous effort at keeping the 
Town's State Representatives appraised of the 
need by Andover and other Massachusetts mun- 
icipalities for property tax relief. 

Two additional significant actions were taken 
by the Board which involved the meeting 
of some of the long range requirements of the 
Town. The Board approved the filing of an ap- 
plication with the United States Housing and 
Home Finance Agency for an interest free loan 
of $58,000.00 in order to plan the construction of 
a 24-classroom elementary school in South An- 
dover. The Board also accepted a Federal loan un- 
der the same program of $28,209.00 which is 
being used for the preparation of engineering 
plans to construct an enclosed reservoir which 
would replace the present open Bancroft Reser- 
voir. 

The Board also accepted nine town streets 
which were previously approved by the annual 
Town Meeting. 

Of particular significance to the Town was 
the sponsoring by the Board of Selectmen of 
Annual town Meeting warrant articles for the 
Town Hall, Police Station, West Andover Fire 
Station, Memorial Hall Library Addition and 
Town Garage construction projects. Their status 
is described more fully in the Municipal Buildings 
report but each has proceeded in an orderly, rea- 
soned manner and will represent upon their com- 
pletion, community assets in which all Town 
citizens will be able to take considerable pride. 

The Board also received bids on a new 
three-year garbage collection service. It was 
pleased with the bid which was received despite 
the price going up from $25,000 to $30,000 per 
year. In view of the general increase of other 
services, this is a very favorable contract. This 
service is administered by the Town Manager 
through the Board of Health, to which any in- 
quires or complaints should be made. 

Thus, the year behind gives some indication 
of what lies ahead . . . another very busy and 
productive year. 




Walter Baker, Employee-of-the-year. 



Board of Selectmen 1965, Roger W. Collins, Robert A. Waters, Philip 
K. Allen, Chairman, William Stewart, Vice-Chairman, Paul W. Cronin, 
Secretary. 



Town Manager 



Personnel 


Full-time 2 




Part-time 1 


Expenditures 


$25,61 1 .00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


10^ 



In many respects, the reports of the several 
operating departments of the Town of Andover 
represent an accounting by the Town Manager of 
his administration of Town affairs. Nevertheless, 
1965 witnessed several achievements and many 
changes which were distinctly the responsibility 
of the Town's chief administrative officer. 

Purchasing procedures during the past year 
were strengthened primarily through the prepara- 
tion and distribution to Town agencies of a pur- 
chasing manual. This comprehensive compilation 
is designed to set down firmly and explicitly, the 
manner in which purchases are to be effected. In 
addition, formal competitive bidding was carried 
out on a more extensive scale than ever in the past. 
There is little doubt that the public interest has 
been served by these changes including substantial 
dollar savings to the Town's taxpayers. It is quite 
evident that the expenditure balances remaining 
in many operating accounts at the end of 1965 can 
be attributed to the purchasing practices which 
were implemented. 

Personnel practices also received a much- 
needed boost during the past year. A compre- 
hensive and detailed set of personnel rules and 
regulations were put into effect in June. These 
rules establish firmly the principle of merit in the 
selection, promotion, compensation and disciplin- 
ing of Town employees. Little is left to chance and 
every one knows the rules of the game. With 
funds provided by the 1965 Annual Town Meet- 
ing, a new and considerably more flexible pay plan 
was adopted by the Town Manager. It, too, em- 
bodies the merit concept and guarantees to all 
Town employees pay increases within the limits 
of Town appropriations only upon at least satis- 
factory work performances. The new plan also 
corrected many inequities in pay policies which 
had accumulated over the past. 

In-service training of Town employees was 
encouraged in 1965. Three employees, Town Trea- 
surer, Planning Aide and the Water and Sewer 
Superintendent, attended classes in finance, plan- 
ning and public works administration respectively 
at Boston College. Tuition was paid by the Town 
but attendance was on their own time and trans- 
portation at their own expense. Every effort will 
be made in the year ahead to encourage similar 
training experiences for other employees or 
officials. 

Personnel files were also established in 1965. 
For the first time, a central and in time, compre- 
hensive record of the backgrounds and perform- 
ances of each employee will be put together. 

Budgeting improvements also occurred in the 
preparation of the 1965 Annual Budget. Aside 



from a change in its format, the budget was a 
complete document showing all possible expenses 
and revenues. As little as possible was left to 
imagination or guesswork with written justifi- 
cation of all major expenditure programs con- 
tained in the budget. It was also an executive 
bulget for which the Town Manager was respons- 
ible in presenting it to the Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee and ultimately, the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Involvement in the exciting and new world 
of data processing represented one of the very 
real and satisfying experiences of the year. Ex- 
tensive research and competitive bidding resulted 
in the rental of an NCR 500 computer installation 
for use in the keeping of all Town financial records 
and transactions. The Town Accountant and an- 
other well-qualified member of the Town staff, 
Mrs. Barbara Botsch were trained by the con- 
tractor in the operation and uses of the equipment. 
It was operational on January 1, 1966 for payroll 
purposes but will ultimately expand to all appro- 
priation and revenue accounting, water billing, 
tax billing and the preparation of varied up-to- 
date financial and administrative reports. This 
installation promises to' be of almost priceless 
value in permitting the Town administration to 
respond to the demands being made upon it with- 
out correspondingly disproportionate increases 
in expenses. 

In addition to mechanical improvements as 
reflected in electronic data processing, the Town 
Manager with the Town Accountant developed a 
new, more flexible and more meaningful system 
of appropriation accounts. 

The "ANDOVER NEWS" was another change 
in 1965. This publication prepared and printed 
entirely by Town personnel was issued in August 
to keep Town citizens informed of important 
issues which they and their officials and employees 
are facing. The first issue dealt with the drought 
and the Fish Brook project which was subsequent- 
ly approved at a special town meeting. It is in- 
tended that other issues will be prepared as con- 
ditions and issues demand its publication and 
distribution. 

"Clean-Up" Week was also a first last year 
and will be continued in future years. Christmas 
tree pick-up was also instituted. These programs 
of service were designed to help property owners 
in the never-ending job of maintaining their pro- 
perties. 

Yellow (though we prefer to describe it as 
"gold") became a more prevelant color during the 
year. Both to identify Town equipment clearly and 
for safety purposes, a standard color for Town 
public works equipment was adopted. By the end 
of 1966, this important job will be completed. 
Town police cruisers also changed their appear- 
ances and complimented the gold with a metallic 
blue. Punchard School Alumni, especially, have 
noted the method in these changes. 



The Town Report for 1964 was selected by 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association as the 
First Prize report in Commonwealth municipali- 
ties of the same population class. The report be- 
came sufficiently popular during the year that the 
Town's supply was exhausted. 

New street opening regulations were adopted 
during the year. They are intended to protect the 
public against unsatisfactory repair of street ex- 
cavations by private contractors in terms of both 
safety and expense. 

A central service operation was established 
during the year. Certain services common to the 



several departments were provided in a central 
location. These included photocopying, duplicating 
and postage. It is expected that this service will 
be expanded to include a central storeroom in 
which the more common office supplies will be kept 
and made available upon requisition by a using 
department. This service has proven its value 
and should lead to continued dollars savings to the 
Town. 

These represent some of the more significant 
tasks completed in 1965 and suggest what lies 
ahead in their continued application as well as 
new and more challenging jobs. 



AGENCIES 



Town Accountant 



Personnel 


Full-time 2 




Part-time 1 


Expenditures 


$17,535.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


7^ 



The year 1965 has seen the advent of an 
electronic data processing system in the Account- 
ing Department. This installation will enable the 
Town to do electronically, with infinitely greater 
speed what it has been doing mechanically with 
increasing difficulty as a consequence of a grow- 
ing work load. 

The system involves the use of hard-copy 
records by means of a combination of punched 
paper tape and magnetic ledger cards. Extremely 
versatile, the computer can be adapted to many 
facets of keeping and analyzing reocrds in addi- 
tion to its ability to furnish reports more quickly 
than has been possible in the past. 

In this period of municipal growth and ex- 
pansion, the burden of maintaining financial 
and statistical records has become proportionately 
heavier. The computer will permit the Town to 
keep pace with this work-load and to take a signi- 
ficant step forward in an effort to maintain a 
modern, fast and accurate system of accounts. 
The equipment will permit specifically the estab- 
lishment of a centralized accounting operation 




® 



for all Town departments including School. It 
is not anticipated that the system will result in a 
reduction in the number of Town employees. It 
will result, however, in at least two accomplish- 
ments. First, it will avoid the necessity of adding 
employees to meet the demands of a more com- 
plicated and of necessity, speedier administra- 
tion; and second, it will permit the production 
of current administrative reports which are so 
vital in administering the financial affairs of 
the Town of Andover. 

Accounting improvements were also effected 
during the year including the encumbering of 
appropriation accounts. The Town Accountant 
for the first time conducted pre-audits of all pur- 
chase-order expenditures. His certification that 
they conform to the legal requirements of the 
original appropriation and that there are funds 
available to pay for the services and/or supplies 
being ordered is required prior to the issuance of 
the order by the Town Manager. 

A new system of appropriation and revenue 
accounts was also developed and ties in with the 
electronic data processing system. This improve- 
ment along with the others effected in 1965 
promise more meaningful financial reporting, 
budget execution and control and generally, a 
mre careful accounting of tax dollars. 




Andover's Electronic Data Processing Installation. 



Town Treasurer 



Routine work of the Treasurer involved the 
preparation of an affidavit to foreclose 39 tax 
titles which will be offered for sale in 1966. Tax 
anticipation borrowing totaled $500,000.00 at an 
interest cost of $5,266.18. In the light of a total ex- 
penditure commitment in excess of $5,000,000.00 
for 1965, this amount is especially small. It was 
accomplished through almost daily consideration 
of expenses and ready cash to meet them. It is 
also an indication of the fiscal soundness of the 
Town of Andover. 

The Treasurer invested surplus funds during 
1965 in United States Treasury Bills, Certificates 
of Deposits, and Savings Accounts, earning for 
the Town's taxpayers interest totaling $20,234.08. 
Surplus funds from the Accelerated Public Works 
Program were also invested and made a return 
to the Town. 



Personnel 


Full-time 2 






Part-time 1 


Expenditures 




$16,145.00 


Monthly Cost 


Per Person 


6? 



The Town Treasurer's office sought to respond 
in 1965 to changes that were being planned during 
the past year and which will be place in full opera- 
tion in 1966. The preparation of payrolls promises 
to be a significantly improved operation in the 
coming year over previous years. 



As Custodian of the Margaret Grindell 
Towle Fund, the Town Treasurer received 
$98,313.59 which represents the balance due on 
the bequest. This made for a total of monies re- 
ceived in final settlement of the estate of 
$348,313.59. Investment of this fund under the 
direction of the Fund Trustees earned $10,908.61, 
with disbursements for beneficiaries totaling 
$6,037.27. 

Detailed reports of the various funds held in 
the custody of the Treasurer will be found in the 
financial section of this report. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS - GENERAL FUND: 

Balance January 1, 1965 
Receipts 



Disbursements 

Balance December 31, 1965 

*$1,709,335.67 invested in United States Treasury Bills, 
Certificate of Deposits, and Savings Accounts. 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS - CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT BOARD FUND: 

Balance January 1, 1965 
Receipts - including appropriation 



Disbursements - including investments 
Balance December 31, 1965 



$1,323,871.97 
7,403,935.16 

$8,727,807.13 
6,729,036.64 

$1,998,770.49 * 



$ 26,105.06 
218,646.76 

244,751.82 
202,634.37 

~$ 42,117.45 



ACCELERATED PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM: 

Balance January 1, 1965 

Receipts : Distribution from U.S. Government 
Income from Invested Funds 



Disbursements 

Balance December 31, 1965 

*$74,230.50 invested in U.S. Treasury Bills 



$ 87,307.68 

160,535.94 

2,065.97 

~$ 249,909.59 
172,849.37 

~$ 77,060.22 * 



Tax Collector 



Personnel 3 

Expenditures $17,207.00 

Monthly Cost Per Person 7$ 

Total collections for 1-965 again reached a new 
high of $4,252,743.26 which breaks downs as fol- 
lows: 

1965 Real Estate $3,332,341.34 

(3.2% uncollected) 
1965 Personal Property 162,737.60 

(2.5% uncollected) 
1965 Motor Vehicle Excise 465,856.43 

All other 291,807.89 



$4,252,743.26 
Bills issued during the year were - Motor 
Vehicles 11,109; Real Estate 7,194; Personal Pro- 
perty 939; and Farm Animal Excise 28; making 
a total of 19,270. 



The comitment on Real Estate was 
$3,480,117.60 and on Personal Property 
$169,041.20. 

Plans were made during 1965 to acquire and 
install a Receipting and Validating Machine. This 
sorely-needed piece of electrical equipment will 
increase the operating efficiency of the Collector's 
office so that the office will, in fact, function as a 
central collection agency. It is anticipated that the 
installation of this equipment will take place in 
February of 1966 and be fully operational for the 
1966 tax collection period. An attachment to the 
Receipting and Validating Machine will permit 
the capturing of certain basic transmission in- 
formation which will be processed by the elec- 
tronic data installation in the Town Accountant's 
office. 

It is with regret that the Town of Andover 
will see in 1966 the retirement of James P. 
Christie, Tax Collector. Jim has been with the 
Town since 1938. In a bit of nostalgia, he notes 
that in 1938, his first year in office, the total taxes 
collected were $474,072.00. 



Board of Assessors 




Personnel 


Full-time 4 




Part-time 2 


Expenditures 


$27,266.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


11^ 



It has become increasingly apparent to the 
Board of Assessors that, with the rapid growth of 
the Town, there are many problems and deficien- 
cies in the assessments presently being established 
for the various classes of property throughout the 
Town. The last complete revaluation of the Town 
was undertaken in 1957. Sound assessment prac- 
tice suggests the need for a thorough examination 
of property valuations at least once every ten 
years. With this in mind, the Board will request 
that the Town consider a property Value equaliza- 
tion program to be completed in 1966 for applica- 
tion in 1967. In many respects, this represents a 
housekeeping job and is required if the Town's 
financial house is to be kept in order. 



The matter of assessment ratios is debated 
frequently. The position of the Board is that the 
ratio of assessment is not nearly as important as 
the uniform application to every property of a 
ratio whatever it may be. Most municipal finance 
authorities agree that the higher the ratio of 
assessment to fair market value, the more equit- 
able is the system, as well as being more stable 
and less subject to fluctuation. Application of a 
uniform ratio also tends to assure compliance with 
the accepted maxim of asking each taxpayer to 
carry no more or no less than his fair share of 
the tax load. 

The total assessed value of all real estate in 
the Town of Andover in 1958 was $75,864,910 
and in 1965 was $102,356-,400 showing a growth 
of $26,491,490. This growth is remarkable in view 
of the loss in assessed value of approximately one 
and one-half million dollars of property taken by 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for Inter- 
state Route 495, and the fact that the increase is 
comprised mostly of residential values. 



Number of Persons Assessed - 7,003 

Valuation-Personal Property 

Valuation-Real Estate 

Total Valuation 

Tax Rate $34.00 per $1,000 Valuation 

Number of Acres Assessed 

Number of Dwellings Assessed 



$ 4,971,800.00 
$102,356,400.00 
$107,328,200.00 

18,115.65 
4,913 



TAX EXEMPTIONS GRANTED — 1965 



Over 70 

Veterans 

Blind 



17,578:93 

18,278.40 

714.00 



10 



REAL ESTATE EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION 

Clause 1-Property of United States 

Clause 2-Property of Commonwealth of Mass. 

Clause 3-Property of Literary Organizations 

Clause 3-Property of Charitable Organizations 

Clause 3-Property of Benevolent Organizations 

Clause 11-House of Religious Worship Parasonages 

Clause 12-Cemeteries 

Andover Housing Authority 

Property Put To A Public Use 

Number of Acres Exempt 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE 
Number of Vehicles Assessed 

Assessed Valuation 

Excise 

Tax Rate - $66 per $1,00 Valuation 



211,450.00 

339,350.00 

22,400,625.00 

73,275.00 

187,500.00 

191,000.00 

218,275.00 

906,250.00 

7,618,450.00 

2,962.74 

11,726 

9,506,265.00 

552,797.28 

42,085.67 



Town Counsel 



Personnel 


Part-time 1 


Expenditures 


$7,294.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


3^ 



At the beginning of 1965, thirteen cases in- 
volving the Town were pending in Court. During 
1965, fifteen new suits were started, and four 
claims were closed without payment, one claim 
with payment, four suits without payment one 
suit with payment, and one suit closed resulting 
in the acquisition of money by the Town. 

There were twenty-five Court appearances, 
and several appearances before administrative 
boards of the State Government. 

At the end of 1965, twenty-two cases involv- 
ing the Town were pending in Court. 

Town Clerk 

Personnel 3 

Expenditures $24,583.00 

Monthly Cost Per Person 10^ 

Functioning as the Town's chief election 
clerk as well as the official keeper of town re- 
cords, the Town Clerk has registered more than 
10,050 voters as of July 1, 1965. By precincts, 
they are as follows : 

1 2,001 

2 1,283 

3 1,756 

4 2,018 

5 820 

6 2,172 

Town Clerk also recorded 302 births (162 
male and 137 female) ; 179 deaths (88 male and 
81 female) ; and 178 marriages. 

In discharging his duties, the Town Clerk 
turned over to the Town Treasurer $13,429.05 in 
fees with the bulk of this amount coming from 
alcoholic beverage licenses ($8,780.00). 



He also supervised the taking of the 1965 
census which established town population at 
20,551, an increase of approximately 20% over the 
1960 Federal census figure. A worthwhile by- 
product of Ihe State census was the recoding of 
the information obtained in the census on punch 
cards. It will now be possible to maintain a con- 
tinuing census which should prove invaluable for 
planning purposes - particularly school. In the 
area of elections, voter registration records were 
also transferred onto punch cards. One of the 
desirable by-products of this new system will be 
a readily and more economically prepared voter 
registration list. It should also be of assistance in 
the preparation of street lists. 

It became quite clear during the year that 
the size of several of the voting precincts was 
reaching a point where it would become increas- 
ingly difficult to accommodate the numbers of 
voters and to tabulate election results efficiently 
and effectively. Andover's Town Clerk took a 
keen interest in this problem, especially in the 
light of legislation which was introduced in the 
Great and General Court to require Massachusetts 
municipalities to install voting machines to re- 
place the paper ballot. Taking a leading part in 
acknowledging the need for a change, he appeared 
before a Legislative Committee and argued per- 
suasively in favor of a new electronic voting sys- 
tem. Use of this equipment would require an act 
of the legislature. A pilot project which should 
indicate the feasibility of this equipment was ap- 
proved by the Legislature and will be conducted 
in Braintree. The most significant aspect of the 
proposed system, as against machine voting, is 
its initial cost. It is estimated that the Town of 
Andover would save $50,000.00 through the use 
of this system and be spared the problem of stor- 
age which results from the larger and consider- 
ably more expensive voting machine. The elec- 
tronic voting system also retains the historic 
paper ballot but with a modern way of counting 
it. The Town Clerk stands ready to demon- 
strate this system to anybody upon request. 



11 




Planning Board 

Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



1 
$10,595.00 



The Comprehensive Report, started in 1964, 
was completed under the "701" Program. Printed 
copies were made available to interested citizens 
at the end of Summer in 1965. This report rep- 
resented a general updating of Andover's Master 
Plan, completed some years previously. The study 
and its findings emphasize Andover's progressive 
viewpoint and its desire to meet the challenge of 
growth and change. 

In its advisory capacity to the Board of Sel- 
ectmen, the Planning Board and its consultant 
reviewed a number of possible sites for the pro- 
posed Municipal Office Building. The Board also 
re-studied the school-site question at the request 
of the School Committee and discussed the matter 
with them. 

Growing pains still plague the downtown 
business area, where parking is one of the major 
problems. The Planning Board feels that parking 
regulations are needed to provide for orderly 
growth. The Board has prepared an article, which 
it expects to place in the Annual Town Warrant, 
to add parking regulations to the Zoning Bylaw. 
This question has been the subject of considerable 
joint discussion with the Chamber of Commerce 
whose suggestions have resulted in changes and 
improvements in the draft of the regulations. An 
article has also been prepared to provide for the 
"rounding out" of the business district, placing 
boundaries between the business and residential 
districts in the middle of streets wherever feasi 
ble. Professional office uses in existing buildings 
in Residential A Districts immediately adjacent 
to commercial zones are being proposed in still 
another article under preparation for the war- 
rant. 

Several years ago the Town, at the Board's 
urging, recognized the restrictive effects of con- 



ventional zoning and added a Special Development 
provision to the Bylaw. This allows the devel- 
opment of subdivisions which preserve the natural 
features of the area, thus avoiding a stereotyped 
format. Seven developers, whose plans met the 
requirements governing the Special Development 
arrangement, chose this method in providing 
house sites where the beauty of wooded sections 
was preserved and natural drainage areas were 
included as part of the specified green areas. 

A total of fourteen subdivisions were sub- 
mitted in 1965. These contained a total of four 
hundred nine (409) house lots. Already ap- 
proved are eleven with one hundred fifty one 
(151) house lots. The remaining three plans, 
which were submitted in preliminary form late 
in the year, are still pending. These involved two 
hundred fifty eight (258) lots. A total of 
sixty nine (69) Form A plans with one hundred 
twenty eight (128) lots were also submitted and 
approved. 

In a meeting with the Conservation Com- 
mission of the Town the provisions of Chapter 
220 were discussed. This new state legislation 
provides means for control of water courses and 
flood plains through hearings on a local level at 
which recommendations can be developed for 
transmission to the State Department of Natural 
Resources. The Planning Board plans to amend 
its rules and regulations to provide that a copy 
of all subdivision plans be furnished to the Con- 
servation Commission, thus keeping them abreast 
of the development of the Town. 

The Board continued to take active part in the 
development of planning throughout the Com- 
monwealth by active participation in the meet- 
ings and activities of the Massachusetts Federa- 
tion of Planning Boards. 

In line with the future development of the 
Town, the Planning Board intends to continue 
its study of means to encourage healthy and 
proper development of the Central Business Dis- 
trict. Also under scrutiny will be the question of 
a need for a professional and office building zone 
category. The possibilities and problems of clus- 
ter-type apartment districts will also be studied. 
A review of the Master Plan by the Board will be 
made to locate any "soft" spots which may tend 
to reduce the effectiveness of the overall plan. 



1900 



1965 



1980 



If 
tit 

Hi Mi 

m m tti 

Each symbol = 4,000 



POPULATION 

GROWTH, 1900-80(Es».) 



6,813 



17,134 



20,551 



40,000<Est.) 



12 



Municipal Buildings 



Expenditures 


$21,278.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


8(- 



The past year could be characterized as the 
year of improved housekeeping. With funds pro- 
vided by the Town Meeting-, a major program of 
improvements was undertaken at the Ballardvale 
Community Center in particular. A new roof was 
installed ; the entire building was painted ; the 
heating system improved ; combination storm 
windows installed ; a stainless-steel kitchen sink 
installed ; and the building gounds graded, loamed 
and seeded. The work culminated in the erection 
of a flag pole and its dedication by the Board of 
Selectmen on Memorial Day. The building is 
available for community purposes. 

The Richardson School was also demolished 
and the area filled in and graded. It is always sad 
to mark the passing of a building which has served 
the Town as well as this schoolhouse. However, 
the plot will continue to be used by children as a 
play area and with additional loaming and seeding 
should be enjoyed by its neighbors. 

In view of new State Safety Regulations re- 
lating to nursing homes, the "Infirmary" build- 
ing on Carmel Road was closed. This building 
was rented for some years by the Town for pri- 
vate use as such a home. It was determined, how- 
ever, that the cost of making the building con- 
form to the new State Regulations would have 
been prohibitive. Plans presently call for the sub- 
mission of a Warrant Article in 1966 to permit 
the sale of the building and the grounds on which 
it lies for public auction. The Board of Selectmen 
offered the Bradlee School for sale once again 
during 1965. No bids were received. The building 
however, has been boarded up and has remained 
free from vandalism or other damage. Mainten- 
ance of the present Town Hall was accelerated 
and although it is a difficult building to keep in 
good order because of its limited size, increased 
use, and age, it has been kept in a satisfactory 
manner. 

Of greatest significance during 1965 was the 
work accomplished on new buildings. Design work 
was completed and construction started on the 
Memorial Hall Library addition. This work should 
be completed by Fall of 1966. A Federal grant of 
$85,000.00 was received to assist in the financing 
of this project. The Town Garage project which 
involves the construction of a pre-engineered 
steel building of some 10,000 square feet was 
started in November of 1965 and will be ready 
for occupancy in the early summer of 1966. This 
modern facility will permit the housing of all 
town equipment and the improvement of equip- 
ment maintenance procedures. The West An- 
dover Fire Station has proceeded satisfactorily 
and with the selection of an architect in the Fall 
of 1965, plans were being prepared at the close of 
the year. Bids will be taken on this project in 



February of 1966 with work to commence as soon 
as weather permits and to be completed within 
approximately six months. Construction of the 
Town Hall and the Police Station were delayed 
in 1965 in view of the need for careful selection 
of appropriate sites. This matter should be re- 
solved early in 1966 and work proceed soon there- 
after. 

The report of the secondary School Building 
Committee will be found in another section of 
this report and describes the progress in the con- 
struction of the Senior High School. The School 
Committee requested the Town Manager to pro- 
ceed with the preparation of plans for a new 24- 
classroom elementary school in South Andover. 
As approved by the Board of Selectmen, a loan 
request has been made of the United States Hous- 
ing and Home Finance Agency to permit the de- 
velopment of detailed plans and specifications 
for this building. This would permit the submis- 
sion to a Town Meeting for appropriate action of 
an accurate picture of the physical and financial 
requirements involved in such a building. 

The Board of Selectmen, as authorized by a 
special Town Meeting in 1965, acquired the so- 
called Shorten property on Park Street. Demoli- 
tion of the building on the land will proceed in 
1966 if funds are made available for this purpose. 
Initially, the site will be used for off-street park- 



ing. 



"The Old" Town Garage. 




13 



Conservation Commission 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



The Conservation Commission met monthly 
throughout the year. The 1-965 commission was 
joined by Mrs. Virginia Hammond who serves as 
a committee member appointed by the chairman 
and Mrs. James Keck as the League of Women's 
Voters representative to the Commission. 

In 1965, the Commission organized the fol- 
lowing committees among its members: finance, 
education, public relations, land acquistion and 
a liaison committee keeping in contact with other 
Town Boards. 

The Commission recommended to the Town 
through a letter to the Town Manager and Board 
of Selectmen that certain tracts of land be pre- 
served in their natural state. These included 
Carmel Woods, Pole Hill, the Haggett's Pond wat- 
ershed. Some of this land is already in Town own- 
ership and its present use should not be changed. 
Other pieces of land should be acquired by the 
Town and it was recommended that the Town 
look into the acquistion of the now unused sand 
and gravel pit adjacent to Pomp's Pond. 

Commission members attended an early sum- 
mer meeting with the Town manager, Board of 
Health and state health officials concerning the 
possible pollution of Shawsheen River. The mem- 
bers maintained a survey of the river through- 
out the Summer months with the aid of Mr. Frank 
Serio of Ballardvale. The June meeting of the 
Commission was held at the Reichold Chemical 
Plant. With a plant engineer as a guide, the 
members took a tour of the plant's waste disposal 
system. Later Mrs. Kellogg attended a meeting in 
Bedford with other Conservation Commission 
members from towns through which the Shaw- 
sheen River flows. All agreed to work together to 
take the necessary steps to keep the Shawsheen 
River clean. The Commission recommends strong- 
ly that this river be kept clean and its banks, 
flood plain and adjoining wetlands be preserved. 

In November the Commission met and then 
adjourned to the Selectmen's conference room 
and attended the hearing of the Acreage Develop- 
ment Corp. of Peabody to fill certain land they 
own along the Fish Brook Flood Plain. To deter- 
mine if the filling of this land was a threat to 
the future water supply of the Town by danger of 
discoloring or polluting the Fish Brook Dam 
water supply, the Selectmen, Commission mem- 
bers and the Town water engineer surveyed the 
property on a Saturday morning. It was a unani- 
mous vote of the Selectmen that the Acreage 
Development Corp. not be allowed to fill this land 
in light of the findings made on the inspection 
trip. This work came under the new HATCH 
Act (Chapter 220) of the General Laws) re- 
quiring landowners to get permission before 
filling any wetland. 



In December the Commission met with the 
Planning Board in an attempt to gain more coop- 
eration in the following areas : wetland and flood 
plain survey, enlargement of Harold Parker For- 
est, Regional Conservation Commissions, Hatch 
Act interpretation, and the requirements of de- 
velopers to give a copy of sub-division plans for 
use of the Commission. 

In December, the Commission met with the 
Planning Board and other interested groups to 
discuss a soil survey or resoursse inventory. 
The Commission has voted to ask for additional 
funds at town meeting to acquire land, mostly 
wetlands and flood plain. 

Industrial Development 
Commission 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$1,208.00 



During 1965 construction work was begun 
on two substantial revenue-producing facilities 
in West Andover's industrially zoned property. 
Allied Chemical's regional warehouse and office 
was nearing completion by the end of the year. 
Ground work was also well along at the Valle 
restaurant site. The Industrial Commission feels 
that these facilities, together with the new In- 
ternal Revenue office, will provide a nucleus which 
will eventually attract other desirable commer- 
cial establishments to the Route 93 area. 

Two major projects, aimed at providing com- 
plete and accurate information to prospective 
purchasers of industrial property, were carried 
to completion during 1965. The existing maps of 
all West Andover industrial areas were updated 
and the associated property owners lists were re- 
vised. In addition, questionnaires were sent to 
all owners of industrial property asking for such 
information as land use, available utilities and 
willingness to sell. This data was summarized to 
provide more complete knowledge of properties 
available. 

The Commission continued in 1965 the prac- 
tice of sending promotional letters to key execu- 
tives in major corporations throughout the coun- 
try. It is felt that, with the advantages Andover 
has to offer as a prestige location, this program 
may eventually be productive. 

During the year, all appropriate leads 
brought to the Commission's attention were fol- 
lowed to a conclusion through letters and asso- 
ciated promotional material, telephone calls and 
personal visits. The Commission will continue to 
follow up on all prospects that it feels will be of 
benefit to the Town of Andover. 



14 



Board of Appeals 



Personnel 


Part-time 1 


Expenditures 


$1,288.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


V*$ 



During the year 1965, the thirtieth year of 
the Andover Zoning By-law, the Board heard 47 
cases which were disposed of as follows : 



26 petitions granted 
12 petitions denied 
2 petitions withdrawn after hearing 

was held 
7 petitions pending as of December 31, 
1965 
A total of $548.00 was turned over to the 
Town Treasurer for advertising fees collected for 
the year ending December 31, 1965. 




PUBLIC 
SAFETY 



Police Department 



Personnel 




40 


(Including School 


Crossing 


Guards) 


Expenditures 


$243,214.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 




97^ 



During the year 1965 there was no change 
in police personnel, which consists of a chief, 5 
sergeants, 22 regular patrolmen, 4 reserve offic- 
ers, 10 women traffic supervisors, and 2 dogs. 
The police clerk retired, and at the present time 
the position is still open. One more civilian is em- 
ployed as a maintenance man. 

In 1965, 3,143 miscellaneous complaints re- 
sulted in police action being taken. This is an 
increase of 636 over 1964, and 1235 over 1963. 
During the year there were 274 arrests made, an 
increase of 80 over 1964, and 4 more than in 
1963. The 1965 arrests included 132 traffic vio- 
lations and 11 juvenile arrests. Also there were 
67 arrests for drunkeness. 

In 1965 the police department issued 2,208 
parking tags, an increase of 282 over 1964. Also 
499 violation notices were sent to the Registry of 




Motor Vehicles, an increase of 154 over 1964, and 
69 over 1963. 

There were 389 motor vehicle accidents dur- 
ing the year which is 4 less than 1964, but 53 
more than in 1963. The 1965 accidents include 
2 fatalities, 189 personal injury accidents, and 
196 property damage accidents. 

In 1965 police vehicles travelled 284,666 
miles, an increase of 56,655 miles over 1964, and 
67,177 miles over 1963. An additional unmarked 
police cruiser was acquired in 1965 as provided 
by the Annual Town Meeting. A radar unit was 
also purchased and put to good advantage for 
speed control during the year. 

An especially brutal murder of one of An- 
dover's citizens and businessmen was perpetra- 
ted and solved in 1965. Through assidous and 
trained police work by the Andover Police De- 
partment with other police agencies principally 
the City of Lawrence and the Massachusetts 
State Police, the murderer was taken into custody 
and convicted of the crime. 

Training continued to be of prime import- 
ance during 1965. Of special significance was 
the marksmanship courses conducted by the Chief 
of Police. U. S. Military Police demonstrated var- 
ious prisoner control techniques to the officers of 
the Department. 



15 



Andover was honored by the appointment 
of its Chief by the Governor to a State Police 
Training Commission which is charged with the 
responsibility of implementing and enforcing the 
manadatory police training law which goes into 
effect in 1966. Massachusetts is one of four states 



in the nation which requires that newly-appointed 
police officers must complete satisfactorily an 
accredited training program within one year of 
appointment as a police officer. Failure to meet 
this requirement makes an appointee inelegible 
to continue as a law enforcement officer. 



POLICE MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING - 1965 




SLOW DOWN & 
L I V E 



393 



389 







W 



A, '**■« 






16 



Fire Department 



Personnel 


40 


Expenditures 


$327,825.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


$1.30 



Quarterly inspections required by statutes in 
nursing homes, rest homes, hospitals and inns 
were conducted and the necessary reports filed. 
Public and Private school fire drills and inspect- 
ions required by law were conducted. Mercantile, 
Industrial, Church, Garage and Service Station 
buildings were inspected for hazards and reports 
filed. Appropriate recommendations were sent to 
owners and/or occupants. Dwellings of three (3) 
or more apartments were inspected for fire pre- 
vention and recommendations and suggestions 
made to owners and /or occupants. 

The 1965 inspection program was, in fact, 
the most aggressive conducted by the Department 
in its history. A single piece of radio-equipped 
apparatus was assigned with a full complement of 
fire fighters to undertake "in service" inspections. 
In the event of a fire call, the men and equipment 



are able to respond immediately and without de- 
lay. In this way more efficient and effective use 
of personnel and apparatus is achieved. It is an- 
ticipated that a second fire truck will be assigned 
in 1966 to this important and result- producing 
task. 

Fire prevention continues to be the major 
goal of the Department. Of 73 building fires in 
1965, 43 or more than half of the total, were 
caused by carelessness - children playing with 
matches, grass or brush burning or careless 
smoking. Other major fire incidents involved 
motor vehicles (47) ; oil burners (9) ; and brush 
and grass (142). Of this latter figure, 21 calls 
were required at the Town Dump. Fires also 
claimed two (2) lives during the year. 

As this report was filed, a new 1,000 gallon 
per-minute Class "A" pumper was delivered to 
the Department as provided by an appropriation 
of the 1965 Annual Town Meeting. Diesel-power- 
ed and fully-equipped, this unit will undergo ex- 
tensive testing before being placed into service. 
When this occurs, one of the other modern pieces 
of fire fighting equipment will be transferred to 
the Ballardvale Fire Station. It will replace a 
thirty-five year old pumper. 






200 


H 


uP^ 


150 


O 


pfffi 


U 
S 




100 


A 
N 




50 


D 
S 







$ 

1 



AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION 



F 

I 

R 
E 




1961 



'62 



'63 



"64 



"65 



17 




___________ 





1965 


1964 


1963 


1962 


1961 


Service Calls 


1916 


1879 


1868 


1482 


1630 


Fires 


448 


466 


464 


317 


278 


False Alarms 


17 


6 


8 


12 


9 


Mutual Aid Calls 


18 


8 


9 


9 


2 


Approx. assessed 
value of Buildings 
when fire occured. 


$2,208,936.00 


$2,502,075.00 


$2,332,695.00 


$4,901,455.00 


$2,158,320.00 


Approx. loss from 
fires reported. 


$ 155,800.00 


$ 180,650.00 


$ 160,240.00 


$ 110,636.00 


$ 135,672.00 


Ambulance Calls 


725 


725 


797 


597 


617 


Non-Residents billed 
for Ambulance use. 


85 


80 


81 


80 


73 


Open-Air Fire 
Permits Issued. 


2506 


2800 


4700 


5000 


3300 


Violations Issued 
for Open-Air Fires 


66 


33 


68 


44 


20 


Fuel Oil Burner Permits 
Issue and Inspected 


144 


146 


257 


195 


146 


Use of Explosive 
Permits Issued 


40 


38 


44 


18 


19 


Inspection of Bldgs. 


1183 


714 


476 


300 


— 


Fire Drills Conducted 
throughout Schools 


120 


92 


88 






Fatalities due to Fire 


2 


— 








— 


( 1 Fatality due to smoking) 
( 1 Fatality due to improper 


wiring) 















18 



Civil Defense 



Personnel 


Part-time 1 




Many Volunteers 


Expenditures 


$1,886.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


%l 



As in the past, regular groups continued their 
meetings and rills. Volunteer time to attend these 
meetings and to perform Civil Defense duties, 
principally police traffic work, totaled more than 
3,500 man hours. Personnel were called out once 
during the year to search for a lost person. Auxil- 
iary Police and Communications people were out 
during "Operation Pumpkin" and assisted the 
Town Police Department in controlling the over- 
abundance of energy of the Town's younger citi- 
zens. Fourteen (14) Civil Defense people took and 
passed a radiological monitoring course. Five (5) 
took and passed the advanced course in monitor- 
ing. 

Andover was commended by the Governor's 
office for its shelter-marking and stocking pro- 
gram which has been completed. The Town stands 
as one of two municipalities in the Commonwealth 
to have accomplished this objective. One shelter 
was added to the Town's system making a total 
of 16. 

The Federal Government has resurveyed the 
present shelters and has up-dated them. The Town 
presently has a capability of sheltering approxi- 
mately 40,000 persons. However, by the end of 



1965 approximately 22,000 spaces were stocked. 
Along these lines, a shelter utilization program 
for every resident of the Town will be completed 
by December 1966. This plan will be made known 
to the public as soon as practical. 

THE TOWN CONTINUES TO NEED MORE 
VOLUNTEERS FOR EVERY PHASE OF CIVIL 
DEFENSE. 

Work continues on a program to have at 
least one person in each family in the Town com- 
plete the medical self-help program. This has been 
completed by the Fire Department under the dir- 
ection of Deputy Chief John Cole. 2,000 medical 
self-help kits have bben delivered to the School 
Department for use by them under the supervision 
of Athletic Director Donald Dunn. 

During the month of November, a test of 
Civil Defense units was conducted during the 
northeast United States blackout. Approximately 
30 Civil Defense people reported to the Town 
Hall within 45 minutes of the start of this emer- 
gency. Several additional groups called and of- 
fered assistance. This experience indicates the 
preparedness of the Civil Defnse organization 
or spoetend successfully to any emergency. 

In the next year, courses will be made avail- 
able to Town citizens. If any group wishes to have 
any special program on Civil Defense, please con- 
tact the Director. 

Finally, program papers were prepared by 
the Director and approved by the Federal overn- 
ment. This makes the Town eligible for matching 
funds under Federal Civil Defense programs. 





Animal Control 


L ■ 




Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 


Part-time 1 
$660.00 

v*4 







"A Dogs Best Friend (Rabies Clinic, 1965)" 

Calls made for unlicensed dogs appearing on warrant 162 

Stray dogs reported 66 

Stray dogs picked up 46 

Complaints 57 

Investigations 73 

Dog bites reported 9 

Lost dogs reported 62 

Lost cats reported 6 

Dead dogs picked up and buried 11 

:... 2 

12 

4 

1 

1837 

5.7 



Dead cats picked up and burried 

Dogs returned to owners 

Dogs sent to Harvard Medical School 

Dogs sent to Mass. Dept. of Public Health for rabies test 
Total mileage driven on calls 
Average mileage per call 



Total days dogs boarded at cost of $1.00 per day 302 



19 



Electrical Inspection 

Personnel Part-time 1 

Expenditures $4,026.00 

Monthly Cost Per Person 1 Vi f 



During the year 1965, there were 536 electrical 
permits issued and categorized as follows: 

Addition and Alterations 253 

New Structures 279 

Re-inspections 3 

Void permit 1 



Total fees turned over to the Town Treasurer were $1,292.00. The Electrical Inspector's position is 
part-time. 



Weights and Measures 

Personnel- -.. Part-time 1 

Expenditures $ 1 ,856.00 

Monthly Cost Per Person % $ 

For many years the administration of 
weights and measures has maintained a static or 
status quo position. There has been a lack of im- 
petus of sufficient momentum to place the wheels 
of progress in a position of ascendancy. Conse- 
quently, until recent years, the status quo position 
had begun to deteriorate to a stage of regression 
while we of weights and maesures deplored the 
lack of proper recognition on the part of the pub- 
lic and were really disturbed by the fact that 
other segments of government advanced and con- 
tinuously offered to the public a more favorable 
image. There was no concerted effort to improve 
our public relations or by suggesting needed re- 
visions of archaic laws. We failed to recognize the 
existing inadequacies which were contributing to 
our dilemma ; rather like the ostrich, some buried 
their heads dismissing the factual from their 
minds hoping that in so doing there would be 
some stroke of magic that would change condi- 
tions. 

Unquestionably, some of us did make a de- 
gree of progress within the confines of our own 
municipalities. A better understanding of the ben- 
efits that could accrue from good administrative 
proceedure and the importance of maintaining 
an active weights and measures department was 
transmitted to the public in a limited area, usu- 
ally within the confines of the particular munici- 
pality. Thru the combined efforts of the Con- 
sumers' Council and the state Weights and Mea- 
sures Department, effective legislation has cor- 
rected inadequacies and evils present in existing 
laws. Enactment of Chapter #243 provides for 
a minimum penalty of a fine of not less than fifty 
dollars for a first offense for giving or attempt- 
ing to give insufficient weight or measure. For 
too many years, people convicted of giving insuf- 
ficient weight or measure received a token fine 
of fiye dollars. Chapter #98 was amended, sub- 
stantially increasing fees for sealing certain 
weighing and measureing devices. Chapter #94 
was amended thru the efforts of the Consumers' 
Council requiring all food items offered for sale 



in package form to be plainly and conspicuously 
marked in terms of; weight, measure, numerical 
count. All meats, poultry and edible fish in pack- 
age form must carry the price per pound of con- 
tents and total sale price. Chapter #94 has ma- 
terially percentage wise reduced shortweight and 
overpricing in the sale of prepackaged meats, 
poultry and edible fish. Other states have endeav- 
ored to enact similar legislation without success. 

This Departments replacement program, pur- 
chasing new State Standard avoirdupois weights 
ranging from 1/1 6th oz., to five (5) pounds was 
completed with appropriation of necessary funds 
at the 1965 Town Meeting. These weights are 
non-magnetic, non-corrosive manufactured of 
stainless steel and calibrated to S-l tolerances, 
(superior to weights in adjacent localities). 

This Department was one of the first in the 
Commonwealth to obtain the use of the new revo- 
lutionary Massachusetts heavy-capacity scale test- 
ing unit during 1965, enabling this Department 
to test the communities industrial vehicle scales 
to capacity. Accuracy certification is of utmost 
importance for industry. Adequate and proper 
testing proceedures allow equity to prevail. 

A total of 6,418 prepackaged items were in- 
spected for package content and marking. 4,101 
municipal purchases "(school food, drink-fuel 
oils, gasoline-general commodities) were inspected 
and tested for proper content. 

A total of 173 weighing and measuring de- 
vices were tested for compliance and accuracy. 
Sealing fees amounted to $269.80. Receipts a- 
mounting to $246.30 were turned over to the Town 
Treasurer. 

Building Inspection 



Personnel 


2 


Expenditures 


$12,086.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


5* 



There were 572 permits of all kinds issued 
during the year and categorized as follows : 

The valuation is considerably higher this year 
due to the additions and alterations to churches, 
educational buildings, and Town-owned property. 

Of the total permits issued in 1965, 554 of 
them were for structures which ultimately will be 
taxable. These had a value of $6,266,893.00. 



20 



Fees collected for the year 1965 totaled 
$9,098.00. 

There were 65 Certificates of Occupancy is- 
sued. 

A great number of zoning and building viola- 
tions were handled, investigated and followed up. 
Most of the violations were corrected amicably 
and quickly. 

Board of Appeals applications were processed 
through this office which necessitates preliminary 
checking prior to the public hearing. 

Gravel removal operations have been under 
constant inspection this year. The new regulations 



No. 




197 


New Structures 


269 


Additions and Alterations 


49 


Raze and Demolization 


37 


Swimming Pools 


6 


Renewals 


14 


Signs 



572 



PUBLIC 
WORKS 

Highways 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



17 

$126,374.00 
50^ 



adopted by the Board of Selectmen in 1964 for 
use in the issuance of permits have benefitted the 
Town both aesthetically and financially. 

All electrical permits are issued by and re- 
cords kept in this office. 

The Building Inspector's office in 1965 clearly 
was not self-supporting as should be the case. 
Fees collected from users for the benefit of these 
same users should cover the cost of inspection 
services. With this in mind, an upward revision 
in fees will be submitted to the Town for its con- 
sideration in 1966. 



Valuation 


Fee 


$7,118,813.00 


$7,678.00 


889,662.00 


1,172.00 


13,624.00 


112.00 


61,695.00 


72.00 


850.00 


12.00 


21,465.00 


52.00 


$8,116,109.00 


$9,098.00 










■■a*; 









During the year, 50 miles of street were 
treated with MC-3 asphalt and sand as well as 
being honed. Sections of Lowell and Andover 
Streets were treated with RC-5 asphalt and pea 
stone. A total of 109,000 gallons of asphalt was 
used in these programs. 

River Road from the City of Lawrence line 
to the Old North School, Andover Street from Hall 
Avenue to the railroad tracks and the intersection 
of Andover Street and Dascomb Road were 
paved with two courses of Type I bituminous con- 
crete. This latter intersection was also completely 
redesigned and reconstructed and included the 
widening of Andover Street, reduction of a curve 
and the rerouting of traffic entering the inter- 



section from Dascomb Road. Coupled with the 
installation of mercury-vapor street lights, what 
was once a particularly unsafe intersection has 
become considerably safer. The Department also 
reconstructed and supervised the paving of more 
than one-half mile of Spring Grove Cemetery 
roadways. 

Lovejoy Road reconstruction under Chapter 
•90 was finally completed. This included the in- 
stallation of a paved sidewalk from Lowell Street 
to the Sanborn School. Cement sidewalk slabs in 
Shawsheen Village and along Main Street were 
repaired. Bituminous sidewalks were constructed 
in several areas including Haverhill Street. 

Old stone culverts on Salem Street were re- 



21 



placed with 80 feet of 48 inch concrete pipe. A 
similar culvert was replaced on Highland Road 
with 120 feet of 48 inch concrete pipe. A stone 
culvert on Beacon Street was also replaced. 
Drainage improvements on Rattlesnake Ridge 
Road were also completed in the Fall. 

All bridges under the supervision of the De- 
partment were inspected periodically. No repairs 
were required. Street sweepings and other suit- 
able fill material were hauled to the Chandler 
Road landfill area. 

Total snowfall for the year was 33 inches 
with 18 inches falling in January alone. 

Parks 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$16,601.00 

7<t 



The Park Department maintains two regular 
sized baseball diamonds at the Central Playstead 
as well as two Little League fields ; one regular 
sized diamond at the Woburn Strret Playstead and 
three little league fields ; and also Little League 
fields to the rear of the West Center School. Por- 
table bleachers were erected at the little League 
and football fields at the Central School area. 
The permanent bleachers were repaired and 
painted. 

Fertilizer was applied at both the Pard on 
Chestnut St. and the playstead areas. These areas 
were also rolled. 

The department added to its duties in 1965 
the care and maintenance of some 15 grass plot 
areas within the Town. 

Trees 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$50,353.00 

21 6 



The regular yearly tree planting program 
was somewhat curtailed in 1-965 due to severe 
drought conditions. A total of 115 shade and or- 
namental trees were planted and maintained. Var- 
ieties set out this year included Sugar and Nor- 
way Maples, Katsuras, Little Leaf Lindens, Wil- 
lows and Kwanzan Flowering Cherries. Many 
houng street trees planted during the past few 
years showed definite signs of water deficiency 
during the growing season. These trees were fer- 
tilized and watered several times. 

Dutch Elm disease appeared in 76 public 
trees this year. These elms were cut down and 
burned. An additional 45 dead and beetle infested 
elms were removed with the assistance of person- 
nel and equipment from the Massachusetts De- 
partment of Natural Resources. This State Agency 
also assisted in Dutch Elm scouting work. A 
number of dead and hazardous trees growing 



through utility wires were removed by joint ef- 
fort of the New England Telephone Company, the 
Massachusetts Electric Company and the Andover 
Tree Bureau. 

The forest improvement plan at Haggett's 
Pond watershed area was continued. Several 
acres were cleared of dead and fallen trees and 
undesirable growth. Work will continue on this 
project. 

Andover's shade tree spray program, designed 
to protect trees from disease and destructive in- 
sects, was performed using approved insecticides 
and application methods. Three Tree Bureau 
members hold licenses enabling them to apply 
presticides in Massachusetts. State law requires 
that persons applying pesticides to land of an- 
other be qualifies and licensed by written exam- 
ination. 

The continuing drought adversely affected 
many older street trees. Over 40 maples died and 
were removed. Many others indicated lack of wat- 
er. Dead tops and branches, wilting, and prema- 
ture leaf dropping were observed during the 
growing season. This damage will persist as long 
as drought conditions prevail. From safety and 
esthetic standpoints, dead wood must be removed. 
Therefore, pruning and dead wood removal will 
be a continuing problem. 

Routine tree work of low branch removal, 
cabling, bark tracing and street light clearing 
was carried on. Brush cutting, chemical brush 
control and roadside mowing was continued along 
roads and at recreation and playground areas. 
Tree removal hearings were held, supervision and 
inspection of utility wire clearing crews per- 
formed and new wire and pole construction gone 
over in detail with utility company arborists and 
engineers. Wire clearance is becoming an increas- 
ingly important task due to increased demands 
for telephone and electric service and the neces- 

BEFORE 




fell ■ 



AFTER 




Improvement cutting at Haggett's Pond watershed area. 



22 



sary maintenance and preservation of public 
shade trees. 

The newly purchased sprayer and brush 
chipper were used extensively and have proven 
adequate to perform required duties. Chips pro- 
duced by the brush chipping unit have been used 
to cover the sliding slope at Camp Olympia and 
also to stablize slopes along roads in several sec- 
tions of Andover. 

Tree Bureau personnel worked during all 
ice and snow storms operating truck and side- 
walk plows, also salting and sanding streets and 
sidewalks. 



Street Lighting 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$39,467.00 
16r 



As part of the Town's continuing program 
to improve street lighting throughout the Town, 
65 street lights were added to the Town's system 
during 1965. This makes a total of 1,244 street 
lights rented by the Town from the Mass. Electric 
Company. The improvements resulted in an addi- 
tion of 681,500 lumens. Over and above the in- 
stallation of new lights in residential areas, three 
major lighting projects were completed during 
the year which have added principally to the pro- 
motion of traffic safety. These areas are the in- 
tersection of Dascomb Road and Andover Street; 
the Abbot Bridge at Central and Andover Streets ; 
and Lowell Street from U.S. Route 93 to Lovejoy 
Road. Each of these locales represented highly 
dangerous situations where street lighting could 
promote traffic safety. 

Engineering 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



1 
$8,977.00 



During 1965 the Engineering Bureau was re- 
sponsible for the design and field layout of sur- 
face water drainage projects on Salem Street, 
Beacon Street, and Highland Road; lines and 
grades for the widening of Andover Street at 
Dascomb Road; grades for the new roadway to 
the swimming area at the Recreation Park; and 
roadway improvements at the Prospect Hill Res- 
ervoir. The Town Engineer also acted as clerk of 
works on the site work for the senior high school 
for several weeks at the start of the project. 

Site plans were prepared for the architects 
for the proposed Town Garage on Lewis Street 
and the proposed West Andover Fire Station. The 
construction plans and specifications were drawn 
for the 4600 lineal feet of 12 inch water mains 
installed in Dascomb Road and Cross Street. 
Betterment plans were drawn and filed for the 
sewer extension on Lowell Street and for the 
water main extensions on Dascomb Road and 



Cross Street, Bellevue Road, Haggett's Pond 
Road and County Road. 

Preliminary plans for three (3) new sub- 
divisions and definitive plans for nine (9) more 
new subdivisions of land with a total of 409 lots 
were reviewed for the Planning Board for con- 
formance with their rules and regulations and 
for the adequacy of the proposed utilities. Road- 
way and utilities construction were regularly 
inspected for the Planning Board in some 10 
subdivisions. 

Coordination was supplied between the Town 
government and various consultants, utility com- 
panies and other governmental agencies on en- 
gineering matters; for example, the County En- 
gineers on highway land taking, the Mass. 
Dept. of Public Works on Chapter 90 constuction 
and Rogers Brook, Mass Electric Co. and Law- 
rence Gas Co. on Town construction projects. 

The Engineering Bureau was able to assist 
many individuals, groups and Town departments 
seeking information as to sites, existing utilities, 
and streets layouts. 



SANITATION 
AND WASTE 



Sewers 

Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$22,504.00 



Highlight of the year was the completion 
and placement into full operation of the acceler- 
ated sewer program financed in part by a direct 
grant from the Federal Government as part of 
the so-called Federal Accelerated Public Works 
Program. This three-year project included the in- 
stallation of approximately thirteen (13) miles 
of sewer mains and auxiliary facilities such as 
pumps. The Federal grant totaled $790,160.94 of 
the total project budget of $1,548,608.94. The 
Town's share of the project cost is being financed 
from the proceeds of the sale of $855,000.00 in 
bonds and an initial cash appropriation of 
$25,000.00. A balance of $77,060.22 remains in 
the account, part of which will be held in reserve 
to meet any possible damage costs resulting 
from five (5) suits presently filed against the 
Town. 



23 



The Town's sanitary sewer system now con- 
sists of approximately seventy-five (75) miles 
of mains which serve an estimated 35% of the 
Town's area and a population in excess of 8,500 
people. 

In addition to the major construction ac- 
complishment of 1965, 110 service connections 
were made for new system users making a total 
of 2,344 connections. The Bureau also answered 
calls for assistance in relieving 235 sewer blocks. 



Landfill 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



1 
$13,867.00 



Satisfactory and perhaps more properly, san- 
itary operation of the Town's disposal area at 
Ledge and Chandler Roads continued to plague 
the Town during 1965. Despite a well-publicized 
prohibition on burning, fires represented one of 
the most serious and disturbing problems in seek- 
ing to operate and to maintain a satisfactory 
facility. Blowing paper was also a problem but 
of lesser importance than indiscriminate burning. 



Equipment was hired during the year in order to 
salvage cover material available on the Town- 
owned land. Unfortunately, the combination of 
the elements, heavy use of the clump by Town 
citizens, carelessness by users and inadequate 
personnel and equipment resulted in an unsatis- 
factory year of operations. 

An additional effort to provide more effec- 
tive control over use of the dump was undertaken 
in 1965 through the issuance of new and more 
permanent Andover Facilities stickers. A nominal 
charge of 25c per sticker was made in order to 
cover their cost. This technique did result in some 
improvements particularly in discouraging non- 
residents from using a service paid for by Andov- 
er taxpayers. 

There appears to be no sensible reason why 
the landfill cannot be operated in an acceptable 
manner. Funds will be requested in 1966 to ac- 
complish this objective. The Town's present fa- 
cility is neither quaint nor clean. The Town's 
concern quite properly is over the latter but the 
fact that most Town residents treat it as some 
thing unique at least and at most an occasional 
discomfort, has made it impossible for adequate 
steps to be taken in order to make it a community 
asset rather than a neighborhood liability. 



PUBLIC 
HEALTH 




Board of Health 



Personnel 


Full-time 2 




Part-time 2 


Expenditures 


$19,980.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


8<t 



The Board of Health issued 990 permits and 
licenses during the past year. Of this number, 310 
were for plumbing, 249 for gas, 112 for septic 
tanks, 110 for sale of milk and oleomargarine, 57 
for food service establishments, and 34 for swim- 
ming pools. Some 423 inspections and tests were 
conducted by the Board including 154 food hand- 
ling establishments. Ninety miscellaneous com- 



plaints were investigated. The Board approved 
127 sewage disposal system installations and re- 
jected 15. Nine nursing homes were inspected on 
three different occasions. 

Three tuberculosis patients were admitted 
and discharged from hospitals with the town pay- 
ing $-925.64 for their care. This is the lowest 
amount spent for this service for some years. In 
addition, some 22 premature infant babies were 
recorded with 4 of these requiring financial assist- 
ance from the town, costing $1,260.00 This cost 
is shared with the State. 

According to the communicable disease re- 
cords, the incidence of chicken pox this year is 
the highest since 1962 and for measles, the highest 
since 1961. Dog bites have decreased from an all- 
time high of 122 last year to 94 this past year. 



24 



Follow-up work on tubercular patients, con- 
tacts of communicable diseases, premature babies, 
and crippled children was carried out as usual. 

Article X, "Minimum Sanitation Standards 
for Food Service Establishments' has been added 
to the State Sanitary Code. As of January 1, 1966 
no person will be permitted to operate a food ser- 
vice establishment unless he is the holder of a 
valid permit granted to him by the Board of 
Health. Also included under Article X are Vend- 
ing Machines, Mobile Food Servers, Catering 
Establishments, plus the approval of plans for 
new and proposed alterations of all food service 
establishments. 

A Mobile X-ray unit was stationed at the 
Methuen Board of Health office and free chest 
X-rays were available to residents of nearby 
towns. Approximately 200 people from Andover 
were X-rayed there. 

At the annual rabies clinic, conducted by Dr. 



Lindsay, approximately 600 dogs were inoculated. 

With the co-operation of the Andover School 
Department and St. Augustine's School, a survey 
was made of 1st, 6th, and 11th grade pupils in 
order to obtain information on the immunization 
levels of pre-school and school age children in re- 
gard to diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, polio, 
and measles, The results of this program showed 
that 40% of school children have not received any 
booster shots for the above diseases. Any one - 
child or adult - who needs either basic or booster 
immunization should see his family doctor now 
and bring his immunization up to date. 

Due to the severe drought and unusually 
warm summer, the algae growth in Pomps Pond 
was so excessive that it was deemed advisable to 
retain the services of a commercial firm to treat 
the water with an algaecide. This is the first time 
such action was necessary since Pomps Pond has 
been used as a recreation area. 



Communicable Disease Cases Reported 

Animal Bites 


1965 

94 


1964 

122 


1963 

65 


Chicken Pox 


183 


67 


37 


Dysentery, Bacillary 
German Measles 



12 


1 
1130 



32 


Gonorrhea 


1 


1 





Hepatitis, Infectious 
Measles 


3 

210 


4 
46 


5 
5 


Meningitis 

Mumps 

Salmonellosis 




21 




2 

307 

1 


1 

98 



Scarlet Fever 


20 


13 


30 


Syphilis 
Tuberculosis 


1 

4 



1 



4 


Whooping Cough 


1 





1 


1 Hi Z 1 



Animal Inspection 



Personnel 


Part-time 1 


Expenditures 


$600.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


.24 



NUMBER OF CATTLE INSPECTED: 






Begistered 


75 




Grade 


81 


156 


Number of sheep inspected 




13 


Number of horses inspected 




64 


Number of goats inspected 




1 


Number of swine inspected 




996 


Number of barns inspected (dairy) 




8 


Number of dogs quarantined 




82 


Number of dogs with Rabies 







HHHHHBHHHHHHH 



25 



PUBLIC 




Personnel 3 

Expenditures Administration $ 10,406.00 

Assistance $111,945.00 

Monthly Cost Per Person 49<£ 

Public assistance payments in 1965 reached 
a record high of $223,958.90. The average monthly 
case load during the past 12 months was 154 with 
226 persons being given some form of assist- 
ance. The highest number of cases, 170, occurred 
in October ; the lowest case load, 146, occurred in 
May. 

Of the total amount spent, 54.4% or $121,728 
was paid for medical aid, with 85.6% of this 
amount being paid for the care of persons over 
65 years of age. 

Food, shelter, and clothing aid totalled 
$102,231. or 45.6% of the total. 51% of this 
amount was paid for persons over the age of 65. 

Allocations for aid in 1965 were as follows: 
Old Age Assistance 28.3%; Medical Aid to the 
Aged 42.3% ; Aid to Families with Dependent 
Children 16.2%; Disability Assistance 10.1% 
General Relie 2.9%; and Cuban Relief .2%. 
There were 109 applications received and pro- 
cessed for these allocations. 

Recoveries registered $7,460.10. Reimburse- 
ments from the Federal and State governments 
totalling $182,326.70 reduced the cost of public 



VETERANS' 



Personnel 2 

Expenditures Administration $12,032.00 

Assistance $28,828.00 

Monthly Cost Per Person 16«i 



assistance to the Town to $41,632.20 or 18.6%. 
of the total. Total administrative expenses were 
$25,189. with the Town's share of this amount 
$7,118. The balance in administrative expen- 
ses was met by reimbursements from the State 
and Federal governments. 

Mrs. Sara Bolton submitted her resignation 
as a member of the Board of Public Welfare on 
February 1, 1965, at which time Mrs. Milton J. 
Meyers was appointed. In January and in March, 
a Social Case Worker and a replacement Clerk- 
Typist respectively were added to the staff. Emer- 
gency appointments of a Clerk-Typist for a limit- 
ed period of time occurred four times during the 
year in order to catch up on accumulated clerical 
work. 

Welfare expenses promise to continue to in- 
crease sharply in the year ahead. It is important 
for the taxpayers of Andover to realize that, ex- 
cept for the General Relief category, the stand- 
ards of eligibility and the amount of payments 
to recipients of public assistance are established 
by State and Federal authorities. Even the sal- 
aries of departmental personnel are extablished 
by the State with the Town having absolutely no 
voice in their determination. 

Legislation was introduced in the last ses- 
sion of the General Court for the assumption by 
the State of the full cost of Welfare services. It 
appears that the same proposal will be made in 
1966 and perhaps will suffer a kinder fate than 
the 1965 proposal. 



26 




The Veterans' Service Department is opera- 
ted under Chapter 115., General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, for the express 
purpose of providing financial assistance, when 
needed, to war-time veterans, their families, de- 
pendents or survivors because of sickness, old 
age, hospitalization or unemployment, and after 
a full investigation has been made in each indivi- 
dual case. 

During 1965, assistance was provided to 
thirty cases on a permanent status and to eighty 
one cases on a temporary basis. Again, in 1965, 
no assistance was allowed to any applkant whose 
need was occasioned by unemployment. All such 
applicants were placed in jobs or were denied aid 
because of their unwillingness to work. 

Many new developments in public assistance, 
as a result of the liberalization of benefits to low 
income groups on the State and Federal levels, 
have had and will continue to have a profound 
effect on the expenditures of this department. An 
amendment in the Settlement Laws, on the state 
level, will entitle an applicant to assistance from 
the first day of settlement in Andover, where pre- 
viously assistance could be granted only after 
five years of continuous residence. The Legisla- 
ture will soon grant veteran status to men who 
have served in Viet Nam and other combat areas, 
and will open our roles to an ever-increasing num- 
ber of qualified applicants. 

The added expense, as a result of the above 
changes in our laws, will be eased somewhat, if 
the plans to reimburse 100% of all monies spent 



by the Veterans' Departments, now under con- 
sideration by the Legislature, are passed. 

Despite the rising costs of hospitalization 
and medication expenditures in this category 
were less than those of the previous year. The 
implementation of Medicare in July of 1966 
should absorb, on the Federal level, a good por- 
tion of future hospital expense. 

During the year 1965, thirty six Andover 
veterans died. These deaths were recorded as 
follows :- 

Mexican Border 1 

World War One 14 

World War Two 19 

Korean Campaign 2 

More than 1700 individuals were interviewed 

in 1965, and information and assistance given to 

them relative to Veterans Administration benefits, 

such as hospitalization, home loans, pensions, 

compensation, death benefits, grave markers, 

flags, and many other matters too numerous to 

enumerate. 

Pensions and compensation applications, pro- 
cessed by this office through the Veterans Admin- 
istration resulted in awards in excess of $5000.00 
monthly to residents of Andover. 

Sincere thanks are given to the Andover 
Chapter American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, 
all local church groups, veterans organizations, 
the Trustees of the Towle Fund, South Lawrence 
Associates and all other charitable organizations 
who have given their wholehearted support to 
this department during the past year. 




"Lest We Forget" Memorial Day, 1965 



27 




Andover School Department 




Expenditures 


$2,166,862.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


$8.60 


Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 


Technical High School 




Expenditures 


$17,945.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


™ 



The School Department is happy to present 
this report of progress during 1965 as a part of 
the annual Town Report. A more detailed report is 
contained in a separate School Department bro- 
chure avaiable to taxpayers. 

The School Department is continuing to work 
together with the Town to solve mutual problems. 
A temporary bookkeeping machine was rented by 
the Town for school use during 1965. This will be 
discontinued during the coming year, and the 
school system will share in the use of the data 
processing equipment recently installed in the 
Town Hall. This will be highly beneficial for ac- 
counting work in the School Department and may 
be used to provide other computing services. 

During the year, consideration was given to 
the School Department's needs for administrative 
offices. A set of specifications, outlining such needs, 
was transmitted to the Town Manager. With this 
information, it will be possible to determine the 
advantages in locating the school offices in the 
proposed new Town Hall, in a remodeled Jackson 
School, or in other facilities. It is our intention to 
work closely with the Town to arrive at the most 
economical and most feasible plan for centralized 
School Department offices. 

The School Committee also studied a new 
classification and salary policy for non-instruc- 
tional school personnel. Continuing in the phil- 
osophy to cooperate fully with the Town to attain 
equitable treatment of employees, the plan is re- 
ceiving additional study by the administrators and 
the School Committee. 

Some areas of serious overcrowding are oc- 
curring. In the South School, temporary relief has 
been provided by transferring two sixth grade 
classes to the Stowe School. During the year, the 
Superintendent of Schools prepared a set of edu- 
cational specifications for a new elementary school 
in the southern part of Andover. After approval 
by the School Committee, these plans were for- 



warded to the Town Manager on September 30. It 
is the judgement of the Committee that this school 
must be available no later than September 1968 in 
order to prevent excessive overcrowding and thus 
cause an intolerable effect on our educational pro- 
gram. 

The School Committee continues to stress the 
urgent need for acquiring additional sites of land. 
These should be made available and specifically 
designated for the location of future elementary 
schools. We understand that one site in the 
southern part of Andover is presently being ac- 
quired for the next elementary school. Additional 
sites are required in other sections such as - Cross 
Street, Osgood Street, Bailey Road and east of 
Route 125 Bypass. 

A serious overcrowding is occurring in the 
Junior High School. The new high school, pre- 
sently under construction, will provide relief since 
the present Andover High School is to be con- 
verted to a second Junior High School. Our ad- 
ministrators have been working long and hard 
with the architect, with the objective of opening 
this new high school for use in September 1967. 
Meeting this date is absolutely essential if present 
high standards in our educational program are to 
be maintained. 

The School Committee and administrators 
have continued to evaluate and improve our edu- 
cational program. Among the accomplishments 
reached during the past year were : 

(a) Introduction of Spanish as a second 
modern foreign language in our high school 
program. 

(b) Beginning of an enrichment program for 
the academically talented students in the fifth 
and sixth grades. It is expected that this will 
be expanded to other grade levels. 

(c) An Educational Conference, arranged by 
a group of Andover citizens, was held in 
November to inform the community of var- 
ious approaches in education. 

(d) Review by School administrators and 
the School Committee was continued in such 
policy areas as special education, guidance, 
and organizational structure. 

During the year, our Curriculum Coordinator 
and Director of Instruction resigned his position. 
In lieu of continuing this position, the Committee 
has created a new administrative position — As- 
sistant Superintendent in charge of Elementary 



28 



Education. A job description has been prepared, 
qualifications have been established, and recruit- 
ing for this position has been started. It is ex- 
pected that his position will be filled during 1966. 
The School Committee adopted, as part of its 
Rules and Regulations, an article for "Recogni- 
tion and Professional Procedures" with the An- 



dover Teachers' Association. This article formal- 
izes previously used means for communication be- 
tween the Andover Teachers' Association and the 
School Committee. A fine spirit of cooperation is 
displayed by the Teachers' Association and they 
are to be commended for their efforts to increase 
the professional stature of teachers in Andover. 



The school population in Andover continued to increase at about the same rate for 1965. Past 
figures and projections are given below : 





1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


Elementary 


2473 


2580 


2667 


2799 


Junior High School 


913 


1003 


1081 


1088 


High School 


790 


829 


861 


889 


Total 


4176 


4412 


4609 

* Projected 


4776 




Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School - 1965 




Architects Rendering of 1,200 Pupil - Senior High School 



LIBRARY 



Personnel 


Full-time 12 




Part-time 8 


Expenditures 


$119,942.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


48^ 













29 




Crowded but . . . 

The passage of the library building article 
at the March Town Meeting was the single most 
exciting and important event in the 1965 library 
year. 

Immediately thereafter, working drawings 
and bid specifications were prepared as quickly 
as possible so that the library could qualify for an 
$85,000 federal grant. Construction of the addi- 
tion was begun in early September and will, if 
all goes well, be completed by Summer or early 
Fall. 

It became apparent that, because of con- 
struction, the adult library operation must be 
moved to the top floor. This involved many hours 
of planning book and furniture lay-out, and the 
moving and building of shelving for some 10,000 
books. 

Space, also, had to be found for several 
thousand periodicals and lesser used reference 
books when, in the interest of economy, the con- 
tractor took over the basement storeroom as an 
office. Thanks to the generosity of the Brooks 
School and Phillips Academy libraries, space has 
been found for this material for the duration. It 
is available to library users on request. 

Except for a week in October when the 
library was closed to facilitate the move to the 
top floor, adult service has been carried on with- 
out interruption. 

For the convenience of readers, a browsing 
collection of 2000, with books drawn from all sub- 
ject areas, has been introduced. Many readers are 
now discovering books which otherwise they 
might not have come upon. 

With the library operations preempting all 
available top floor space, community groups, or- 
dinarily meeting at the Memorial Hall Library, 
have temporarily had to look elsewhere. The 
children's film program was moved to the Ballard 
Vale Branch Library. Otherwise, library activi- 
ties have gone on much as usual with the Child- 
ren's Room offering hospitality to Story Hours, 
Great Books and Trustees' Meetings. Only the 
annual open house had to be given up. 

Adult circulation at the main library which 
showed a steady gain through September, not sur- 
prisingly plummeted in October, November and 
December so that the earlier gains were prac- 
tically wiped out. A few users have found the long 
climb to the top floor impossible: others, a de- 
terrent to frequent use. 

Circulation as a whole, however, showed a 
gain. Children's Room use continues to increase 
with part of the 1965 gain due to longer hours 



of opening, since, for the first time it has been 
possible to open the room all day on Saturdays 
and during school vacations. 

The use of the elementary school libraries 
is also on the rise reflecting increased school en- 
rollments and stronger school library collections, 
but not increased hours of service due to the li- 
brary's continuing inability to recruit a trained 
full-time school librarian. The library has al- 
ready began recruiting for the next school year 
and hopefully will be successful. 

4260 books were added to the library collec- 
tion in 1965, 22 less than in 1964, a reflection of 
higher book costs. 

The elementary school library collections 
were increased by the addition of 1972 books. 

4124 books, about 6% of the library's total 
holdings were withdrawn because of obsolescence 
or physical condition in a concerted effort to im- 
prove book collections as much as possible prior 
to moving into the new stack area. 

2105 new borrowers were added to the li- 
brary's ranks ; 1470 of them adults, 635 children. 

Although there had to be some improvisation, 
9th grade classes profited by their visits to gain 
practice in locating materials for school assign- 
ments. 23 school classes in all visited the library, 
ranging from pre-school through ninth grade. 27 
story hours were held in 1965 and 28 meetings 
of the popular pre-school groups. Since October, 
story hours have been held on Saturday mornings 
in the Children's Room, not a good time as the 
marked drop in attendance indicates. However, 
when the library resumes normal operation, story 
hours will undoubtedly return to their usual 
popularity. 

140 adult and children's records were pur- 
chased or added by gift. The Futterman Fund 
made a small grant of $90 to the library for re- 
cords in 1965. Total recordings adult and child- 
ren's number 1330. 




"A Woman's Work . . ." Town Manager Richard J. Bowen, Architect 
James Clapp, Contractor Donald Manzelli, Arthur Reynolds Chairman, 
Library Trustees and Miriam Putnam, Librarian. 



30 



448 framed prints were loaned for home 
use, a slight decrease from 1964. Usually each 
year a half dozen new prints are added but be- 
cause of space limitations, none were purchased 
in 1965. 

93 16mm sound films were available for com- 
munity use during the year. 333 film showings 
had a total audience of 20,154 viewers. Fewer film 
strips and slides were borrowed than in 1964. 



A specific sum of money was set aside for 
the first time to buy adult books for the young 
adult collection. 

Between $500 and $600 was spent for the 
purchase of double starred titles on the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science Book 
List for Young Adults in an effort to improve 
the library's science holdings. Since science books 
have a high obsolescence, this must be a con- 
tinuous process. 



1965 


STATISTICS OF LIBRARY 
BOOK STOCK 


USE 






Adult 


Juvenile 


Total 


Volumes at beginning of year 


50,122 


18,290 


68,412 


Volumes added by purchase 


2,942 


1,098 


4,040 


Volumes added by gift 


206 


14 


220 


Lost of withdrawn 


-2,827 


-1,297 


-4,124 




50,443 


18,105 


68,548 


Newspapers and magazines currently received 




226 


Magazines received by gift 


USE 




54 


Adult books and other materials* 




98,764 


Children's books and other materials 








Main Library and Branch 


64,216 






Elementary School Libraries 


58,336 




122,552 




Total Circulation 




221,316 




REGISTRATION 






New Borrowers, 1965 


Adult 


Juvenile 


Total 


Total number of registered 


1,470 


635 


2,105 


borrowers 


5,276 


4,041 


9,317 


Circulation per capita (based on 19( 


55 state census 






figures - 20,551) 






10.8 


* Includes magazines, pamphlets, 


records, mounted pictures, 


film strips, 


slides, framed prints. 


Total number of books in Library 


68,548 




Book Stock 


per capita 


3.3 




Total Circulation 1960 


1965 






170,073 


221,316 




Circulation 


per capita 






(1965 state census, 20,551) 


10.8 





The Business Index was added this past year 
which does for business magazines what the 
Reader's Guide does for general periodicals. A 
book list of reent acquisitions for business men 
was distributed by the Junior and Senior Cham- 
bers of Commerce to their members. 

The Library now subscribes to the New York 
Times Index and, hopefully, before too long, will 
be able to subscribe to The New York Times Mi- 
crofilm edition. 

The book budget fell far short of providing 
enough funds for all the books in all the fields 
which the library can profitably use to meet read- 
ers needs. Because of the construction project and 
the limited adult operating space, the 1966 book 
budget was increased only nominally in order to 
meet price increases. In 1967 it must be sub- 
stantially raised. 

Funds from the John C. Moynihan bequest 
and a gift from the Andover Council of Churches, 
noted in last year's report, enabled the library to 
enrich its literature, philosophy and religious 
collections in a way its own book funds would not 
have premitted. 



Special areas which will receive emphasis in 
1966 purchase are: reference, child care, arts and 
crafts and science. 

Book lists since September have been pro- 
duced on the town multilith. We appreciate the 
cooperation. 

The long overdue redecorating of the Ballard 
Vale Branch Library interior, using lively colors 
to demarcate library functions, was completed 
this fall. The library room should attract new 
users who will find there a continually improving 
book collection. 

There have been a few staff changes. Mrs. 
Isabel Eldridge joined the staff in September as 
Library Assistant. Everett Ward, Custodian for 
more than ten years, retired to accept another 
position. William E. Arnold succeeded him as 
Custodian. 

The professional staff has participated ac- 
tively in library affairs, attending the National 
Conference, state and local meetings and work- 
shops, taking part in cooperative book reviewing, 
serving on community committees. 



31 



The library is grateful to members of the 
Department of Public Works who transported 
books, moved and constructed book shelves; to 
the volunteers of all ages who provided the hu- 
man chain which got the books to their new 
location ; to the Brooks School and Phillips Acad- 
emy libraries for their generous offer of space 
in time of need. 



It appreciates, too, the splendid way in which 
library users and staff alike took inconveniences, 
dust and noise, part of the price of the library 
building, in stride. 



The Library thanks its many friends who 
gave time, money and books. Special thanks go 
to the Andover Evening Study Program for its 
gift of $300 whic hwill be used to buy something 
special for the new addition. 

The Library, as in other years, gratefully 
acknowledges the excellent press coverage given 
its services and activities. 

Andoverians watch the progress of the li- 
brary addition with delight and expectation. By 
this time next year, these expectations should be 
a reality. 



RECREATION 



The aim of the Recreation Department is 
"to make available areas and facilities suitable 
to the leisure time needs of the people of the com- 
munity." Because of the rapid growth of Andover, 
the "Challenge of Change" has been particularly 
applicable to the oeration of the Department 
during 1965. Some of the changes have been 
dramatic and some functional. All areas have 
been changed to meet the increasing need. 

Andover Recreation Park is a 35-acre tract 
located near the geographical center of town with 
its entrance at 175 Abbot Street. The Andover 
Recreation Park Lodge received a new heating 
system a few short days before the start of the 
New Year. Between this, the location, and the 
grounds, it was possible to accommodate over 50 
groups arid several thousand individuals through 
all seasons. 

The Community Improvement Committee of 
the Shawsheen Village Women's Club did much 
to provide changes in the Lodge. Under the lead- 
ership of Mrs. Richard E. Hutchinson, the Com- 
mittee accomplished the sewing of drapes for 




Personnel 


Full-time 2 




Part-time 33 


Expenditures 


$45,080.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


18e 




the main hall windows ; financing the installation 
of a light for outdoor steps ; purchasing a folding 
ping pong table; purchasing some unique games 
for use in the program ; and compiling material 
for a revised Guide to Organizations and Activ- 
ities. These were all done through money raised 
from an auction held in the Area. Other changes 
in the building included the purchase of chairs 
by the Welcome Wagon Newcomers' Club; pur- 
chase of bridge chairs and tables by the Dupli- 
cate Bridge Club ; completion of the paneling and 
staining of walls in the main hall; completion of 
the installation of combination storm windows 
in the main hall; repair of the chimney; repair 
and reconditioning of the main fireplace; and 
sealing the floor of the main hall. 

The Pomps Pond Swimming Area at An- 
dover Recreation Park also underwent dramatic 
changes which included the completion of a new 
entrance road; installation of new swimming 
piers; reconditioning of the guard house; recon- 
ditioning of the first aid room ; installation of an 
outdoor emergency telephone; and algae control 



32 



treatment of the water. 

The main entrance to Andover Recreation 
Park took on a new look with the installation of 
guard posts with reflectorized tape for evening 
use; mulching of banks with wood chips; planting 
of blueberry bushes by Scouts on the bankings; 
start of grading for a field next to Abbot Street. 

General park development included the clear- 
ing of brush and dead trees from wooded areas; 
clearing of fire lanes through the wooded areas; 
construction of a field hockey field for use by the 
High School during its construction period; mul- 
ching of the sliding area to make a smoother 
slope; development of a half court for basket- 
ball; installation of a player bench and small 
grandstand on the softball field. 

Central Playground improvements included 
installation of non-wrap hangers for the swings 
and development of a tetherball court. 

The Ballardvale Playground is located on 
Andover Street across from the Fire Station in 
Ballardvale center. The ground is a little over one 
acre in size. Besides the supervised playground 
program and free play, there is a court which 
is used for ice skating, conditions permitting. 
Changes on the Ballardvale Playground included 
grading and seeding parts of the ground to ex- 
pand the play area; resurfacing the court; and 
painting the building. Basketball backstops have 
been purchased and plans have been made to 
prepare a full basketball court plus other courts in 
the Spring. 

Changes on the Shawsheen Playground in- 
cluded cleaning and grading the ground; install- 
ation of a water bubbler and faucet; starting of 
top dressing in preparation for seeding; and in- 
stallation of a new slide. 

General changes that apply throughout the 



Town included the purchase of a small cycle bar 
mower that was used extensively in all areas 
where there was long grass or difficult mowing; 
installation of the microwave boxes that were 
donated by Western Electric in 1964 and used on 
all playgrounds and by ball leagues at High 
School, Phillips Academy and the Central Play- 
stead; and extended bus service during the sum- 
mer allowed not only additional swimming par- 
ticipation but also increased playground parti- 
cipation. This service made it possible to con- 
duct many more inter-playground activities than 
in the past. 

Program changes were dramatic this year 
because of developments at Andover Recreation 
Park and the extended bus service. Relocation of 
the Easter Candy Hunt to Andover Recreation 
Park from the Park on Chestnut Street resulted 
in almost a tripling of participation at the new 
location over that at the Park. A summer pilot 
program of dramatics proved successful. Children 
from most sections of Town were able to attend 
because of the bus service. Go-Cart enthusiasts 
experimented in using the sewer easement through 
Andover Recreation Park as a safe area away 
from traffic and dangers of hitting neighbor- 
hood children. Soccer enjoyed increased popular- 
ity on most of the playgrounds. Inter-playground 
competition did much to help stimulate this. 

Adult Education courses were held for the 
first time at Andover Recreation Park. These 
courses were sponsored in the evening by the 
Recreation Department and co-sponsored during 
the day with the Y.W.C.A. Courses included 
bridge, sculpturing and rug braiding. Several 
dances were also held in the Lodge. The most suc- 
cessful was a College Student Homecoming Dance 
during the Christmas vacation. 




33 




34 



WATER 



♦"■-'>-.■:-'"> 



mffigm 



HHwamniNM 



Personnel 
Expenditures 



10 
$144,806.00 




Drought conditions continued to plague the 
Town of Andover during 1965 with the problem 
reaching sufficiently serious proportions such as 
to require the imposition of water use restrictions 
in the month of July. These restrictions or what 
more properly may be described as conservation 
measures continue in effect at the writing of this 
report and will probably remain in force well into 
1966. 

Total rainfall deficiency since 1-963 exceeds 
forty (40) inches with 1965 accounting for nearly 
fifteen (15) inches of this figure. Rainfall records 
indicate the past year to have been the lowest since 
1749. Haggett's Pond, the Town's major source of 
supply and storage area was 76.5 inches below 
full as of December 31, 1965. The Pond, in fact, 
has not been at capacity since May of 1964. The 
average daily consumption of 2.36 million gallons 
of water was met in a large part by the Abbot 
and Ballardvale Wells, principally the latter. 

Examination of the accompanying table of 
"watery" facts reveals quite clearly that despite 
the drought and the attendant shortage of water, 
consumer demand continued at a high rate, 
although lower than that of 1964. As a conse- 
quence of this demand which must be met, con- 
struction of an additional source of supply was 
begun in November as authorized by the August 
Special Town Meeting. The Fish Brook project is 
proceeding satisfactorily and should be completed 
in time for the 1966 Spring run-off. The estimated 
safe daily yield of one million gallons of water 
should go far to restoring Haggett's Pond to full 
capacity within the ensuing year. Sight must not 
be lost of the fact that the Pond will require in 
excess of 500 million gallons of water in order 
to reach this level. 

As if to compound the Town's water difficul- 
ties in 1965, one of the wells failed for five (5) 
days during the peak of the dry period. Emergency 



and ultimately permanent repairs restored the 
well to full operation before the problem reached 
serious proportions. 

The new chlorination control at the Prospect 
Hill Reservoir required by the State Department 
• of Health and postponed for several years was 
installed during the year. Installation of water 
mains on Dascomb Road and Cross Street as au- 
thorized by the 1965 Annual Town Meeting was 
effected with only surface restoration and repair 
to be completed in 1966. These projects involved 
some 4,661 feet of 12 inch mains with six (6) 
hydrants and nine (9) gates. Various subdivisions 
added 13,960 feet of pipe, thirty-six (36) hydrants 
and sixty-four (64) gates to the Town's water sys- 
tem. 

Exploration for additional ground water also 
started in 1965 and will be completed by Spring 
of 1-966. The preparation of detailed plans for the 
construction of an enclosed distribution reservoir 
to replace the Bancroft Reservoir will be com- 
pleted with the use of a Federal interest-free loan 
during the next year. This project is of high 
priority and is part of the Town's long-range 
water resource development program. 

Maintenance of the water system required 
205 new service connections, the installation, re- 
pair or removal of 97 hydrants, 88 taps in sub- 
divisions, addition of 12 gates, and the removal 
of 12 services. More than 1,500 calls were required 
in 1965 for special meter readings, leaks and 
breaks, the installation of meters and for other 
similar requests or requirements. 

A study of the Town's water rate schedule 
was undertaken during the year and submitted 
for review and appropriate action by the Town 
Manager. It appears to be quite essential that rates 
be revised upwardly in order to realize revenue 
sufficient to place water operations on a self-sus- 
taining basis. 



35 









^^^>^-^^^,^>^>i i ^' : 



' ; *wJWwswv«**'' 



Annual Pumpage Service 





Water 


All Sources 


Pipes 


Meters 




Miles of 


Year 


Committments 


Million Gals. 


in use 


in use 


Hydrants 


Main Pipe 


1940 


$ 52,241.14 


414,653 


2,653 


2,587 


728 


79.89 


1950 


67,871.62 


546,313 


3,202 


3,172 


815 


91.73 


1960* 


194,880.75 


807,115 


4,418 


4,368 


965 


113.74 


1964 


237,490.36 


•945,501 


5,116 


5,072 


1,084 


128.05 


1965 


$228,025.24 


861,629 


5,321 


5,222 


1,126 


131.56 



Increase in Water Rates - January 2, 1959 approximately 30% 



WATER PUMPING 



Abbot Well 
Ballardvale Wells 
Wood Hill 
Haggett's Pond 
Totals 



1963 

72,150,000 
224,210,000 

69,844,000 
495,560,000 
864,764,000 



1964 

128,810,000 
201,130,000 
84,901,000 
530,660,000 
945,501,000 



1965 

119,000,000 
341,690,000 
91,009,000 
309,930,000 
861„629,000 




Fish Brook Dam Construction November, 1965 



36 



HAGGETT'S POND - 1965 





i2Sw 



^c*«£ 





Parking Meters 



Personnel 
Expenditures 



$10,457.00 



SPRING 



The Town's parking meter system consists of 
some 200 on-and off-street meters. However, it is 
only fair to report that the devices as well as the 
economics of the system leave much to be desired. 
Parking meter revenue has dropped sharply from 
a high of $8,380.51 in 1963 to a low of $6,357.77 
in 1965. This occured despite marked increase in 
the use of metered areas by the ever-increasing 
numbers of downtown shoppers. 

In response to this situation, enforcement 
practices have been sharpened. The Town parking 
lot was marked off and has increased its capacity. 
A new motor scooter was acquired to permit the 
enforcement officer to check on meters more often. 
Maintenance of meters has been somewhat im- 
proved although the age and general condition of 
many meters precludes their being placed in com- 
pletely workable order. The Board of Selectmen 
directed that the Town Manager confer with 
several parking meter manufacturers to enlist 
their assistance and technical guidance in plac- 
ing the Town's meter operations on both physic- 
ally and fiscally sound bases. It is anticipated that 
several surveys at no cost to the Town will be 
completed early in 1966. 

It is quite clear that one answer to the Town's 
parking problem can be found in improving the 
condition of existing parking through enforce- 
ment and maintenance. This can be accomplished 
without placing a burden upon the Town's tax- 
payers, inconveniencing users or penalizing busi- 
ness establishment. The Andover Chamber of 
Commerce has indicated its support to put the 
system on a paying basis through the above as 
well as an increase in meter fees. The objective 
of the Town administration will be to earmark all 
receipts for operation of the system and the ac- 
quisition of additional off-street parking spaces. 
This is a major goal for the Town and its flourish- 
ing economy. 




CEMETERY 



Personnel 


5 


Expenditures 


$32,980.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


13^ 



Parking Meter Enforcement Improves. 



During the year, 45 new lots were sold at 
Spring Grove Cemetery. There were also 75 in- 
terments which is 8 less than in 1964. A total of 
$6,405.00 was received from the sale of new lots, 
interments, vault sales, foundation installations, 
and from the care of lots not under prepetual 
care. 

From the perpetual care payments and irom 
payments made on three old lots not previously 
under perpetual care, a total of $6,508.00 was 
turned over to the Town for addition to the Per- 
petual Care Fund. This fund now totals $164,300. 

Interest income from the Perpetual Care 
Fund of $6,367.42 added to the income from sales 
reduced the actual cost of cemetery operations to 
the Town by a total of $12,772.42. 

Several noteworthy occurrences marked the 
year 1965 as a significant one. Due to rising ex- 
penses and as a partial step in making the ceme- 
tery somewhat more self-sufficient, the Cemetery 
Trustees revised upwardly the service charges 
and sale prices of lots effective June 1st. This has 
meant an increase in the amount being turned 
over to the Town as well as strengthening the 
Perpetual Care Fund. A major project of the 
year was the installation of 3,853 ft. of bitumin- 
ous concrete on roadways in the cemetery. This 
is part of a two-year rehabilitation program 
which should be completed in 1966. A new front- 
end loader with a backhoe attachment was also 
acquired. This unit has aided materially in devel- 
oping a more aggressive cemetery maintenance 
program. A restroom facility was added to the 
cemetery garage and both the interior and ex- 
terior of the building were painted. 

Plans are presently being made for continua- 
tion of the maintenance program and will include 
the clearing of ground in newer areas of the ceme- 
tery property, replacement of damaged curbing, 
and the enrichment of soil in the older portions 
of the cemeterv. 



UNCLASSIFIED 



North Andover and Andover approach to 
reduction of pollution in the Merrimack 
River. Mr. Richard Young, Executive 
Director, of the Commission attends and 
participates in meetings of pollution 
abatement representatives of the four 
communities. 



During calendar year 1-965, the Building 
Committee held 37 meetings in continuing its 
drive to provide new secondary school facilities 
for the school year beginning September 1967. 

No meetings were held during most of Jan- 
uary/February while the architects and school 
department personnel developed plans for the 
new high school, The original set of plans were 
not accepted by the State Building Assistance 
Commission and had to be re-drawn. In March 
the State approved preliminary drawings with 
final approval made in early May. 

Site development was of prime importance 
and bids were received and awarded to Brox 
Brothers. Work was completed in early December, 
Mo-Del Company has been awarded the loaming 
and seeding contract. The site work has been in- 
spected and approved by this committee and final 
costs show a savings of some $60,000.00 from 
the estimated costs. 

Working drawings for the building will be 
put out for bid in January and construction of the 
building should begin in March. 

Perhaps the most important single decision 
involved the installation of electric heating rather 
than oil, to be accomplished at considerable sav- 
ings and convenience to the Town and school per- 
sonnel. We believe this is a sound decision which 
will be borne out in the future. 

At this writing, all phases of the project are 
moving along smoothly and our target date of 
September 1967 should be met. 



CENT. MER. VAL. REG. PLAN. DIST. COM 

The present Andover member of the CMVHPDC 
hereinafter referred to as the Commission at- 
tended his first meeting after appointment on 
September 23, 1965. 

The major efforts of the Commission for the final 
four months of 1965 were devoted to the follow- 
ing: 

A. Further implementation of the Commis- 
sion's action voted in April, 1964 to pro- 
mote a combined Lawrence, Methuen, 



B. Expansion of the Commission members' 
participation in regional affairs by a re- 
solution to include the participation, as 
well as that of Mr. Young, in member 
town and city meetings involving re- 
gional affairs. 

C. Major relignment of the Commission's 
modus operandi in the direction of ex- 
pansion of the Commission staff to include 
a senior planner and utilization of the 
Commission staff in place of hired plan- 
ning groups as much as possible. 

D. A change of emphasis from long time 
studies which have become dated before 
utilization to shorter term surveys on : 

1. Refuse Study - includes a survey on how 
the four communities dispose of refuse 
now, costs involved, future possible sites 
and possibilities for an inter-community 
program. 

2. Water Supply Study - provides for the 
use of an outside consultant to provide 
Commission with a report containing 
alternative estimates of construction 
and operating costs of regional and local 
solutions to the water supply problem. 

E. Inclusion of other pertinent regional study 
and survey subjects such as: 

Wet Lands and Flood Plains Study Indus- 
trial Development Study Parking Studies. 

F. Utilization of the Commission staff to pro- 
vide materials for educational purposes 
and to provide personnel at meetings and 
conferences at which the prepared ma- 
terials will be discussed. 

The Commission is ready to extend its expanded 
capability to additional four-member community 
problems as they may arise and as the member 
communities may, individually or collectively, re- 
quest the Commission's cooperation. 




United States Internal Revenue Service Center, Lowell Street. 



39 



Housing Authority 

The Andover Veterans Housing Project has 
been occupied since October 1950; the Elderly 
Housing Project since September 1959. 

Of the 1,187 elderly persons living in the 
Town of Andover, 10% are in need of housing 
aid. Realizing that additional Housing for the 
Elderly is needed, the Housing Authority and the 
Department of Commerce and Development, 
Division of Housing, have examined two sites, 
one of which has been tentatively approved by 
the Department of Commerce and Development, 
Division of Housing. 

One new member, John B. White, Jr., was 
elected by the Townspeople this year for a term 
of five years. David MacDonald, Jr. left the Au- 
thority after serving on the Board for five years. 

Major repairs this year, at the Veterans 
Project, included : renewing part of underground 
steam return pipe $2,070.00; other heating sys- 
tem repairs $1,135.00. 
VETERANS PROJECT 

Seven new tenants moved into the project 
and one tenant moved within the project during 
the year. 

Payment to the Town of Andover in lieu of 
taxes, for the year 1965, was $1,876.00. 

The Commonwealth Contribution for the fis- 
cal year was $8,650.00. The project showed a 
surplus, for the fiscal year, of $9,631.64. 

The annual income limits for admittance to 
the project are: for families with one or less 
minor dependent, $4,800; two minor dependents, 



$5,000; three or more minor dependents, $5,200. 

Income allowed for continued occupancy : for 
one or less minor dependent, $5,500; two minor 
dependents, $5,700 ; three or more minor depend- 
ents, $5,900. 

Minimum shelter rent for two and three 
bedroom apartments is $40.00 per month; $45.00 
per month for four-bedroom apartments. 

The average monthly shelter rent is $52.32. 
The average monthly utility cost is $18.68. 
ELDERLY HOUSING PROJECT 

Three new tenants have moved into the pro- 
ject and two tenants moved within the project 
during the year. 

The yearly income limits for admission are: 
for one person, 65 years of age or older, $2,500; 
two persons, 65 years of age or older, $3,000. 

It cost $34,266.05 to operate the Elderly 
Housing Project for the year 1965. Of this 
amount, $18,000.00 went to pay the Debt Service, 
$7,422.38 for utilities, $3,123.00 was accrued for 
Reserves, $727.99 for Insurance and Pension 
Fund, $4,992.68 for wages, supplies, contractual 
services, etc. 

The average monthly shelter rent was $37.20 
and $13.18 was charged for utilities. 

With $11,125.00 State Aid, the Project show- 
ed a surplus of $3,079.03. 

Balance sheets, reporting the assets and 
liabilities of Projects 200-1 (Veterans) and 667-1 
(Elderly), for the period ending December 31, 
1965, are attached. 



RETIREMENT 




Personnel 


Part-time 2 


Expenditures 


$96,288.00 


Monthly Cost Per Person 


38$ 



INSURANCE 
Expenditures 
Monthly Cost Per Person 



$49,970.00 
20$ 



DEBT. SERVICE 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$443,759.00 
$1.76 




40 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ASSETS 



Balance Sheet - December 31, 1965 
GENERAL ACCOUNTS 

LIABILITIES 



Cash: 
General 
Sewer Project 

Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes: 

Levy of 1960: 
Pers . Property 148.20 
Real Estate 424.45 

Levy of 1961: 
Pers. Property 57.20 
Real Estate 691.60 

Levy of 1962: 
Pers. Property 78.00 
Real Estate 309.40 

Levy of 1963: 
Pers. Property 2,393.01 
Real Estate 928.33 

Levy of 1964: 
Pers. Property 1,925.47 
Real Estate 17,175.17 

Levy of 1965: 
Pers. Property 4,362.20 
Real Estate 113,097.37 



$1,998,771.29 
77,060.22 



141,590.40 



Employees' Payroll Deductions: 
Federal Taxes 29,982.81 
State Taxes 3,889.38 
Purchase of Savings 

Bonds 1,242.56 

Blue Cross and Blue 

Shield 341.26 

Group Life Insurance 30.18 
United Fund 10.00 

Guarantee Deposits: 

Highway 3,513.00 

Gravel Pits 5,000.00 

Bid Security 2,400.00 

Agency: 
Trust Fund 

Chap. 782 - 1962 404.94 
Chap. 822 - 1963 2,195.40 
Cemetery Perpetual 

Care Funds 420.00 

Machinery Account 406 . 10 



Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise: 



Levy of 
Levy of 
Levy of 
Levy of 
Levy of 
Levy of 
Levy of 
Levy of 
Levy of 



1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 



147.44 
141.60 
171.64 

,640.49 
688.58 

,795.53 
441.20 
537.58 



31,607.67 



Farm Animal Excise: 
Levy of 1965 



132.00 



Special As 

Sewer: 

Unapport 

Added to 

Levy of 

Levy of 

Water: 

Unapport 

Added to 

Levy of 

Levy of 

Committed 

Levy of 

Levy of 

Levy of 

Tax Titles 
Tax Title 
Tax Posse 



sessments: 



ioned 247,274.54 
Taxes: 

1963 32.57 
1965 199.56 



ioned 
Taxes: 
1963 
1965 

Interest 
1963 
1964 
1965 

and Posses 
s 13, 
ssions 11, 



11,302.60 



56.10 
247.86 

11.24 

5.20 

250.08 

sions: 
364.21 
990.53 



Tailings : 
Unclaimed Checks, etc. 

Trust Fund Income: 
W. L. Raymond Welfare 

Federal Grants: 
Disability Assistance: 
Administration 2,299.39 
Assistance 771.72 

50,171.73 Aid to Dependent Children: 
Administration 2,525.21 
Aid 3,239.62 

132.00 Old Age Assistance: 

Administration 3,588.94 
Assistance 3,171.68 
Medical Assistance for Aged: 
Administration 2,572.67 
Assistance 13,651.06 
Cuban Refugee 
Program 612.30 

Federal Grants: 

National Defense Education Act: 
Title III 3,722.21 

Title V 81.48 

Hughes-Barden Fund 600.00 

State Aid to Libraries 



259,379.75 



25,354.74 



Revolving Funds: 
School Lunch 28,156.10 
Andover Athletic 
Association 6,719.89 



35,496.19 



10,913.00 



3,426.44 



539.89 



281.56 



32,422.59 



4,403.69 
4,283.50 



34,875.99 



41 



Departmental: 



Fire Ambulance 




656 


.00 


Sewer 




800 


.75 


School 


2 


,051 


.80 


State Grants: 








Aid to Dep . Children: 




Administration 


403 


.52 


Assistance 


8 


,914 


.58 


Disability Assistance: 




Administration 


63 


.21 


Assistance 


1 


278 


53 


Old Age Assistance 






Administration 


294 


.98 


Assistance 


2 


753 


32 


Medical Assistance 






to Aged: 








Administration 


431 


26 


Assistance 


8 


028 


39 


Veterans ' Services 


142 


99 


Water: 








Rates 


45 


712 


85 


Services 


3 


354 


60 


Liens Added to 








Taxes : 








Levy of 1959 




185 


24 


Levy of 1960 




123 


23 


Levy of 1962 




38 


45 


Levy of 1963 




85 


30 


Levy of 1964 




299 


71 


Levy of 1965 




323 


29 


Aid to Highways: 








State 


7 


544 


60 


County 


3 


772 


30 


Loans Authorized: 








School (Sanborn) 


15 


000 


00 


School (High) 3, 


910 


000 


00 


Rogers Brook 








Art. 48 - 1960 


20 


000 


00 


Rogers Brook 








Art. 8 - 1964 


125 


000 


00 


Library 








Art. 11 - 1965 


234 


000 


00 


D.P.W. Garage 


125 


000 


00 


Town Hall 


550 


000 


00 


Police Station 


150 


000 


00 


Fire Station 


125 


000 


00 


Fish Brook Project 






Art. 6 - 1965 1,000 


000 


00 



Unprovided For or Overdrawn 
Accounts : 
Underestimates : 
Overlay 1964 



25,819.33 



Appropriation Balances 718,035.95 

Sewer Project APW Mass. 46G 58,580.28 

Loans Authorized and Unissued 6,254,000.00 

Sale of Real Estate Fund 6,364.15 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 7,415.00 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 
Parking Meters 4,444.82 
Off-Street 
Parking Meters 2,016.10 6,460.92 

Old Age Assistance Recoveries 1,465.80 

Overlay Surplus 43,755.66 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 
Levy of 1960 572.65 

Levy of 1961 748.80 

Levy of 1963 3,321.34 
Levy of 1965 46,300.84 50,943.63 

State Parks and Reservations 1,030.46 

County Tax 5,725.75 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected 
50,122.67 Motor Vehicle and 

Trailer Excise 50,171.73 

Farm Animal Excise 132.00 

Special Assess- 

11,316.90 ments 

Tax Titles and 

Possessions 
Departmental 
Water 
Aid to Highways 



259,379.75 

25,354.74 
25,765.33 
50,122.67 
11,316.90 



Surplus Revenue 



Interest on Invested Funds 
Sewer Project APW 46G 

Accounts Receivable Charged 
Not Recorded 



422,243.12 
1,173,851.42 

18,479.94 

54.00 



6,254,000.00 



1,329.90 
$8,895,048.93 



$8,895,048.93 



42 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT FUNDS 

Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash and Securities: 
In Custody of Treasurer $ 644,301.98 In Custody of Treasurer: 

Welfare Funds: 

In Custody of Trustees 207,780.85 Emily F. Raymond $ 1,500.00 

Walter Landor Raymond 8,540.13 

David & Lucy Hayward Shaw 10,874.11 

Edward Taylor Fuel 209.09 
Village Improvement Funds: 

Emeline S. Lincoln 1,845.39 

Emma J. Lincoln 1,004.81 
School Funds: 

Dr. Edward C. Conroy 312.34 

Draper 1,554.21 

Holt 115.13 
Alfred V. Lincoln Spelling Bee 662.13 

Varnum Lincoln Spelling Bee 662.13 

Rafton Science Prize 966.49 

Warren Richardson 1,618.18 
U. S. Constitution - Andover 

Post #48 American Legion 216.22 
Library Funds: 

Kate Adams Swift Memorial 282.32 
Park Fund: 

Andover Tennis Court 971.97 
Cemetery Funds: 
Isaac E. Giddings - Burial 

Ground 1,704.24 

Abbie M. Smart, Special 1,567.46 
Special Flower Funds: 

William A. Allen 222.58 

Mary E. Farrington 628.02 

Perpetual Care 193,271.34 
Investment Fund: 

Post-War Rehabilitation 30,313.93 

Stabilization Fund 32,874.27 

Towle Fund 348,692.41 

Cemetery Flower Fds . Principal 3,450.00 

Cemetery Flower Fds. Interest 243.08 

644,301.98 

In Custody of Trustees: 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 7,236.82 
Punchard Free School Funds: 

Principal 79,193.15 

Barnard Fund 1,036.62 

Henry W. & Mabel Barnard 1,105.03 

Alice M. Bell Fund 1,024.94 

Edna G. Chapin 2,312.41 

Draper 1,488.65 

Goldsmith 359.89 
Elizabeth T. Gutterson 

Scholarship 1,025.25 

M. E. Gutterson Botany Prize 343.36 

Reserve 11,446.06 

Memorial Hall Library Fund 101,208.67 

207,780.85 



$ 852,082.83 $ 852,082.83 



43 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 

Apportioned Assessments Apportioned Sewer Assessment 

Not Due: Revenue Due in 1966 to 1982 

Sewer $ 41,580.90 Inclusive $ 41,580.90 

Water 11,295.24 

Apportioned Water Assessment 

Suspended Assessments: Revenue Due in 1966 to 1983 

Sewer 3,728.04 Inclusive 11,295.24 

Suspended Sewer Assessment 
Revenue 3,728.04 



$ 56,604.18 $ 56,604.18 

DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded & Fixed Debt $3,280,000.00 Article 1, 1951, 

Elementary School $ 50,000.00 

Article 10, 1955, High 

School 1,000,000.00 

Article 1, 1957, South 

School 480,000.00 

Article 24, 1961, Sanborn 

School 625,000.00 

Article 1, 1957, Ballardvale 

& Abbot Wells 105,000.00 

Article 14, 1960, Sewer Trunk 

Line 150,000.00 

Article 48, 1960, Rogers 

Brook 105,000.00 
Article 1, 1963, Sewer 
Project, APW, 46G 765,000.00 

$3,280,000.00 $3,280,000.00 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD fc COAL FUND 

Andover Savings Bank, Andover $1,000.00 

Essex Savings Bank, Lawrence 1,000.00 

Broadway Saving's Bank, Lawrence 1,000.00 

City Inst, for Savings, Lowell 1,000.00 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell 1,000.00 

$5,000.00 

Balance, January 1, 1965 $2,261.40 

Interest received, 1965 208 . 75 

$2,470.15 
Expenditures : 
3/9/65 Cross Coal Co. $ 83.33 
3/9/65 Schlott Oil " 100.00 
4/1/65 Lawrence Gas " 50.00 233.33 

Balance, December 31, 1965 $2,236.82 



44 



RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 
Year Ending December 31, 1965 



Income Tax $ 

Corporation Taxes 

Reimbursement - Loss of Taxes 

Meals Taxes 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer 
Excise Taxes: 

Current Year $ 460,937.15 
Previous Years 69,144.90 

Licenses : 

Dog 444.25 

Liquor 8,775.00 

Marriage 366.00 

Miscellaneous 1 , 259 . 00 

Fines 

Special Assessments: 
Unappor t ioned 

Sewer 90,887.23 

Apportioned Sewer 

Paid in Advance 1,821.35 
Apportioned 

Sewer Added: 

Current Year 4,933.89 

Previous Years 280 . 91 
Unapport ioned 

Water 1,837.56 

Apportioned Water 

Paid in Advance 4,795.38 
Apportioned Water 

Added: 

Current Year 1,000.58 

Previous Years 340.34 



General Govt . : 
Rent - Town 
Property 
Town Clerk's 

Misc . Fees 
Miscellaneous 



2,200.00 

1,643.80 
6,612.87 



Protection of Persons 
and Property: 

Ambulance Fees 745.00 

Building Inspector 9,262.00 

1,129.00 
386.50 



Wire Inspector 
Gas Permits 
Septic Tank 

Permits 
Miscellaneous 



1,030.00 
670.41 



Health and Sanitation: 
Plumbing Inspector 2,299.00 
Sewer Installa- 
tions 36.00 
Reimbursements - 
State 498.00 



73,295.10 Highways: 

Snow Removal 
247,075.25 - State $ 503.50 
Supervision of 
2,166.42 Tree Trimming 2,970 .00 

5,637.72 Charities: 

Aid to Dependent 

Children - State 6,058.06 
Disability Assist- 
ance - State 6,338.86 
530,082.05 General Relief - 

State 139.66 



Old Age Assistance: 
Old Age Assistance 

- State 13,141.94 

Medical Assistance 

to Aged - State 24,626.83 



10,844.25 



1,219.00 



105,897.24 



10,456.67 



Veterans' Services: 
Reimbursements - 

State 6,879.15 

Reimbursements - 

Individuals 170.00 
Miscellaneous 9.80 

School: 

Summer School 
Tuition 6,584.00 

Other Tuition 1,184.66 

School Aid - 
Chaps. 69 - 71 221,383.96 

Tuition & Trans- 
portation-State 71,344.32 

Vocational Edu- 
cation - State 3,480.10 

Rentals & Other 2,463.61 

Libraries : 
Fines and Sales 

Recreation: 
Self -Supporting Programs 

Public Service Enterprises: 



Water Rates 
Water Services 
Liens Added to 
Taxes : 

Current Year 
Previous Years 



207,587.85 
12,790.51 



1,359.10 
949.24 



Cemeteries : 

13,222.91 Care of Lots 252.00 

Foundations 865.35 

Tombs & Interments 3,741.50 

Miscellaneous 270.75 

Interest : 

Committed 2,714.04 

2,833.00 Treasury Bills 1,726.70 



3,473.50 



12,536.58 



37,768.77 



7,058.95 



282,157.65 
4,637.66 
1,238.61 



222,686.70 



5,129.60 



45 



Interest : (Cont . ) 
Certificates of 

Deposit $ 9,417.18 
Savings Accounts 9,090.20 
Taxes and Assess- 
ments 5,594.96 
Tax Titles 15 .46 

State Assistance for School 
Const., Chap. 645 - 1948 

Farm Animal Excise Taxes: 
Current Year 550.51 
Previous Years 63 . 88 

Andover Housing Authority - 
Lieu of Taxes 



RECEIPTS NOT INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTI- 
MATES - Year Ending December 31, 1965 



28,558 
99,388 



Tax Title Redemptions 
Tax Title Costs 
Dog Funds - Care and Custody 
54 Chap. 90 - State Aid 
Chap. 90 - County Aid 
Sale of Equipment 
99 Compensation for Collecting 
State Withholding Taxes 
Insurance Claims 
Unidentified Cash 
614.39 Refunds - Departmental 

Reimbursements - Departmental 
Petty Cash Refunds 
1,876.00 Miscellaneous 

State Aid for Abatements to 
Paraplegic Veterans 



$1,734,138.55 



AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS - Year Ending December 31, 1965 



60 
99 



10 
50 

00 



Taxes : 
Personal Property: 

Current Year $ 

Previous Years 
Real Estate: 

Current Year > 

Previous Years 
Dog Licenses from County 
Dog Licenses to County 
N. D. E. A. Title III 
N. D. E. A. Title V 
State Aid to Public Libraries 
State Aid to Library 

Construction 
Parking Meters 
Off-street Parking Meters 
Sale of Dogs 
Public Welfare: 
Federal Grants: 

A.D.C. - Administration 

A.D.C. - Assistance 

- Administration 1, 

- Assistance 9. 
Administration 3, 
Assistance 
Administration 
Assistance 

Aid to Cuban Refugees 
Reimbursements : 
A.D.C. - Assistance 3,682.85 



D.A. 
D.A. 
O.A.A. 
O.A.A. 

M.A.A. 
M.A.A. 



162,737 
1,694 

332,341 
106,762 
2,346 
3,655 
3,722 
746 
4,283 

21,250 

6,357 

1,036 

33 



5,249 

16,902 

349 

821 

641 

37,671 

3,348 

47,409 

535 



Reimbursements: (Cont.) 
D.A. - Assistance $ 
M.A.A. - Assistance 

Old Age Assistance Recoveries 
School Cafeterias 
34 School Cafeterias - State Aid 
31 Andover Athletic Association 
61 Cemetery Sale of Lots 
75 Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
21 Interest: 

Flower Funds 

W . L . Raymond Fund 

Spring Grove Cemetery Funds 

Trust and Investment Funds 
77 Revenue Anticipation Loans 
23 Bond Anticipation Loans 
00 Transfer from Stabilization 

Fund 
Payroll Deductions: 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 

Group Insurance 

Savings Bonds 

United Fund 

Withholding Taxes - Federal 

Withholding Taxes - State 
64 Deposits Held in Escrow 
33 Hughes - Barden Fund 
20 — 



51 
50 
82 
00 
59 
25 



$ 402.57 

21.45 

135.00 

31,171.91 

15,585.96 

110.50 

244.20 

1,544.30 

25.57 

9,762.36 

451.00 
1,115.00 
9,186.44 

3,125.20 

$72,881.46 



82.25 

131.20 

4,795.80 

150,992.10 

51,612.53 

10,138.00 

1,221.00 

6,652.75 

211.00 

1,000.00 

7,057.41 

1,533.34 

500,000.00 

500,000.00 

100,000.00 

37,964.62 

4,672.58 

28,397.46 

882.50 

359,929.98 

45,062.33 

7,400.00 

600.00 



$5,596,915.95 



RECAPITULATION 
Receipts Included in Assessors' Estimates 
Receipts Not Included in Assessors' Estimates 
Agency and Revenue Accounts 



$1,734,138.55 

72,881.46 

5,596,915.95 

$7,403,935.96 



46 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
EXPENDITURES 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1965 



Town Manager 

Salaries & Wages 

Office Salaries 

Expenses 
Selectmen 

Office Salaries 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Board of Appeals 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Treasurer 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Accountant 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Tax Collector 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Assessors 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Planning Board 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Town Clerk 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Elections & Registrations 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Municipal Buildings 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Finance Committee 

Expenses 
Moderator 

Salaries & Wages 
Town Counsel 

Retainer Fee 

Special Cases 
Police Department 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Police Parking Meters 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Fire Department 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 



Balance 
1/1/65 


Appropri- 
ations & 
Transfers 


Expendi- 
tures 


Transfers 

to 
Revenue 


Balance 
Reserved 
for 1966 




12,750.00 
6,842.00 
6,650.00 


12,749.88 
6,582.89 
6,278.48 




.12 
259.11 
371.52 






600.00 

2,100.00 

975.00 


599.82 

2,100.00 

888.79 




.18 
86.21 






924.00 
600.00 


874.76 
413.67 




49.24 
186.33 






14,955.00 
2,155.00 


14,827.48 
1,317.93 




127.52 
837.07 






17,139.00 
990.00 


16,886.12 
648.60 




252.88 
321.40 


20.00 




17,283.00 
2,455.00 


16,047.24 
1,159.85 


1 
1 


,235.76 
,295.15 






22,566.00 
6,920.00 


21,561.43 
5,704.50 


1 


,004.57 
765.50 


450.00 




5,231.00 
6,340.00 


5,021.07 
5,574.36 




209.93 
765.64 






11,988.00 
1,656.00 


11,699.80 
1,190.80 




288.20 
465.20 






7,441.00 
8,350.00 


7,001.99 
4,690.06 


3 


439.01 
,659.94 






7,108.00 
16,400.45 


6,623.35 
14,654.69 




484.65 
254.06 


1,491.70 




900.00 


853.18 




46.82 






100.00 


75.00 




25.00 






3,000.00 
5,850.20 


3,000.00 
4,293.53 


1 


,556.67 






219,311.00 
34,250.00 


212,989.09 
30,225.06 


6 
2 


,321.91 
,917.44 


1,107.50 




6,148.00 
4,645.00 


6,147.78 
4,309.13 




.22 
335.87 






282,178.00 
51,540.00 


278,253.66 
19,915.74 


3 
1 


,924.34 
,969.26 


29,655.00 



47 



Animal Inspector 

Salary 
Building Inspector 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Civil Defense 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Dog Officer 

Salary 

Fees 
Sealer of Weights 
and Measures 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Wire Inspector 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Dutch Elm Department 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Insect Pest Control 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Tree Department 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Public Dump 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Health Department 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Sewer Department 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Sidewalk Construction 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Highways 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Trucks and Garage 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Snow and Sanding 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

New Equipment 
Street Lighting 

Expense 
Veterans' Services 

Salaries & Wages 

Administration Expense 

Benefit Expense 
Memorial Hall Library 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Recreation 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 



Balance 
1/1/65 


Appropri- 
ations & 
Transfers 


Expendi- 
tures 


Transfers 

to 
Revenue 


Balance 
Reserved 
for 1966 




600.00 


600.00 










10,631.00 
1,665.00 


10,611.73 
1,474.55 




19.27 
190.45 






750.00 
1,900.00 


750.00 
1,135.67 




589.33 


175.00 




600.00 
400.00 


600.00 
60.00 




340.00 






1,375.00 
535.00 


1,375.00 
481.83 




53.17 






3,437.00 
589.00 


3,437.00 
589.00 










11,689.00 
6,075.00 


11,243.87 
5,093.70 




445.13 
981.30 






7,836.00 
2,650.00 


7,835.44 
1,863.91 




.56 
671.09 


115.00 




16,564.00 
8,550.00 


16,502.73 
7,813.32 




61.27 
736.68 






7,848.00 
7,500.00 


7,847.65 
6,019.31 


1 


.35 
,480.69 






15,316.00 
11,465.00 


15,059.78 
4,920.41 


6 


256.22 
, 544 . 59 






14,202.00 
13,950.00 


12,554.03 
9,950.02 


1 
3 


,647.97 
,999.98 






6,776.00 
4,717.00 


6,716.30 
2,884.90 


1 


59.70 
,832.10 






83,369.00 
59,900.00 


82,863.30 
43,511.19 


16 


505.70 
,362.56 


26.25 




12,959.00 
37,348.00 


12,546.28 
34,125.64 


3 


412.72 
,202.31 


20.05 




24,233.00 

37,725.00 

2,050.00 


12,172.35 

34,935.43 

2,050.00 


12 
2 


,060.65 
,656.58 


132.99 




39,500.00 


39,467.46 




32.54 






10,537.00 

1,890.00 

33,238.50 


10,502.16 

1,529.93 

28,827.59 


4 


34.84 
360.07 
410.91 






93,946.00 
31,656.61 


91,138.30 
28,803.67 


2 
2 


807.70 
852.94 






36,575.00 
12,988.00 


33,182.63 
11,897.79 


3 

1 


392.37 
090.21 





48 



Balance 
1/1/65 



Appropri- 
ations & 
Transfers 



Expendi- 
tures 



Transfers 

to 
Revenue 



Balance 
Reserved 
for 1966 



B 1 ue Cross - Blue Shield 

School Share 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield 

Town Share 
Building, Car Insurance 
Damage to Persons and Property 
Garbage Collection 
Greater Lawrence 

Vocational High School 
Group Life Insurance 

School Share 
Group Life Insurance 

Town Share 
Industrial Development 
Commission 
Patriotic Holidays 
Retirement 
State Census 
Town Employee Pins 
Veterans ' Headquarters 
Equipment Outlay 
Accounting Machine Rental 
Cemetery Backhoe 
Tree Department Chipper 
Fire Alarm System 
Lighting Improvement Program 
Off-Set Printing Machine 
Physical Plant - Recreation 
Tax Collector - Remittance 

Machine 
Highway - Sand Spreader 
School Bookkeeping Machine 

Rental 
Public Welfare Town 
Administration 

Salaries 

Expenses 
Public Welfare Town 
Benefit 

Expenses 
Aid to Cuban Refugees 
Aid to Dependent 
Children 

Aid 

Administration 
Disability Assistance 

Aid 

Administration 
Medical Assistance 
for Aged 

Aid 

Administration 
Old Age Assistance 

Aid 

Administration 
School Department 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Summer School 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 



17,400.00 



16,928.57 



478 



18 

50 

5 

30 

17 

2 



2 

1 

96 

1 

3 

61 

4 

5 

6 

18 

10 

3 

2 

4 
2 



000.00 
000.00 
200.00 
000.00 

945.00 

600.00 

000.00 

800.00 
925.00 
288.00 
800.00 
600.00 
200.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
500.00 
000.00 
000.00 
500.00 
600.00 

000.00 
500.00 

700.00 



778.00 
665.00 



15 

49 

4 

27 

17 

2 



1 

1 
96 

1 



048.55 
969.79 
626.20 
986.01 

944.58 

506.50 

809.90 

207.61 
397.47 
288.00 
122.30 
600.00 
410.00 

657.83 
851.00 
126.20 



430.80 
432.50 



500.00 
605.00 



778.00 
628.00 



111,944.85 111,944.85 
50 535.20 401.40 



471.43 

2,951.45 

30.21 

573.80 

2,013.99 

.42 

93.50 

190.10 

1,592.39 
527.53 

677.70 

790.00 

61,000.00 

1,014.63 

149.00 

3,373.80 

18,000.00 

10,000.00 

69.20 

167.50 

45.00 



95.00 



37.00 



1 


790 


71 


20 


585 


35 


19 


136 


44 






1 


824 


89 


5 


249 


51 


4 


549 


19 






1 


016 
949 


32 
57 


9 
1 


903 
349 


25 
82 


10 


147 


85 






2 


624 


.68 


47 


883 


83 


36 


857 


45 






1 


434 


17 


3 


348 


64 


2 


210 


14 






3 


497 


45 


39 


542 


52 


39 


878 


29 






2 


595 


.96 


3 


641 


59 


2 


648 


61 










1 


,833 


380 


00 1 


,811 


537 


99 


21,842 


01 








359 


793 


00 


355 


324 


40 


4,468 


60 








7 


900 


00 


7 


539 


68 


360 


32 










500 


00 




481 


13 


18 


87 



2,327.54 



3,955.00 



612.30 



3,239.62 
2,525.21 

771.72 
2,299.39 



13,651.06 
2,572.67 

3,161.68 
3,588.94 



49 



School Cafeterias 
Vocational Education 
School Athletics 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Andover Athletic 

Association 
Greater Lawrence 
Guidance Clinic 
High School Building 

Committee Test Borings 
N. D. E. A. Title III 
Special Acct . for Study 
& Preliminary Plans for 
Sec. Sch. Exp. Needs 
Central Services 
Inventory Control 
Photocopying 
Postage 

Telephone Switchboard 
Town Reports 
Compensation Plan 
Park Department 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Administration & Office 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Water Department 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Engineering Department 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Spring Grove Cemetery 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Maturing Debt 
Interest - School Loans, 
Water Bonds 
Temporary Loan - Interest 
Art. 15 - 1958 
Industrial Development 
Commission 
Art. 16 - 1960 

Pipe for Crossing #495 
Art. 44 - 1960 
Land at Haggetts Pond 
for Increasing Water 
Storage 
Art. 48 - 1960 
Storm Drainage Rogers 
Brook 
Art. 5 - 1961 
Improvements to 
Water System 
Art. 6 - 1961 

Engineering Superv . #495 
Art. 16 - 1961 
Land Purchase by 
Conservation Committee 



50 



Balance 
1/1/65 


Appropri- 
ations & 
Transfers 


Expendi- 
tures 


Transfers 

to 
Revenue 


Balance 
Reserved 
for 1966 


25,853 


.97 


202,627.48 
3,820.00 

3,000.00 

18,100.00 

2,500.00 


200,325.35 
3,090.00 

2,931.84 

18,099.55 

2,496.68 


730.00 

68.16 

.45 

3.32 


28 


,156.10 


11,955 


58 


10,138.00 
2,460.00 


15,373.69 
2,460.00 




6 


,719.89 


500 


00 


7,500.00 


6,478.23 


500.00 
1,021.77 






320 


34 










320.34 






1,000.00 
2,700.00 
3,500.00 
6,000.00 
1,910.85 
50,000.00 


566.00 
2,553.30 
3,496.38 

1,910.85 


434.00 

82.66 

3.62 

6,000.00 

50,000.00 




64.04 






14,058.00 
2,800.00 


14,008.52 
2,592.52 


49.48 
207.48 










37,732.00 
3,190.00 


37,730.48 
2,298.60 


1.52 
866.40 




25.00 






79,250.00 
96,773.00 


73,830.78 
70,924.20 


5,419.22 
23,603.80 


2 


,245.00 






9,996.00 
1,295.00 


8,409.21 
568.22 


1,586.79 
726.78 










32,950.41 

11,770.00 

340,000.00 


25,739.90 

7,240.48 
340,000.00 


7,210.51 
3,829.52 




700.00 






149,000.00 
11,000.00 


98,025.00 
5,733.82 


50,975.00 
5,266.18 






550. 


00 










550.00 


3,406. 


73 








3 


406.73 



8,252.20 

27,790.15 

883.54 
4,269.71 

1,500.00 



1,000.00 7,252.20 

27,790.15 

883.54 
4,269.71 

1,500.00 



Art. 24 - 1961 

Sanborn School 
Art. 25 - 1961 

Sewer, Love joy Road 
Art. 60 - 1961 

Civil War Centennial 

Committee 
Art. 16 - 1962 

Garbage Collection 
Art. 21 - 1962 

Land Acquisition 
Art. 22 - 1962 

Rogers Brook 
Art. 24 - 1962 

Establish Boundaries 
Art. 25 - 1962 

Drainage High School 
Art. 26 - 1962 

Easements at Crossing 

B&M RR 
Art. 27 - 1962 

Library Extension 

Plans 
Art. 49 - 1962 

Chap. 90, Highway 

Construction 
Art. 8 - 1963 

Water Drainage 

Improvements 
Art. 9 - 1963 

Highway Construction 
Art. 10 - 1963 

Establish Boundaries 
Art. 11 - 1963 

Sidewalk Construction 

Love joy Road 
Art. 12 - 1963 

Improvements to Water 

System 
Art. 13 - 1963 

Land for Pumping Sta. 

Mouth of Fish Brook 
Art. 32 - 1963 

Water Main in 

Cross Street 
Art. 7 - 1964 

Chap. 90, Highway 

Construction 
Art. 8 - 1964 

New High School 
Art. 8 - 1964 

Rogers Brook 

Construction 
Art. 9 - 1964 

Re-Classification 

Survey 
Art. 10 - 1964 

Establish Boundaries 
Art. 13 - 1964 

Improvements to 

Water System 



Balance 
1/1/65 



2,117.45 
3,421.59 

467.00 

2,141.38 

16,330.54 

8,371.20 

1,598.01 

.87 

25.00 

97.45 

1,136.88 

2,193.67 

15,407.34 

2,000.00 

6,528.90 

5,871.39 

2,267.88 

2,326.05 

54,000.00 
400,000.00 

25,000.00 

3,198.63 
2,000.00 

49,286.63 



Appropri- 
ations & 
Transfers 



96.00 



Expendi- 
tures 



1,910.16 



5.15 



2,500.00 



50.00 



424.78 
15,503.34 



1,226.17 

1,536.95 

1,695.71 

45,183.79 
303,482.01 



3,198.63 



21,736.81 



Transfers Balance 

to Reserved 
Revenue for 1966 



207.29 
3,421.59 

461.85 

2,141.38 

13,830.54 

8,371.20 

1,598.01 

.87 

25.00 

47.45 

1,136.88 

1,768.89 

2,000.00 
96.00 6,432.90 

4,645.22 

730.93 

630.34 

8,816.21 
96,517.99 

25,000.00 

2,000.00 
27,549.82 



51 



Balance 
1/1/65 



Art. 14 - 1964 

Water Drainage 

Improvements 11,245.74 

Art . 18 - 1964 

Police Station 69,966.00 

Art. 20 - 1964 

Plans for Secondary 

School Facilities ' 323.20 

Art. 21, 22, 23 - 1964 

Land Acquisition 94,928.95 

Art. 24 - 1964 

Recreation Facilities 4,605.54 
Art. 3 - 1965 

Land Acquisition - 

Shawsheen Road 
Art. 4 - 1965 

Appraisal of Robert & 

Adelaide Shorten Prop. 
Art. 6 - 1965 

Improvements to Water 

System, Dascomb Road 
Art. 6 - 1965 

Fish Brook 
Art. 7 - 1965 

Chap. 90, Highway 

Construction 
Art. 8 - 1965 

Stabilization Fund 
Art. 9 - 1965 

Establish Boundaries 
Art. 11 - 1965, 

Subsection 1 

Library Renovation 
Art. 11 - 1965, 

Subsection 2 

Public Works Garage 
Art. 11 - 1965, 

Subsection 4 

Fire Station 
Art. 12 - 1965 

Surface Water Drainage 

Improvements 
Art. 19 - 1965 

Water Storage Northwest 

Side Haggetts Pond 
Art. 27 - 1965 

Land Purchase Intersection 

School and Essex Streets 
Art. 31 - 1965 

Water Main, Cross Street 



Appropri- 
ations & 
Transfers 



Expendi- 
tures 



Transfers Balance 

to Reserved 
Revenue for 1966 



2,750.00 

40,000.00 

35,000.00 
100,000.00 

55,000.00 

25,000.00 

2,000.00 

106,000.00 

75,000.00 

25,000.00 

15,000.00 

1,000.00 



2,500.00 



30,000.00 



69,966.00 



200.00 

19,786.40 
6,276.91 

25,000.00 

93,790.79 

8,089.30 

453.00 

8,100.01 



11,245.74 



323.20 
1,212.00 42,750.00 50,966.95 
3,071.44 1,534.10 

2,750.00 

39,800.00 



15,654.73 



15,213.60 
93,723.09 

55,000.00 

2,000.00 

12,209.21 

66,910.70 

24,547.00 

6,899.99 

1,000.00 

2,500.00 
14,345.27 



888,351.76 5,907,851.06 5,528,617.51 503,500.78 764,084.53 



52 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCIES AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 



December 31, 1965 

Audit - Retirement System 

Audit - Municipal Accounts 

State Parks and Reservations 

Motor Vehicle Excise Billing 

County Tax 

Sale of Dogs 

County Hospital 

Tailings 

Barden Funds 

Title V 

Petty Cash Advance 

Walter Raymond Fund 

Temporary Loans 

Savings Bonds 

Federal Withholding Tax 

State Withholding Tax 

Article 6, 1963 - Chapter 782 

Article 6, 1964 - Chapter 822 

Group Life Insurance 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield Insurance 

Dog Licenses 

United Fund 

Trust Funds 

Perpetual Cares 

Miscellaneous 

Refunds: 

Summer School 

Summer School 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 

1965 Unapportioned Sewer 

Motor Vehicle Excise - 1963 & 1964 

Motor Vehicle Excise - 1965 

Personal Property Tax 

Real Estate Tax - 1964 

Real Estate Tax - 1965 

Water Rates 

Refund of Overpayments 



2,501.29 

3,162.89 

12,276.74 

1,927.80 

126,626.15 

33.00 

8,602.83 

3.78 

300.00 

802.43 

1,115.00 

931.70 

500,000.00 

29,118.75 

357,497.85 

44,636.47 

9,152.78 

11,673.61 

4,675.50 

37,937.64 

3,655.75 

877.50 

1,540.34 

6,776.75 

55.18 



70.00 

15.00 

14.18 

191.68 

5,423.61 

11,741.91 

156.30 

2,310.00 

6,669.74 

14.47 

7,930.51 

$1,200,419.13 



Cash Balance January 1, 1965 
Add: Receipts for 1965 

Less: Expenditures for 1965 
Cash Balance December 31, 1965 



$1,323,871.97 

7,403,935.96 

$8,727,807.93 
6,729,036.64 

$1,998,771.29 



53 



SEWER PROJECT, APW MASS. - 46G 
Balance, January 1, 1965 $ 87,307.68 

R0Ce ipts ' 

Federal Grants $138,000.00 

22,535.94 $160,535.94 

Interest on Bonds 2,065.97 162,601.91 

$249,909.59 
Expenditures: 

Final Payments on Project 15,739.39 

6,751.82 

145,41164 

4,252.67 

277.00 

416.85 172,849.37 

Balance, December 31, 1965 $ 77,060.22 



UNPAID TAXES 
DECEMBER 31, 1965 

Personal Property 
and Real Estate: 

Personal: 

1960 $ 148.20 

1961 57.20 

1962 78.00 

1963 2,393.01 

1964 1,925.47 

1965 4,362.20 $ 8,964.08 



Real : 




1960 


424.45 


1961 


691.60 


1962 


309.40 


1963 


928.33 


1964 


17,175.17 


1965 


113,097.37 



132,626.32 

Farm Animal Excise: 

1965 132.00 

Motor Vehicle & 
Trailer Excise: 

1957 147.44 

1958 141.60 

1959 1,171.64 

1960 2,640.49 

1961 2,688.58 

1962 1,795.53 

1963 2,441.20 

1964 7,537.58 

1965 31,607.67 50,171.73 

$191,894.13 



54 



ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 



Cash Balance, January 1, 1965 



2,104.06 



Receipts : 

Payroll Deductions 
Investment Income 
Appropriations : 

Andover Housing Authority 

Town 
Sale of Bonds 

Savings Account Withdrawals 
Reimbursement - Cost of Checks 



$ 716.00 
96,288.00 



163,186.26 
26,416.13 



97,004.00 

2,000.00 

15,000.00 

40.37 



203,646.76 



Disbursements : 

Administration Expense: 

Salaries 

Office Supplies 

Safe Deposit Box Rent 

Bonding Expense 

Postage 

Meals and Travel 
Refunds 

Interest on Refunds 
Annuities Paid 
Pensions Paid 
Investments : 

Savings Banks 

Bonds 

Accrued Interest 



205,750.82 



2,925.01 
145.32 
50.00 
51.00 
11.80 
11.40 



30,000.00 

50,188.75 

421.97 



3,194.53 

9,416.98 

76.86 

11,708.05 

97,627.23 



80,610.72 



202,634.37 



Balance, December 31, 1965 



3,116.45 



MUNICIPAL CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 
Balance Sheet - December 31, 1965 



Municipal Retirement Fund 
Cash and Securities 

Accrued Interest on Bonds 



Annuity Savings Fund 
699,116.73 Special Fund for Military 
Service 
6,982.86 Annuity Reserve Fund 
Pension Fund 
Expense Fund 



$ 706,099.59 



$ 523,819.01 

3,237.84 

108,698.81 

68,212.08 

2,131.85 

$ 706,099.59 



55 



ANALYSIS OF REVENUE ACCOUNT 



Budget Appropriations 
Special Articles voted 
at Town Meeting 
March 6, 1965: 
Art . 6 - Improvements 
to Water System - 
Dascomb Road 



$4,890,890.50 



Art . 7 
Art . 8 
Art. 9 
Art .11 
Art .12 



Chap. 90 Const 
Stabilization 
Establish Boun 
Library Renova 
Surface Water 
Drainage Improvements 
Art. 27 - Land Purchase 
Intersection of Schoo 
and Essex Streets 
Art. 31 - Water Main - 
Cross Street 
State Parks and Reservati 
State Examination of 

Retirement System 
State Audit of Municipal 

Accounts 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bill 
County Tax 

County Hospital Assessmen 
Overlay 1965 
1964 Underestimates: 
County Tax 
Overlay 1962 
Overlay 1964 
Tax Titles Added 
Balance to Surplus Revenu 



35 
r . 55 
Fund 25 
daries 2 
tion 36 



,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



15,000.00 



2,500.00 



Transfer from Surplus 

Revenue to Reduce 

Tax Rate 
Personal Property Tax 

Levy for 1965 
Real Estate Tax Levy 

for 1965 
1964 Overestimates: 

State Parks and 
Reservations 
Estimated Receipts 
Additional Real Estate 

Tax Levy 
Receipts in Excess of 

Estimated Receipts 
Unexpended Appropriations 



$ 



400,000.00 

169,041.20 

3,480,117.60 



1,138.38 
1,303,952.40 

333.20 

498,584.45 
264,911.40 



ons 



ing 
t 



30 
13 



,000 
,307 



00 
20 



2,501.29 



3 

1 

132 

8 

88 



9 

1 
762 



,162 
,927 
,351 
,602 
,795 

,357 
67 
,785 
,281 
,547 



89 
80 
90 
83 
27 

27 
60 
03 
80 
25 



$6,118,078.63 



$6,118,078.63 



ANALYSIS OF RESERVE FUND 



Town Manager - Salaries(Office)$ 1,000.00 

Town Reports 710.85 

Town Manager - Expense 450.00 

Water Dept . - Expense 3,773.00 

Town Manager - Expense 300.00 

Police Dept. - Equipment 1,200.00 

Photocopying - Expense 500.00 

Water Dept. - Expense 5,000.00 

Town Counsel - Special Cases 1,350.20 

Damages to Property 4,600.00 

Balance to Overlay Surplus 28,726.24 

$47,610.29 



Transfer from Overlay 
Surplus by vote of 
Town Meeting 
March 6, 1965 

Transfer of Unexpended 
Transfers from 
Appropriation Accounts 



$35,000.00 
12,610.29 



$47,610.29 



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57 



TAX COLLECTOR'S RECEIPTS - 1965 



TAXES 

1965: 
Personal 

Farm Animal Excise 
Real Estate 
Sewer - Added to Taxes 
Water - Added to Taxes 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens 
Sewer Betterments 
Water Betterments 
Apportioned Sewer - Paid 

Advance 
Apportioned Water - Paid 

Advance 
Committed Interest 

Interest : 
Personal Taxes 
Demands 

Farm Animal Excise 
Demand 
Real Estate 
Demand 
Sewer Betterments 

1964: 
Personal 
Real Estate 
Sewer - Added to Taxes 
Water - Added to Taxes 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens 
Interest : 
Personal Taxes 
Demands 
Real Estate 
Demands 

1963: 
Personal 
Real Estate 

Sewer - Added to Taxes 
Water - Added to Taxes 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens 
Water Services 

Interest : 
Personal Taxes 
Demands 
Real Estate 
Demands 

1962: 
Personal 

Farm Animal Excise 
Real Estate 
Water Liens 



$ 162,737.60 

550.51 

3,332,341.34 

4,894.33 



in 



in 



1,040.14 
2,268.55 
1,247.35 
90,887.23 
1,837.56 



1,821.35 

4,795.38 
126.46 

23.45 

46.00 

.30 

1.00 

596.15 

1.00 

32.66 



874.50 
99,478.16 
90.76 
439.26 
249.55 
742.75 

8.36 

14.00 

2,301.57 

172.00 



747.69 
5,444.45 
55.51 
35.72 
71.28 
70.01 
95.25 

39.78 

2.00 

374.58 

30.00 



7.80 

63.88 

1,629.10 

1.13 



TAXES (Cont.) 

Interest : 
Personal Taxes 
Farm Animal Excise 
Demand 
Real Estate 
Demands 

1961: 
Personal 

Interest : 
Personal Taxes 
Demands 

1959: 
Real Estate 
Water Liens 
Interest : 
Real Estate 

Sub-Total 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES 

1965 
1964 
1963 
1962 
1961 
1960 
1959 
1958 
1957 

Sub-Total 

Interest : 
1965 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Demands 
1964 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Demands 
1963 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Demands 
1962 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Demands 
1961 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Demands 
1960 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Demands 
1959 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Demands 
1958 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Demands 
1957 M. V. Excise Taxes 

Sub-Total 

TOTAL 



.80 

5.04 

1.00 

179.12 

9.00 



65.00 



6.98 
6.00 



210.60 
151.85 

26.48 



$3,718,949.32 



465,856.43 

58,689.13 

4,838.42 

388.10 

75.08 

160.79 

6.41 

31.12 

36.57 



5 530,082 


.05 


> 543 


.46 


930 


.00 


1,105 


.87 


755 


.00 


265 


.61 


13 


.00 


19 


73 


4 


00 


17 


.41 


3 


00 


34 


58 


5 


00 


1 


26 


2 


00 


5 


20 


2 


00 


4 


77 



$ 3,711.89 
$4,252,743.26 



58 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1965 

PROJECT 200 - 1 PROJECT 667 - 1 



Assets Assets 

Cash - Andover Cash - Andover 

Savings Bank @4% $ 7,461.87 Savings Bank @4% $ 6,594.74 

Cash - Andover Cash - Andover 

Savings Bank @4=|% 32,057.85 Savings Bank @4|% 6,411.56 

Cash - Essex ^ Cash - Administration 

Savings Bank @4f% 2,747.62 Fund 6,879.87 $ 19,886.17 

Cash - Administration — 

Fund 9,368.82 . Prepaid Insurance 1 794 n 

Cash - Petty Cash 25.00 $ 51,661.16 

Development Cost 505,000.00 
Accounts Receivable- Less Development 

Tenants 574.70 C ost Liquidation 35,000.00 470,000.00 

Accounts Receivable- 

State Aid 1,502.55 Total Assets $491,680.28 

Investments - U.S. :=== ' ■ ■■ 

Treasury Bonds @3 3/4% 15,000.00 T . , .,. 
t 4-4- t-> wj- o • Liabilities, Reserves and Surplus 
Investments - Debt Service 1 _ ouxpxuo 

Trust Fund @3 5/8% 1,000.00 

Debt Service Trust Fund 302.76 

Prepaid Insurance 1,369.40 Notes Authorized $505,000.00 

Less Notes Re- 
Development Cost 626,000.00 tired 35,000.00 $470,000.00 
Less Development Prepaid Rents ' 49.50 
Cost Liquidation 149,000.00 477,000.00 Matured Interest 

and Principal (137.63 

Total Assets $548,410.57 

= Reserves 

Liabilities, Reserves and Surplus Debt Service Reserve 6,732.00 

Operating Reserve 11,957.37 

Liabilities 



Matured Interest 

and Principal $ 12,281.74 
Tenants' Security 



Surplus 3, 079.03 



Total Liabilities, 
Deposits "~ 1,020.00$ 13 , 301 . 74 -? eserves and Sur plus $ 491,680.28 



Bonds Authorized 626,000.00 
Less Bonds Re- 
tired 149,000.00 477,000.00 

Reserves 
Debt Service 

Reserve 23,891.25 

Unamortized Bond 

Premium 1,302.76 

Reduction of Annual 

Contribution 1,750.00 
Operating Reserve 23,984 .43 50,928.44 

Surplus 7, 180.39 

Total Liabilities, 
Reserves and Surplus $548,410.57 



59 



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60 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 
January 1, 1966 



Real Estate and Property: 

Valuation of 1963 (Less Abatements) 
ii .. 1964 ii n 

II II 19 g 5 .. IT 

Motor Vehicles: 

Valuation of 1963 (Less Abatements) 
" " 1964 " " 
1965 " " 

Net Valuation for Three (3) Years (Less Abatements) 

Average Valuation for Three (3) Years (Less Abatements) 

Borrowing Capacity (5%) 



Town Debt as of December 31, 1965 

Less Debt Outside Debt Limit: 

Sanborn School $625,000 

High School 900,000 

South School 480,000 

Water 105,000 

Sewer 765,000 

Town Debt Inside Debt Limit 



$3,280,000 



2,875,000 
$ 405,000 
1966 



Borrowing Capacity as of January 1, 

Less Inside the Debt Limit Appropriations 
Voted but Not Bonded: 
1962 Rogers Brook $ 20,000 

1964 Rogers Brook 125,000 

1965 Library Addition 234,000 
" Public Works Garage 125,000 

Town Hall 550,000 

Fire Station 125,000 

" Police Station 150,000 

Uncommitted Borrowing Capacity as of January 1, 1966 

Outside Debt Limit Items Voted but Not Bonded as of January 1, 1966: 

1961 Sanborn School $ 15,000 

1964 New Senior High School 3,710,000 

1965 Fish Brook 1,000,000 

Notes Issued in 1965 in Anticipation of Bond Issues: 



New High School 
Public Works Garage 
Fish Brook 
Fire Station 



$ 300,000 

75,000 

100,000 

25,000 



$ 96,775,050 
100,827,084 
106,961,816 



6,656,343 
7,343,393 
7,323,106 

$325,886,792 

$108,628,930 

$ 5,431,446 



405,000 
$ 5,026,446 



1,329,000 
$ 3,697,446 



61 




1& iij&mmtm?* 




<^)&iai e t7?wn& 6^l9&?ftM ( ati<m£' antv tJaazitien/ 



Guy J. Rizzotto 

Commissioner 
Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 



awau 



£6 ' z/vuuen/ t/wee&, <d®6>it&/i/ 



February II4., 1966 



MAIL ADDRESS; 
P. O- BOX 2017 
BOSTON 6, MASS. 



Board of Selectmen 
Andover 

Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

This is to certify that the books and accounts of the 
town of Andover were audited by the Bureau of Accounts, Depart- 
ment of Corporations and Taxation, as of December 31* 1965* at 
which time they were found to be correct with all funds properly 
ace ount e d for . 

A detailed report of the audit will be forwarded as 
soon as possible. 



Very truly yours, 




Assistant Chief of Bureau 



WS :mdg 

cc: Town Clerk 









TOWN MEETING MINUTES 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 1, 1965 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, JUNE 21, 1965 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, AUGUST 16, 1965 



62 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 1, 1965 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, January 21, 1965, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and 
assembled at the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five 
and Six, viz: The Central Fire Station in Precinct One; the Musgrove Building, Elm 
Square, in Precinct Two; the Sacred Heart School, Balmoral Street, Shawsheen Village, 
in Precinct Three, the Andover Grange Hall in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, Bal- 
lardvale, in Precinct Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in Precinct Six, 
in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE FIRST DAY OF MARCH, 1965 

at 7:00 o'clock A. M., to act upon the following articles: 

Essex, SS. March 1, 1965 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
places and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Thomas P. Eldred, Constable 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

ARTICLE 1. 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at seven o'clock A. M. 
and closed at seven o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 4,825, in- 
cluding the absentee votes from the central counting, — viz: 

Precinct 1 - 1108 Precinct 2 - 710 Precinct 3 - 766 

Precinct 4 - 959 Precinct 5 - 315 Precinct 6 - 967 







PRECINCTS 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 
















MODERATOR - FOR ONE YEAR 


799 


459 


534 


652 


186 


679 


Arthur Williams 


159 


95 


92 


124 


61 


132 


William H. Wilson 


69 


85 


112 


116 


41 


93 


Joel R. Labell 


81 


71 


28 


67 


27 


63 


Blanks 



3309 
663 
516 
337 



63 







PRECINCTS 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 






326 


460 


582 


192 


SELECTMEN - TWO FOR THREE YEARS 


710 


707 


Roger W. Collins 


654 


342 


480 


618 


182 


661 


William Stewart 


528 


472 


385 


493 


172 


374 


Michael E. Brennan 


324 


280 


207 


225 


84 


192 


Blanks 




265 


290 


367 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE - TWO FOR THREE YEARS 


425 


97 


553 


Virginia H. Cole 


288 


162 


288 


324 


87 


426 


Daniel Frishman 


481 


287 


217 


364 


132 


319 


Louis J. Galbiati 


428 


189 


241 


234 


82 


171 


Simeon E. LeGendre Jr. 


137 


126 


118 


182 


72 


150 


Irving L. Newman 


227 


174 


217 


276 


71 


159 


Edward J. Sullivan Jr. 


230 


217 


161 


171 


89 


156 


Blanks 



2977 
2937 
2424 
1312 



1997 
1575 
1800 
1345 
785 
1124 
1024 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
ONE FOR FIVE YEARS 



340 


233 


414 


428 


124 


427 


678 


423 


274 


410 


149 


412 


90 


54 


78 


121 


42 


128 



John G. Mcintosh 
John B. White Jr , 
Blanks 



1966 

2346 

513 



All the foregoing officers were voted for on one ballot and the check lists were 
used . 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 1 



Andover, March 1, 1965 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Harold R. Barcrof t . Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 1099. Number of ballots received 2050. Number of ballots 
returned 951. Number of ballots cast 1099 plus nine absentee votes — total votes 
1108. Police officer on duty, Hector G. Pattullo Jr. Counted ballots at 7:00 P.M. 

Frederick E. Griffin, Clerk 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 2 



Andover, March 1, 1965 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Fernand J. Lussier. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 708. Number of ballots received 1450. Number of ballots 
returned 742. Number of ballots cast 708 plus two absentee votes — total votes 710. 
Police officer on duty, William Stewart. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 3 



Augustine P. Sullivan, Clerk 



Andover, March 1, 1965 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, A. Norman Warhurst . Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 763. Number of ballots received 1750. Number of ballots 
returned 987. Number of ballots cast 763 plus six absentee votes — total votes 766. 
Police officer on duty, Jacob Jacobson. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 

Philip A. Winters, Clerk 



64 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 4 



Andover, March 1, 1965 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M . Warden in charge, James D. Doherty . Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 957. Number of ballots received 2050. Number of ballots returned 
1093. Number of ballots cast 957 plus two absentee votes — total votes 959. Police 
officer on duty, Duncan M. Cairnie . Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 5 



Charles W. Smyth, Clerk 



Andover, March 1, 1965 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Chester A. MacMillan. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 315. Number of ballots received 900. Number of ballots 
returned 585. Number of ballots cast 315. Police officer on duty, Arthur Manock. 
Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 

John Duke, Clerk 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 6 



Andover, March 1, 1965 



Polls opened at 7:00 A. M. Warden in charge, Charles E. Piatt. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 964. Number of ballots received 2050. Number of ballots returned 
1086. Number of ballots cast 964 plus three absentee votes — total votes 967. Po- 
lice officer on duty, Robert V. Deyermond II. Counted ballots at 7:00 P. M. 

Edward A. Doyle, Clerk 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by virtue of 
Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Saturday, March 6, 1965, at 9:30 
o'clock A. M. at the Memorial Auditorium. 



65 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 6, 1965 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 367 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator at 9:50 A. M. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. Frederick B. Noss . 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman William Stewart. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit twenty-seven non-voters to the meeting, among 
them Town Manager Richard J. Bowen, who was given permission to address the meeting. 

The Moderator announced that no smoking or eating would be allowed in the Audito- 
rium. 

Voted to dispense with the reading of the warrant and service of the Constable. 

Voted that the Moderator refer to articles by number and subject matter without 
the Moderator reading the article and the person moving an article refer to it by 
number . 

ARTICLE 1 . To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, two 
members of the School Committee for three years, one member of the Andover Housing 
Authority for five years, and any other town officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot. 

All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 7:00 o'clock A. M. to 7:00 o'clock P. M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of the election of March 1, 1965, and de- 
clared Arthur Williams elected as Moderator and that he had previously been sworn to 
the faithful performance of the duties of that office. 

The Moderator then declared the other successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices and the Moderator also declared that they had been sworn to the 
faithful performance of the duties of their offices. 

Roger W. Collins, Selectman for Three Years 

William Stewart, Selectman for Three Years 

Virginia H. Cole, School Committee for Three Years 

Louis J. Galbiati, School Committee for Three Years 

John B. White, Jr., Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by bal- 
lot. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED Irving J. Whitcomb be elected a Trustee of 
Cornell Fund for three years . 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salary of elected TOWN OFFICERS for the ensuing year. 



66 



1 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the salaries of the elected Town 
Officers for the ensuing year be established at: (each item being voted on separate- 
ly) 



Board of Selectmen 
Chairman 
Four Members 

Moderator 



$500.00 
400.00 each 
25.00 



per annum 
per annum 
per meeting 



ARTICLE 4. To determine what sums of money shall be appropriated for the 1965 
Town Budget as submitted by the Town Manager and reviewed by the Finance Committee 
in their report. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and appropriate the following sums 
of money : 



Town Moderator 
Board of Selectmen 

Town Manager 



Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

(Incl. $500 out-of-state travel) 



Elections and Registrations Personal Services 

Other Expenses 



Finance Committee 
Town Accountant 

Town Treasurer 

Tax Collector 

Board of Assessors 

Town Counsel 
Town Clerk 
Planning Board 
Municipal Buildings 



Industrial Development 
Commission 

Central Services 



Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Expenses 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

(Incl. $150 out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 



Postage 

Telephone (Central Switchboard) 

Photocopying 



$ 



100.00 

2,700.00 
975.00 

18,350.00 
5,400.00 



7,323.00 
8,350.00 

900.00 

16,102.00 
855.00 

13,894.00 
2,005.00 

15,971.00 
2,305.00 

21,939.00 
6,670.00 



3,000.00 
4,500.00 

11,287.00 
1,506.00 

4,912.00 
6,190.00 

7,000.00 
16,400.00 

2,000.00 



3,500.00 
6,000.00 
2,200.00 



67 



Central Services-cont 



Board of Appeals 



Police 



Fire 



Civil Defense 



Animal Control 



Electrical Inspection 



Weights and Measures 



Building Inspection 



Administration 



Highways (General 
Maintenance) 

Snow Removal and Ice 
Control 

Sidewalks 



Highway Improvements 

Parks 

Trees 

Dutch Elm Control 

Insect Pest Control 

Vehicle Maintenance 

Street Lighting 
Engineering 



Inventory Control 
Town Report 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

(Incl. $400 out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

(Incl. $150 out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

(Incl. $200 out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



$ 1,000.00 
1,200.00 

864.00 
600.00 

208,292.00 
29,850.00 



269,021.00 
51,540.00 



750.00 
1,900.00 

600.00 
400.00 

3,115.00 
589.00 

1,300.00 
535.00 

10,079.00 
1,540.00 



35,527.00 
2,440.00 

79,487.00 
54,200.00 

24,233.00 
37,725.00 

6,776.00 
4,717.00 

1,759.00 
5,500.00 

13,702.00 
2,800.00 

16,019.00 
8,400.00 

11,283.00 
6,075.00 

7,512.00 
2,650.00 

12,652.00 
37,348.00 

39,500.00 

9,737.00 
1,145.00 



fi8 



Sewers 



Landfill 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

(Incl. $100 out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Garbage Contract 
Board of Health 

Animal Inspection 



Department of Public Welfare-Personal Services 

Other Expenses 
Assistance 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
Assistance 



Veterans' Services 

Andover School Department 

Regional Vocational School 
Memorial Hall Library 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

(Incl. $2,500 out-of-state travel) 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

($28,610 less $4,283.50 investment 

income and dog licenses) 
(Incl. $400 out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 

(Incl. $150 out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Department of Recreation 
Wa ter 

Spring Grove Cemetery 

Insurance 

Employee Benefits 

Patriotic and Civic Celebra- 
tions 

Veterans' Headquarters Rental-(Incl . $80 unpaid 1964 rent) 



Retirement 

Damage to Persons and 
Property 

State Census 

Temporary Loans 

Funded Debt 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
Pensions 



13,851.00 
13,600.00 



7,667.00 
7,500.00 

30,000.00 

13,984.00 
11,315.00 

600.00 

8,778.00 

1,465.00 

111,847.00 

10,148.00 

1,690.00 

33,225.00 

1,848,000.00 
410,953.00 



17,945.00 

90,883.00 
24,326.50 



36,097.00 
12,988.00 

77,788.00 
88,000.00 



24,361.00 
11,770.00 

50,000.00 

20,600.00 

1,925.00 

3,200.00 

2,500.00 

260.00 

93,528.00 

600.00 

1,800.00 

11,000.00 

149,000.00 



69 



Bond Redemptions 

Equipment Outlay 

Compensation Plan 

Total Budget to be raised by taxation 

SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM TAXATION) 

ARTICLE 6 Improvements to the Water System - Dascomb Road 

ARTICLE 7 Chapter 90 Highway Construction 

ARTICLE 8 Stabilization Fund 

ARTICLE 9 Establish Boundaries 

ARTICLE 11 Library Renovation 

ARTICLE 12 Surface Water Drainage Improvements 

ARTICLE 27 Land Purchase — Intersection of School and Essex Streets 

ARTICLE 31 Water Main — Cross Street 

TOTAL SPECIAL ARTICLES TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION 



340,000.00 
61,000.00 
50,000.00 



$4,890,890.50 



35,000.00 
55,000.00 
25,000.00 

2,000.00 
36,000.00 
15,000.00 

2,500.00 
30,000.00 



$ 200,500.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLE 



(TO BE BONDED) 



ARTICLE 11 Library Addition 

Public Works Garage 

Town Hall 

Police Station 

Fire Station — West Andover 

TOTAL SPECIAL ARTICLE TO BE BONDED 

SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM SURPLUS REVENUE) 

ARTICLE 11 Library Addition 

Library Renovation 

ARTICLE 15 Free Cash to reduce 1965 Tax Rate 

TOTAL SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SURPLUS REVFINUE 

GRAND TOTAL BUDGET AND SPECIAL ARTICLES 



$ 234,000.00 
125,000.00 
550,000.00 
150,000.00 
125,000.00 

$1,184,000.00 



$ 30,000.00 
40,000.00 

400,000.00 

$ 470,000.00 

$6,745,390.50 



ARTICLE 19 Water Storage, N. W. side Haggetts Pond 
(Transferred from Article 44, 1960) 

ARTICLE 10 Overlay Reserve to Reserve Fund 

ARTICLE 22 Reduce bonds voted under Article 8 of Special 

Town Meeting October 19, 1964 (Appropriate from 
Stabilization Fund) 



1,000.00 

35,000.00 
100,000.00 



70 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Town Manager and the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time 
after January 1, 1966, in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
January 1, 1966, in accordance with Section 4, Chapter 44, General Laws, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor payable within one year, and to renew any note so issued for 
a period of less than one year, in accordance with Section 17 of said Chapter 44. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 5 as printed. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $35,000.00 for improvements to the water system and authorize the following 
construction: 

(1) Water main 16 inches in size for a distance of 2,500 feet on 
Dascomb Road 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to raise by taxation and ap- 
propriate under Article 6 the sum of $35,000.00 for improvements to the water system 
and authorize the following construction: 

(1) Water main not more than 16 inches in size for a distance of 
2,500 feet on Dascomb Road 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $55,000.00 for Chapter 90 Highway Construc- 
tion, the Town to be reimbursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County, and 
to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, by pur- 
chase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to raise by taxation and ap- 
propriate under Article 7 the sum of $55,000.00 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, 
the Town to be reimbursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County, and to 
authorize the Town to acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, 
or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate by taxation the 
sum ob $25,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization Fund which was established by 
the Town in 1963 under Section 5B of Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to raise and appropriate by 
taxation under Article 8 the sum of $25,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization Fund. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation the sum of $2,000.00 
to establish boundaries and lay out the lines of existing ways used publicly but not 
accepted as public ways by Town Meeting action. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise by taxation under Article 9 the 
sum of $2,000.00. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $35,000.00 from Overlay 
Reserve to the Reserve Fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer $35,000.00 from Overlay Reserve 
to the Reserve Fund under Article 10. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of $1,290,000.00 for the 
construction and equipping of the following capital improvements: 

(1) Addition to the Memorial Hall Library including remodeling, recon- 
structing and making extraordinary repairs to the existing building- 
$340,000.00; 

(2) A public works garage - $125,000.00; 



71 



(3) A Town Hall and Police Station - $700,000.00; 

(4) A fire station to service West Andover - $125,000.00; 

and to determine whether the same shall be raised by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing, and authorize 
the acceptance of Federal aid for any of the above, or take any other action. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to appropriate the following sums for the 
construction and equipping of the capital improvements shown in Subsections 1, 2, 3 
and 4: — 

Subsection 1. Library 

VOTED that the sum of $264,000.00 be appropriated for the construction, originally 
equipping and furnishing of an addition to the Memorial Hall Library; that to meet 
this appropriation the sum of $30,000.00 be appropriated from surplus revenue and 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen be authorized to issue 
$234,000.00 in bonds or notes of the Town under GL c 44 as amended; that the sum of 
$76,000.00 be appropriated for remodeling, reconstructing, and making extraordinary 
repairs to the existing building; that to meet this appropriation the sum of 
$36,000.00 shall be raised by taxation and the sum of $40,000.00 is appropriated 
from surplus revenue; that the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library or other appro- 
priate Town officials be authorized to accept and contract for Federal aid for the 
project; and that the Town Manager shall have all powers necessary to carry out the 
project. The Vote YES 430-NO 10. Voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

Subsection 2. Public Works Garage 

VOTED unanimously that the sum of $125,000.00 be appropriated for the construction, 
originally equipping and furnishing of a public works garage; that to meet this ap- 
propriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen be authorized 
to issue $125,000.00 in bonds or notes of the Town under GL c 44 as amended; that 
the Board of Selectmen or other appropriate Town officials be authorized to accept 
and contract for Federal aid for the project; and that the Town Manager shall have 
all powers necessary to carry out the project. 

Subsection 3. Town Hall 

VOTED that the sum of $550,000.00 be appropriated for the construction, originally 
equipping and furnishing of a town hall; that to meet this appropriation, the Treas- 
urer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen be authorized to issue $550,000.00 
in bonds or notes of the Town under GL c 44 as amended; that the Board of Selectmen 
or other appropriate Town officials be authorized to accept and contract for Federal 
aid for the project; and that the Town Manager shall have all powers necessary to 
carry out the project. 

Subsection 3. Police Station 

VOTED that the sum of $150,000.00 be appropriated for the construction, originally 
equipping and furnishing of a police station; that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen be authorized to issue 
$150,000.00 in bonds or notes of the Town under GL c 44 as amended; that the Board 
of Selectmen or other appropriate Town officials be authorized to accept and con- 
tract for Federal aid for the project; and that the Town Manager shall have all 
powers necessary to carry out the project. 

The Vote YES 309, NO 144. Voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

Subsection 4. Fire Station-West Andover 

VOTED unanimously that the sum of $125,000.00 be appropriated for the construction, 
originally equipping and furnishing of a fire station in the West Andover section of 
the Town of Andover; that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer with the approv- 
al of the Board of Selectmen be authorized to issue $125,000.00 in bonds or notes of 



72 



the Town under GL c 44 as amended; that the Board of Selectmen or other appropriate 
Town officials be authorized to accept and contract for Federal aid for the project; 
and that the Town Manager shall have all powers necessary to carry out the project. 

A quorum was present during the discussion of Article 11. 

A count was taken prior to acting on Subsection 4 and there were 409 present in 
the Auditorium. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $15,000.00 for surface water drainage improvements and authorize the construc- 
tion hereinafter described, and to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary ease- 
ments by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Highland Road — 48" twin culvert at Rogers Brook (South Branch) $6,000.00 

Rattlesnake Hill Road — 12" pipe near No. 39 750.00 

Beacon Street — Replace masonry culvert 3,250.00 

Salem Street — Replace and extend culvert near No. 315 5,000.00 

The following are supposed to be owners of land which, under this article, may be 
subject to seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Phillips Academy 
Andover Associates, Inc. 
James A. and Martha M. Booth 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to raise by taxation and appro- 
priate under Article 12 the sum of $15,000.00 for surface water drainage improve- 
ments and authorize the construction hereinafter described, and to authorize the 
Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain. 

Highland Road — 48" twin culvert at Rogers Brook (South Branch) $6,000.00 

Rattlesnake Hill Road — 12" pipe near No. 39 750.00 

Beacon Street — Replace masonry culvert 3,250.00 

Salem Street — Replace and extend culvert near No. 315 5,000.00 

The following are supposed to be owners of land which, under this article, may be 
subject to seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Phillips Academy 
Andover Associates, Inc. 
James A. and Martha M. Booth 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
sell the building at 88 Carmel Road, sometimes referred to as the "Infirmary", and 
the land on which it lies for such sum as it deems best for the Town and to author- 
ize the Board of Selectmen to sign, seal with the Town seal and execute a deed or 
deeds of the said property. 

Article 13 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $5,000.00 for highway improvements on Osgood Street, and to authorize the Town to 
acquire by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, a parcel of 
land containing approximately 9090 square feet on the northeasterly side of Osgood 
Street from John M. and Elizabeth W. Forbes, the supposed owners of the land, as 
shown on a plan filed with the Town Manager. 



73 



Article 14 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use $400,000 
free cash to reduce the 1965 tax rate and to offset appropriations voted at the 1965 

Town Meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to permit the Assessors to use 
$400,000 free cash to reduce the 1965 tax rate and to offset appropriations voted at 
the 1965 Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 16. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the following unexpended 
appropriation be transferred to surplus revenue: 

1. Article 18, 1964 Police Station Shaw Barn $69,966.00 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to call 
for bids and award a contract for the collection and disposal of garbage for one 
year and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a three-year contract, if 
they deem it advantageous . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 17 as 
printed . 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriation 
or transfer from available land acquisition funds or other means, the sum of 
$150,000 for the purpose of planning, developing and building a sub-fire and police 
station, on the town owned property site situated in the triangle in front of the 
present town dump and bordered by Greenwood Road on the southeast and Chandler Road 
on the northeast. This Article being a petition of the West Andover Community As- 
sociation members and other residents of West Andover area in Precinct Four. 

Article 18 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to acquire portions of lot #1A as shown 
on Assessors' Map #194, portions of lot #2A as shown on Assessors' Map #195, and all 
of lots #18 through 23, 28, 28A, 29 through 36, and 39 through 128 as shown on Asses- 
sors' Map 195 located on the northwest side of Haggetts Pond, and supposed to be 
owned by McCoy, Bolten, Fingleton, Corr , Lynch, Bartigian, O'Conner, McCabe, Judge, 
Fallon, Regan, Thompson, Burke, and Poole, for storing water and for protecting the 
shore line, said land to be acquired by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain and to appropriate $1,000.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to appropriate under Article 
19 the sum of $1,000.00 to be transferred from Article 44, 1960. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to file, in behalf of the inhabitants of the Town, an application in form 
and manner required by the United States Government, and in conformity with P. L. 
560, 83rd Congress as amended by P. L. 345, 84th Congress and do whatever else may 
be required to obtain an advance to be made by the United States to the Town of 
Andover to aid in defraying the cost of final plans and specifications for the con- 
struction of a six million gallon distribution reservoir at Bancroft Road and con- 
necting main to South Main Street with the necessary appurtenances. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 20 as 
printed . 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to proceed 
with the necessary steps for the demolition of the Richardson School, the land so 
cleared to be used for the expansion of playground facilities. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 21 as printed. 



74 






ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of $100,000.00 from the 
Stabilization Fund for constructing, originally equipping and furnishing the new 
Senior High School . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the sum of $100,000.00 be 
appropriated from the Stabilization Fund to be applied to reduce to that extent the 
bonds voted under Article 8 of the Warrant of the Special Town Meeting of October 19, 
1964; and that any matching Stabilization Fund payment received from the Commonwealth 
be applied to the cost of the project in lieu of the issue of an equivalent amount 
of the bonds or notes authorized in said vote. 

ARTICLE 23 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt as a by-law of the Town, the 
1960 edition of the National Fire Prevention Code, copies of which are on file in 
the Town Clerk's office, and to impose as penalties for breach thereof, the sum of 
$20.00 for each offense. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 23 as printed. A quorum 
was present. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to continue for the further period of 
one (1) year the Committee to Study and Revise the Town By-Laws and Zoning By-Laws, 
appointed by the Selectmen for that purpose under Article 17 of the Town Warrant 
passed at the 1957 Town Meeting, such committee to report at the next annual town 
meeting or at any Special Town Meeting which may be held in the interim. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 24 as printed. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
enter into an agreement to lease out land, bounded by School and Ridge Streets and 
land of the railroad, and shown as Lot 26, Town Map 55, for parking purposes, for 
such sum as they deem best for the Town of Andover and to authorize the Selectmen to 
sign, seal with the Town Seal and deliver the lease of the said property. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town authorize the Board of Se- 
lectmen to enter into a lease of land for parking purposes, bounded by School St. 
and Ridge St., and land of the Railroad, being shown as lot 26 on Assessors' Map 
number 55; the lease to be for a period of not more than ten years, the rent to be 
not less than $10.00 per year, and the lease to be on such other terms as the Se- 
lectmen may deem proper. The Vote-YES 319, NO 3. Voted by more than 2/3 as re- 
quired. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a gift the fol- 
lowing described parcel of land, presently being used as a part of School Street; 
and to accept the said land as part of a public way called School Street as laid out 
by the Selectmen. 

A parcel of land on the southerly side of Essex Street containing approximately 
1,990 square feet. 

Beginning at a point in the southerly line of Essex Street 9.11' ± NW of its 
intersection with Ridge Street; thence N 76° 57' 10"W, 73 . 02± to a point; 
thence turning and running to the left on a curve of radius 43.72' a distance 
of 31.34 feet plus or minus to a point on the easterly line of School Street; 
thence turning and running N 18° 15^ OOE, 56.72' by the easterly line of School 
Street to a point at the southerly line of Essex Street; thence turning and run- 
ning S 51° 35' 10"E, 96.80* by the southerly line of Essex Street to the point 
of beginning. 

Shown on "Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. as surveyed for Town of Andover, Mass. 
Scale l"-20' , January, 1965, John Avery, Jr., Town Engineer," on the petition of 
Salvatore Torrisi and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 26 as 
printed. 



75 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire 
for the Town by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, a par- 
cel of land containing about 3,790 square feet supposed to be owned by Westport 
Realty Trust and a parcel of land containing about 36 square feet supposed to be 
owned by Boston & Maine Railroad, both at the southwesterly part of the intersection 
of School and Essex Street, and to appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to appropriate the sum of 
$2,500.00 from taxation under Article 27. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following resolution: 

WHEREAS the General Court sitting as a Constitutional Convention, did on July 16, 
1963 , give initial approval to a Home Rule amendment to the State Constitution, and 

WHEREAS this bill of rights for local governments required a second approval by 
the members of the General Court during this legislative session, and 

WHEREAS we, as members of this Town Meeting, feel competent to handle the affairs 
of our town without strict supervision by the Commonwealth of our every act and deed 

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that this town meeting hereby instructs its represen- 
tatives to the General Court to vote in favor of the Home Rule proposal (H 1384 of 
1963 as revised) when it comes before them, or, take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Upon motion duly seconded, acting under the foregoing article, the following 
amendment was adopted: 

VOTED to request the Massachusetts Legislature to approve House Bill No. 1884 
proposing a constitutional amendment to limit the authority of the Legislature to 
pass laws adding to the costs or reducing the income of cities and towns unless it 
provides the money therefor, and to instruct the Town Clerk to send copies of this 
resolution to the Senate President, the House Speaker, and the Senate and House 
chairmen of the Committee on Constitutional Law. 

Thereafter, the Town Meeting adopted Article 28 as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of five hundred 
dollars from available funds or by taxation for the removal of scrub brush and 
trees from the extreme west section of a public way known as Carlisle Street, on 
petition of Donald MacNeil and others . 

Article 29 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to raise by taxation and ap- 
propriate or transfer from available funds the sum of $8,900.00 for improvements to 
the water system and to authorize the following construction — to install an eight- 
inch water main on Tewksbury Street for a distance of 1000 feet from the existing 
main. Betterments will be assessed, on petition of James V. Letters, Jr. and others. 

Article 30 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $30,000.00 for constructing 2100 feet more 
or less of 12" water main in Cross Street from the present termination of the exist- 
ing 12" main installed in 1963, in conformance with the master plan for water dis- 
tribution in Andover. Said main to be installed under the betterment act, on peti- 
tion of Jean Chalif our and others . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise by taxation the sum of $30,000.00 
under Article 31 . 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence C to 
Industrial D the following described parcel of land: 



76 



Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Frontage Road and the State 
Highway Access Ramp and running northerly four hundred and thirty and eight one- 
hundredths (430.08), thence turning and running easterly three hundred and forty 
feet (340') to the westerly boundary of State Highway Route 93; thence turning south- 
erly four hundred thirty and eight hundredths feet to the State Highway Access Ramp; 
thence following northern contour of said State Highway Access Ramp in a westerly 
direction to a point twenty feet (20') east of the point of beginning; thence turn- 
ing west twenty-feet (20') to the point of beginning, on the petition of William A. 
Schlott and others. This description is intended to describe Lot #29 on Town Asses- 
sors ' Map #179 . 

Article 32 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence C to 
Shopping Center District the land described as follows: 

A certain parcel of land in the Town of Andover, County of Essex, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and located on the northerly side of Lowell Street, a County way in 
said Town and bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at the southeasterly corner thereof at a point in the northerly side of 
Lowell Street and at land of Sidney P. White, said point being 405.51' westerly from 
an intersection of the northerly side of Lowell Street with the westerly side of 
Greenwood Road; thence running S. 66°-18'-43" W. by said Lowell Street 195.75' to an 
Essex County Stone Bound; thence by a curve to the left, having a radius of 400', 
still by daid Lowell Street 96.33' to a point at land of the Chase Manhattan Bank; 
thence by a curve to the right having a radius of 16.99', a distance of 24.61' to a 
point; thence running N. 44°-30'-28" W. by land of said Bank and land of the Rolling 
Green Motor Inn Corp. 158.14' to a point; thence turning and running N. 66°-17'-42" 
E . by said land of the Rolling Green Motor Inn Corp. 71.68' to a point; thence turn- 
ing and running N. 42°-35'-18" W. by said land of the Rolling Green Motor Inn Corp. 
419.41' to a point; thence turning and running S. 64°-33'-42" W. still by said Roll- 
ing Green Motor Inn Corp. 85.76' to land of Harry Axelrod; thence turning and runn- 
ning N. 44°-30'-28" W. by said land of Harry Axelrod 411.68' to a point; thence 
turning and running N. 44°-55'-58" E., still by land of said Harry Axelrod 782.74' 
to a point marking the northwesterly corner of Lot #9 as shown upon a plan entitled, 
"Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. as made for Harry Axelrod, Scale 1"-100' , dated 
February 16, 1959 and recorded,"; thence turning and running S. 46°-35'-10" E. by 
the southwesterly side of Lot #9 104' to a point marking the northwesterly corner of 
Lot #8 on said plan (both lots #8 and #9 being land of Harry Axelrod) thence running 
S. 35°-10'-37" E. by land of said Axelrod and land of Donald W. and Emily Danforth 
187' to a point marking the southwesterly corner of Lot #7; thence turning and run- 
ning N. 66°-18'-43" E. by said land of Danforth and the southerly side of Lot #7 
101.74' to land of HerbertT. and Janet L. Lake; thence turning and running S. 23°- 
41 '-17" E. by said land of Lake 250' to a point marking the southwesterly corner of 
Lot #6 as shown upon said plan; thence turning and running S. 66°-18'-43" W. by the 
northerly side of Lot #5 being land of Rudolph A. and Alice P. Rotollo 20.58' to a 
point; thence turning and running S. 23°-41'-17" E. by said land of Rotolo and the 
westerly end of an easement for passage running westerly from Greenwood Road 258' 
to a point in the northerly line of Lot #4 as shown upon said plan; thence turning 
and running S. 66°-18'-43" W. by the said northerly line of Lot #4 and land of 
Walter L. and E. Pauline Whinn 63.43' marking the northwesterly corner of said Lot 
#4 as shown upon said plan; thence turning and running S. 23°-41'-17" E. by said 
land of Whinn and said land of Theodore and Claire B. Jarek and being the westeiiy 
ends of Lots #4 and #3 on said plan 251.17' to a point in the northerly line of Lot 
#1 and land of Sidney P. White; thence turning and running S. 66°-18'-43" W. by the 
northerly line of Lot #1 110.64' to a point marking the northwesterly corner of 
said Lot #1; thence turning and running S. 7°-56'-17" E. by the westerly side of 
said Lot #1 181.83' to the point in the northerly side of Lowell Street and place of 
beginning. 

Said parcel contains 15.72 Acres, be the same more or less and as shown upon a plan 
entitled, "Plan Showing Proposed Shopping Center District and Recreation Area made 
for Harry Axelrod, Andover, Mass. Scale 1"-100" dated Dec. 29, 1964, as made by 
Clinton F. Goodwin, Registered Professional Engineer, Haverhill, Massachusetts, on 



77 



petition of Harry Axelrod and others. 

Article 33 was defeated. The Vote YES 134, NO 266. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways, Wethersfield 
Drive, Cameron Road and Tamys Lane, as laid out by the Selectmen, and shown on a 
plan entitled: "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, Wood Ridge, Andover, Mass., Owner: 
Arthur A. Collins Realty, Inc., Engineer, George E. Hayes," which plan is recorded 
in North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 4644, and a copy of which is on file in 
the office of the Town Clerk, on petition of Arthur Collins and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 34 as printed, subject 
to granting all rights to the streets to the Town of Andover, as approved by Town 
Counsel and the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way Wagon Wheel 
Road, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, and shown on a plan entitled: "Sub- 
division & Acceptance Plan, Arthur A. Collins, Sept. 28, 1963, Dana F.Perkins & Sons, 
Inc., Engineer," which plan is recorded in North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 
4968, and a copy on file in the office of the Town Clerk, on petition of Arthur A. 
Collins and others . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 35 as printed, subject 
to granting all rights to the streets to the Town of Andover, as approved by Town 
Counsel and the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Standish Circle, as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Albert A. 
Miller and Wilbur C. Nylander, Surveyors" dated September 10, 1962 and shown as plan 
number 20346 M Sheet 1 and filed with Certificate of Title number 5335, Book 36, Page 
141 in the North Registry District of Essex County; the plan and description along 
with drainage and utility easements for recording purposes being on file with the 
Town Clerk, on petition of Regnet-Andover , Inc. and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 36 as printed, subject 
to granting all rights to the streets to the Town of Andover, as approved by Town 
Counsel and the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Miles 
Circle, as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen as 
shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Albert A. Miller and 
Wilbur C. Nylander, Surveyors" dated September 10, 1962 and shown as plan number 
20346 M Sheet 1 and filed with Certificate of Title number 5335, Book 36, Page 141 in 
the North Registry District of Essex County; the plan and description along with 
drainage and utility easements for recording purposes being on file with the Town 
Clerk, on petition of Regent-Andover , Inc. and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 37 as printed, subject 
to granting all rights to the streets to the Town of Andover, as approved by Town 
Counsel and the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name May- 
flower Road, as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Select- 
men as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land, in Andover, Albert A. 
Miller and Wilbur C. Nylander, Surveyors" dated September 10, 1962 and shown as 
plan number 20346 M Sheet I and filed with Certificate of Title number 5335, Book 36, 
Page 141 in the North Registry District of Essex County; the plan and description 
along with drainage and utility easements for recording purposes being on file with 
the Town Clerk, on petition of Regent-Andover, Inc. and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 38 as printed, subject 
to granting all rights to the streets to the Town of Andover, as approved by Town 
Counsel and the Board of Selectmen. 



78 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way, 
Applecrest Road as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Se- 
lectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Correction Plan of Applecrest Road in Downing 
North Acres", Andover, Massachusetts, dated August, 1963, by Clinton F. Goodwin, 
Reg. Land Surveyor, said plan being recorded in Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 4880. Plan and description for recording purposes being on file 
with the Town Clerk, on petition of William J. Moore and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 39 as printed, subject 
to granting all rights to the streets to the Town of Andover as approved by Town 
Counsel and the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way, 
Downing Street as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Select- 
men as shown on a plan entitled "Sub-Division and Acceptance Plan, Downing North 
Acres, Section I", Clinton F. Goodwin, Engineer, September, 1955, said plan is 
recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 3222. Plan and 
description, along with drainage easements for recording purposes being on file with 
the Town Clerk, on petition of William J. Moore and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 40 as printed, subject 
to granting all rights to the streets to the Town of Andover as approved by Town 
Counsel and the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to accept on 
behalf of the Town the grant of an easement from Augustinian College of the Merri- 
mack Valley, to allow surface drainage to pass from land, once of Downing, across 
land of the college to a brook. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 41 as printed. 

ARTICLE 42. To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 42 as printed. 

ARTICLE 43. To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

A motion was made by Janes H. Eaton III and duly seconded that the Moderator ap- 
point a committee of nine members to study the feasibility of going to representa- 
tive Town Meeting. 

This motion was defeated. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 4:45 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 

IRVING 0. PIPER 
TOWN CLERK 



79 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
JUNE 21, 1965 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, June 17, 1965, the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs, met and assembled at the 
Memorial Auditorium, Bartlet Street, on Monday, the twenty-first day of June, 1965 
at 7:30 P. M. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator at 7:55 P. M. with 
less than a quorum present. The Moderator stated that the meeting would be opened 
with prayer and salute to the flag. A count would then be taken to determine if a 
quorum was present . 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit one non-voter, Town Manager Richard J. Bowen 
who was also granted permission to address the meeting. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. Earl B. Robinson, Minister of the Andover Bap- 
tist Church. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman William Stewart. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 359 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. At 8:08 P. M., the Moderator announced that a quorum was now present. 

Voted to dispense with the reading of the warrant and service of the Constable. 

Voted that the Moderator refer to the articles by number instead of reading the 
article . 

(Constable's Return) 

Essex, SS. June 21, 1965 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted, and by publication 
in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Thomas P. Eldred, Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to release 
such easements taken over land of Jaycole Realty, Inc. for improvements to Rogers 
Brook, as, in their discretion are no longer needed. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the Selectmen be author- 
ized to release for the sum of one dollar such easements taken over land of Jaycole 
Realty Corporation, as, in their opinion, are no longer needed. 

ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and the Town 
Manager to file, in behalf of the inhabitants of the Town, an application in form 
and manner required by the United States Government, and in conformity with P. L. 
560, 83rd Congress as amended by P. L. 345, 84th Congress and do whatever else may 
be required to obtain an advance to be made by the United States to the Town of 
Andover to aid in defraying the cost of plans and specifications for the construc- 
tion of an elementary school. 



80 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 2 as printed, 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell, for 
a sum not less than $1,200., property on Lupine Road known as Lot #157, Map #55 in 
the Assessors' records as recorded in Book #932, Page 444 in the County of Essex 
Registry of Deeds and bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a stone bound at the intersection of the southeasterly side 
line of Lupine Road with the southwesterly side line of School Street, 
thence southeasterly by School Street one hundred sixty-seven feet to a 
point; thence southwesterly by land of owners unknown one hundred five 
feet to the wall of the Burying Ground of the South Church, and, further 
southwesterly by said wall one hundred eighty-eight feet to a corner in 
the wall; thence westerly by other land of the grantor thirty feet to a 
stone bound in the side line of Lupine Road; thence northerly and north- 
easterly on two courses by Lupine Road three hundred sixty-eight feet to 
the point of beginning; containing 33675 square feet, more or less; -and 
to authorize the Selectmen to sign, seal with the Town Seal, and execute 
a deed or deeds for the said property. 

Article 3 was defeated — The Vote YES-25, N0-274 . 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire for 
the Town by gift, an easement over land now or formerly of Salvatore J. and Elaine 
DeSalvo for the flowage of surface drainage water. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 4 as printed, 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence A. to 
Apartment District the following described parcel of real estate: 

Beginning at the northwesterly corner of the premises in the easterly line 
of Morton Street at a stone bound at land of Phillips Academy; thence run- 
ning southeasterly by land of said Phillips Academy five hundred sixty- 
eight and 70/100 feet to an old pipe in a stone wall at other land of 
Phillips Academy; thence turning and running southerly by land of Phillips 
Academy and the stone wall two hundred eighty-four and 87/100 feet to a 
point; thence turning and running westerly by other land of said Phillips 
Academy three hundred forty-five and 53/100 feet to the southeasterly 
corner of land of George Marad; thence turning and running northerly by 
land of said Marad and land now or formerly of Paul E. Desrosiers two 
hundred and twenty-seven and 13/100 feet to a point; thence turning and 
running by a curved line in a westerly direction by land now or formerly 
of said Desrosiers one hundred fifty-four and 04/100 feet to the easterly 
line of Morton Street; thence turning and running northerly and northeast- 
erly by Morton Street three hundred twenty-four and 85/100 feet to the 
stone bound at the point of beginning. Said premises are shown on plan 
entitled "Plan of Swallow's Nest, Andover, Mass., Owner Oscar Hoehn, 
August 1964", said plan being recorded in the North District of Essex 
Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 5141, on petition of Agnes C. Wholey and 
others . 

Article 5 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire 
land for a town house and/or parking, by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain, and to appropriate the sum of $50,000.00 therefor, said sum to 
be appropriated from available funds or to be raised by the issuance of bonds or by 
a combination thereof. The land is on Main Street, Andover, and is supposed to be 
owned by Karl C. and Geneva H. Killorin. 

Article 6 was moved and duly seconded. After lengthy discussion of the pros and 
cons, Selectman Allen moved to amend the motion, in order to withdraw the article. 
This amendment to withdraw was voted by a majority. At this time, a quorum was 
questioned. A count was taken and showed there were 392 voters present in the 



81 



Auditorium. Then the vote on Article 6 as amended to withdraw was voted by a major- 
ity. 

ARTICLE 7. To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

A motion was made to appoint a committee of fifteen to study the advisability of 
representative town meeting. At this point, another count was taken which showed 
lack of a quorum. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 10:00 o'clock P. M. 
The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 

IRVING 0. PIPER 
Town Clerk 



82 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
AUGUST 16, 1965 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, August 2, 1965, the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Andover , qualified to vote in Town Affairs, met and assembled at the 
Memorial Auditorium, Bartlet Street, on Monday, the sixteenth day of August, 1965 
at 8:00 P. M. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 8:15 P. M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit five non-voters to the meeting. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. Robert E. Bossdorf, Minister of the Ballard- 
vale United Church. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman William Stewart. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 464 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

Voted to dispense with the reading of the warrant and service of the Constable. 

Voted that the Moderator refer to the articles by number instead of reading the 
article and the person moving the article refer to it by number also. 

(Constable's Return) 

Essex, SS. August 16, 1965 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the 
time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted, and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published 
seven days . 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a gift about 11^ acres of 
land located off Wildwood Road, said land being portions of Lots 1, 2 and 3 of 
Assessors' Map 45 and Lot 34 of Assessors' Map 62 and as shown on a map on file in 
the Town Clerk's office. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the Town accept as a 
gift about II2 acres of land off Wildwood Road, said land being portions of Lots 1, 
2 and 3 of Assessors' Map 45 and Lot 34 of Assessors' Map 62 as described on a deed 
on file in the Town Clerk's office. 

ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
sell for such sum as it deems best for the Town about 2^ acres of land on Wood Hill, 
said land being a part of Lot No. 15 on Assessors' Map 219, as recorded in Book 
697, Page 548 in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds, and in accordance with 
a plan on file in the Town Clerk's office, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to sign, seal with the Town seal and execute a deed or deeds of the said property. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
sell for such sum as it deems best for the Town about 2^ acres of land on Wood Hill, 
said land being a part of Lot No. 15 on Assessors' Map 219, as recorded in Book 697, 



83 



Page 548 in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds, and in accordance with a 
plan on file in the Town Clerk's office, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
sign, seal with the Town seal, acknowledge and deliver a deed or deeds of the said 
property. The Vote YES 423-NO 21 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A quorum 
was present . 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire for 
the Town by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain a parcel of 
land on Shawsheen Road containing about 7.5 acres supposed to be owned by Peter C. 
Paicos and described as Lot 45 on Assessors' Map 89 and recorded in Book 811, Page 
277 of the Essex North District Registry of Deeds and to appropriate by transfer, 
the sum of $4,000.00 therefor, said funds being presently available in the Land 
Acquisition fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to authorize the Selectmen to 
acquire for the Town by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain 
a parcel of land on Shawsheen Road containing about 7.5 acres supposed to be owned 
by Peter C. Paicos and described as Lot 45 on Assessors' Map 89 and recorded in 
Book 811, Page 277 of the Essex North District Registry of Deeds and to appropriate, 
by transfer the sum of $2,750.00 therefor, said funds being presently available in 
the Land Acquisition Fund. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire for 
the Town by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain a parcel of 
land on Park Street containing about 5,266 square feet and the building thereon sup- 
posed to be owned by Robert W. Shorten and Adelaide Webb Shorten and described as 
Lot 2 on Assessors' Map 39 and as recorded in Book 811, Page 277 of the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds and to appropriate by transfer, the sum of $40,000.00 
therefor, said funds being presently available in the Land Acquisition Fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to authorize the Selectmen to acquire for 
the Town by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain a parcel of 
land on Park Street containing about 5,266 square feet and the building thereon sup- 
posed to be owned by Robert W. Shorten and Adelaide Webb Shorten and described as 
Lot 2 on Assessors' Map 39 and as recorded in Book 811, Page 277 of the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds and to appropriate by transfer, the sum of $40,000.00 
therefor, said funds being presently available in the Land Acquisition Fund and fur- 
ther that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to demolish the garage building, and 
further that the land to be used for a park, for parking or for a municipal build- 
ing. The Vote YES 332, NO 80 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A quorum was 
present . 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire for the Town by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, 
a parcel of land, being a portion of Lot 117, shown on Town Assessors' Map No. 38, 
for the relocation of a portion of High Street and as shown on a plan on file with 
the Town Clerk; and to authorize the abandonment of that portion of the existing 
High Street to be relocated, the abandoned portion to become part of Lot 117 as 
shown on Town Assessors' Map #38 by sale; and to appropriate from available funds 
the sum of $15,000.00 for the construction of the relocated portion of High Street. 

Article 5 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of one million 
($1,000,000.00) for the construction and equipping of a pumping station, dam and 
impounding reservoir at the mouth of Fish Brook near the Merrimack River, Andover ; 
a twenty-four (24) inch concrete raw water transmission line from the pumping sta- 
tion to Haggetts Pond; and all necessary appurtenances in accordance with plans and 
specifications on file in the Office of the Town Clerk; and authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire all necessary land and easements thereto by gift, by purchase 
or by seizure by right of eminent domain; and to determine whether the same shall be 
raised by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the 
foregoing; and to authorize the acceptance of Federal or State aid for the above ; or 
take any other action. 



84 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the sum of One Million Dol- 
lars ($1,000,000.00) be appropriated for the construction and equipping of a pumping 
station, dam and impounding reservoir at the mouth of Fish Brook near the Merrimack 
River, Andover ; a twenty-four (24) inch concrete raw water transmission line from 
the pumping station to Haggetts Pond; and all necessary appurtenances in accordance 
with plans and specifications on file in the Town Clerk's office; that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen be author- 
ized to issue One Million Dollars ($1,000,000.00) in bonds or notes of the Town 
under GL c44 as amended; that the Board of Selectmen or other appropriate Town offi- 
cials be authorized to contract for and accept Federal or State aid for the project; 
that the Town Manager shall have all powers necessary to carry out the project; that 
the Board of Selectmen are authorized and empowered to acquire all necessary land 
and easements thereto by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

A quorum was present. 

ARTI CLE 7 . To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet - 
irig~. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 10:05 P. M. 
The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



IRVING 0. PIPER 
TOWN CLERK 



85 



JURY LIST 



JUNE 1965 



Adams, Helen W. 
Ainscow, George W. 
Anderson, Charles W. Jr , 
Anderson, Ernest E. 
Anderson, Helge M. 
Axelrod, Harry 
Ball, J. Rodney Jr. 
Barcroft, Alice E. 
Barnard, Elizabeth F. D 
Barrett, John J. 
Barton, Joseph F. 
Batchelder, Harry A. 
Bateson, James Sr . 
Bendroth, Norma H. 
Best, George E. 
Bolia, Margery E. 
Boutwell, Everett S. 
Bradley, Frederick W. 
Bravacos, Louis J. 
Brennan, John C. 
Brown, Lee B. 
Brown, Will G. Jr. 
Calcina, Carmelo 
Campbell, Daisy G. 
Campopiano, Joseph 
Capen, Bernard H. 
Carmichael, James G. 
Carpentier, Albert L. 
Caswell, Helen E. 
Chadwick, Alan G. 
Chase, Dorothy 0. 
Clements, Eleanor T. 
Clinton, Joseph A. 
Clotworthy, Frances D. 
Cole, Ralph K. 
Collins, J. Everett 
Connolly, Alice 
Cookson, Francis R. 
Cookson, Harold T. 
Coutts, Margretta M. 
Cromie, Gilbert J. 
Cronin, Timothy F. 
Custer, Charles J. 
Cutler, Granville K. 
Daly, P. Francis 
Danforth, Philip F. 
Dearborn, Lauren R. 
DeBell, Charles W. 
DeHart, William K. 
Dennison, Harold 
DeQuattro, Alfred 
Desrocher, Edward C. 
DesRoches , Robert F. 
Deyermond, Eileen A. 
Deyermond, John 
Doherty, Joseph B. 



Housewife 

Section Chief 

Accountant 

Poultryman 

Maint. Supervisor 

General Manager 

Bank Examiner 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Retired 

Dairy Shipper 

Lineman 

Truck Driver 

Housewife 

Office Manager 

Homemaker 

Warehouse 

Self-employed 

Regional Manager 

Salesman 

Housewife 

Retired 

Service Manager 

Housewife 

Real Est. and Ins. 

Retired 

Sales Supervisor 

Engr . Manager 

Manager-Part-time 

Asst. Superintendent 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Inspector 

Housewife 

Cotton Broker 

Retired 

Cafeteria Worker 

Photographer 

Ind. Sales Manager 

Housewife 

Bldg. Superintendent 

Contractor 

Engineer 

Metal Worker 

Clerk 

Bank President 

Inspector 

Asst. Works Manager 

Chemical Engineer 

Asst. Treasurer 

Spray Painter 

Gas Attendant 

Asst. Vice Pres . 

Housewife 

Retired 

Real Est. and Ins. 



30 Pasho Street 
59 Love joy Road 

73 High Street 

100 Ballardvale Road 
96 Gould Road 

27 Alden Road 

10 Lincoln Circle 
134 Chestnut Street 
187 Chestnut Street 

12 Henderson Avenue 

34 Florence Street 
32 Foster Pond Road 

28 Foster Circle 

17 High Street 

4 Argyle Street 
14 Riverina Road 
408 High Plain Road 
7 Central Lane 

59 Lowell Street 

14 Brook Street 
193 Main Street 

63 Abbot Street 

21 Magnolia Avenue 

98 Cheever Circle 
2 Hidden Road 

15 Virginia Road 
59 Whittier Street 

5 Old South Lane 

5 Dumbarton Street 
178 Holt Road 
77 Whittier Street 
39 Sunset Rock Road 

74 Summer Street 
159 Holt Road 

15 Marion Avenue 

35 Summer Street 

18 Avon Street 
123 Main Street 
197 River Road 

13 Henderson Avenue 
106 Abbot Street 

79 Cheever Circle 
38 Canterbury Street 

99 Shawsheen Road 
15 Cuba Street 

9 Forbes Lane 
109 Elm Street 

11 Oriole Drive 
21 Arthur Road 
83 High Street 
73 School Street 
21 Florence Street 
103 Reservation Road 

64 Andover Street 
79 Memorial Circle 
11 Locke Street 



86 



Donahue, Frank W. 
Dubocq, William E. 
Duffy, Elizabeth I . 
Dufton, Virginia R. 
Elliott, Fay H. 
Farnsworth, Nathalie B. 
Ferrier, Robert L. 
Fitzgerald, Frederick P. 
Forma, Bette E. 
Friel, John A. 
Funk, William M . 
Garrison, Jedediah L. 
Gerraughty, James V. Jr. 
Glendinning, Eve C. 
Goldthwaite, Eleanor F. 
Gordon, Katherine M. 
Gordon, Walter N. 
Hall, Eleanor P. 
Hall, John W. Jr. 
Haller, Harold 
Hart, William J. 
Haselton, Mabel M. 
Hayes, Ruth 
Hickey, William R. 
Higgins, Forrest E. 
Hobkirk, Ethel F. 
Hoffman, Joseph W. 
Homsey, Emily W. 
Hood, Thomas M. 
Hornidge, Richard D. 
Howe, Douglas N. 
Hoyer, Mary 
Hudgins, Dean B. 
Inman, Glenn W. 
Jenkins, Henry K. 
Johnson, Mitchell Jr. 
Jones , Nancy J . 
Kaczynski, Charles S. 
Keaney, Sylvester A. Jr. 
Kempton, Albert E. 
King, Harold T. 
Knipe, Edith E. 
Lake, Janet D. 
Leacock, John H. 
Lebach, Gerry A. 
Letters, James V. Jr. 
Lewis, Warren A. 
Locke, Benjamin W. 
Look, Robert E. 
Low, Thomas W. 
Lynch, Raymond 
MacKenzie, William 
MacLeish, Russell C. 
Markert, John H. 
Marocco, Girolamo 
Marotta, George J. 
McAllister, John B. 
McCarthy, Irene H. 
McCoubrie, Robert J. 
McGovern, Mildred W. 
McLean, John M. 
Miller, Norman L. 
Milligan, Charles E. 
Minard, Dorothy L. 
Mitchell, Ormiston C. 



Refrigeration 

Retired 

Real Estate Broker 

At Home 

Retired 

Housewife 

Electrician 

Salesman 

Housewife 

Messenger 

Planning Engineer 

Supervisor 

Pres . and Treas . 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Maintenance 

Housewife 

Grounds keeper 

Office Manager 

Packer 

At Home 

At Home 

Campus Guard 

C. P. A. 

Housewife 

Contractor 

Desk Clerk 

Asst. Secretary 

Project Engineer 

Real Est. and Ins. 

Housewife 

Dispatcher 

Supervisor 

Resort Owner 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Toolmaker 

R. E. Broker 

Engineering Director 

Supervisor 

Reg. Nurse 

Housewife 

Groundsman 

Manager 

Exper . Machinist 

Salesman 

Devel . Machinist 

Account Manager 

Prod . Control 

Shipper 

Set-up Man 

Sales Supervisor 

Sales Engineer 

Retired 

Supervisor 

Production Manager 

Social Worker 

Head Custodian 

Housewife 

Trades Helper 

Bank Treasurer 

Foreman 

Housewife 

Retired 



35 River Road 
99 Central Street 
97 Lovejoy Road 
7 Argyle Street 
84 Summer Street 

44 Porter Road 
249 Andover Street 
95 Central Street 
12 Barrington Drive 
89 Chestnut Street 
18 Lockway Road 

15 Arcadia Road 
43 High Street 
33 High Street 
182 Jenkins Road 
37 Maple Avenue 
37 Maple Avenue 
65 Dascomb Road 

65 Dascomb Road 

2 Kenilworth Street 
6 Henderson Avenue 
11 Cheever Circle 
28 Phillips Street 
87 Cheever Circle 
18 Rolling Ridge Road 

18 Robandy Road 
57 Marilyn Road 

27 High Plain Road 

6 Juniper Road 

11 Ballardvale Road 

9 Smithshire Estate 

66 Wildwood Road 
83 North Street 
5 Stinson Road 

45 Ballardvale Road 
71 Central Street 
157 Hidden Road 

79 Lowell Jet. Road 

4 Carisbrooke Street 
55 Summer Street 

50 Ballardvale Road 
1 Stratford Road 

22 Greenwood Road 
87 Bartlet Street 

10 George Street 
120 Tewksbury Street 

7 Kirkland Drive 
189 Highland Road 

19 Kirkland Drive 
32 Dufton Road 

16 Cuba Street 
215 Lowell Street 
10 Thresher Road 
185 Greenwood Road 

23 Corbett Street 
91 Argilla Road 

53 Whittier Street 
74 Morton Street 

5 Highland Wayside 
233 Andover Street 

8 Cuba Street 

17 Lowell Street 

21 Tewksbury Street 
210 Main Street 
47 Lowell Street 



87 



Moody , Durwood W . 
Mulick, Stella S. 
Munroe, Jeannette G. 
Nadeau, Aime G. 
Neikirk, Robert S. 
Neikirk, Theresa M . 
Neumark, Arthur I. 
Newill, Lester T. 
Nicoll, Celia R. 
Nigrelli, Joseph 
O'Connor, Anna P. 
O'Connor, Charlotte A. 
O'Rourke, Charles D. 
Ortstein, Grace B. 
Otis, Herbert C. 
Partridge, Walter H. 
Patterson, Helen S. 
Pendleton, Andrew S. Jr 
Perry, Virginia M . 
Petrie, David R. 
Pike, Walter N. 
Piper, Gladys M . 
Poland, Frank S. 
Pratt, William C. Jr. 
Puma, Antonio 
Quinn, Richard D. 
Rafton, Helen G. 
Reason, Arthur W. 
Redman, George F. 
Reidy, John J. 
Robinson, David D. 
Rothwell, Eric 
Roundy , Virginia A. 
Ruhl , Malcolm J. 
Ryan, Patricia M. 
Sagaser, Donald D. 
Schirner, Dorothy M. 
Sewell, 0. Lesley 
Sheehy, Kathleen C. 
Sheeley, Russell F. 
Sherman, Frank J. Ill 
Shiebler, Mary R. 
Shorten, Mildred R. 
Silva, Dorothy K. 
Simpson, Edward F. 
Smyth, Charles W. 
Souter, Alfred F. 
Souter, John B. Jr. 
Spinney, Donald A. 
Stanley, Charles A. 
Stevenson, Frank B. 
Stewart, Aubery A. 
Sweet, Sherley M. Jr. 
Symonds, Eva M. 
Szabo, Peter F. 
Tabacco, Flora A. 
Tallmadge, Gilbert F. 
Tangney, Joseph J. 
Tapley, Fred J. 
Taylor, Edmund R. 
Teichert, Elsie M. 
Thompson, Lester M. 
Titcomb, Jessie M. 
Towne, Charles C. Jr. 
Valentine, William R. 



Pipefitter 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Industrial Engineer 

Elect. Engineer 

Housewife 

Sales Manager 

Asst. Superintendent 

Housewife 

Cost Accountant 

Tester 

Clerk 

Switchman 

Asst. Secretary 

Insurance Salesman 

Chief Engineer 

Housewife 

Manufacturer 

Housewife 

Company Representative 

Chemical Worker 

Housewife 

Metal Fabricator 

Sales Engineer 

Plant Manager 

School Bus Driver 

Housewife 

Superintendent 

General Manager 

Store Manager 

Arch Draftsman 

Asst. Superintendent 

Sales 

Proprietor 

Secretary 

Comm. Engineer 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Self-employed 

Elec. Engineer 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Cement Finisher 

Claims Supervisor 

Ins. Underwriter 

Inspector 

Branch Manager 

Veterans' Administration 

Marine Engineer 

Head Teller 

Training Supervisor 

Housewife 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Shoe Salesman 

Retired 

Retired 

Housewife 

Ind. Chemical Salesman 

Reg. Nurse 

General Manager 

Elect. Engineer 



34 Clark Road 

26 Cutler Road 
39 Salem Street 
156 High Street 
2 Beech Circle 

2 Beech Circle 
90 Elm Street 
18 Rennie Drive 

40C Washing. Park Drive 

27 Magnolia Avenue 
51 Magnolia Avenue 

3 Westwind Road 

61 Brookfield Road 

26 Vine Street 

90 Maple Avenue 

47 Bartlet Street 

17 High Plain Road 

11 Osgood Street 

218 Holt Road 

86 Poor Street 

82 Pine Street 

29 Canterbury Street 

9 Wildwood Road 

2 Cyr Circle 
75 Pine Street 

41 Tewksbury Street 
9 Alden Road 

7 Walker Avenue 
234 Highland Road 

17 Flint Circle 

11 Wild Rose Drive 

21 Bartlet Street 
11 Barrington Drive 

42 Walnut Avenue 
70B Morton Street 
56 Chestnut Street 
7 Lincoln Circle 
34 Summer Street 
241 Lowell Street 
183 Summer Street 

116 Main Street 
29a Maple Avenue 
53 Abbot Street 

22 Beech Circle 

11 Amherst Road 

117 Lowell Street 
1 Shipman Road 

32 Washington Avenue 

18 Pasho Street 

23 Pasho Street 

31 Chandler Circle 

6 Shepley Street 

3 Stinson Road 

4 Beech Circle 
111 Shawsheen Road 
15 Wild Rose Drive 

19 Johnson Road 

7 Dartmouth Road 
100^ Main Street 
6 Stevens Circle 

12 West Knoll Road 
19 Chandler Circle 
15 Chandler Circle 
21 Arundel Street 
56 Woburn Street 



88 



Vannett, William B. 
Vogt, Walter R. 
Webster, R. Kingman 
Welch, James P. Jr. 
West, Helen 
Wetterberg, Glennie 
Wilkinson, Marcia A, 
Willand, Allen B. 
Wilson, Barbara D. 
Wilton, Robert B. 
Winter, Harold 
Young, Earl A. 
Young, John C. 
Zink, Alvin J. Jr. 



Receiving Clerk 

Heating Contractor 

Vice-Pres . Production 

Machine Operator 

Housewife 

Invoice Analyst 

Housewife 

Supervisor 

Homemaker 

Insurance Agent 

Supervisor 

Accountant 

Department Chief 

Technical Manager 



6 Brechin Terrace 
99 High Street 
84 Argilla Road 

31 Memorial Circle 
70 Morton Street 
51 Summer Street 
Foster Pond Road 
92 Elm Street 

28 William Street 
Foster Pond Road 

32 Foster Circle 
10 Chandler Circle 
25 Coolidge Road 
21 Chester Street 




89 



DIRECTORY 
OF TOWN 
OFFICIALS 



ELECTIVE 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Philip K. Allen, Chairman - 1967 
William Stewart, Vice-Chairman - 1968 
Paul W. Cronin, Secretary - 1966 
Roger W. Collins - 1968 
Robert A. Watters - 1967 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Robert E. Sherman, Chair- 
man - 1967 
William A. Doherty - 1967 
Barbara Moody - 1966 
Virginia Cole - 1968 
Dr. Louis Galbiati - 1968 
Edward I. Erickson, Secy. 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY TRUSTEES, PUNCHARD FREE 
*Harold E. Coleman , Chairman SCHOOL 



Winston A. Blake - 1968 
Thomas P. Eldred - 1966 
Thomas R. Wallace - 1969 
John B. White, Jr. - 1970 



Edmond E. Hammond ** 
Fred W. Doyle - 1967 
Harry Sellars - 1967 
C. Carleton Kimball - 
Arthur W. Cole - 1967 
Rev. Frederick B. Noss 
Rev. J. Edison Pike 
Rev. Bruce Van Blair 



1967 



TOWN MODERATOR TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 

Arthur Williams - 1966 Frederick E. Cheever, 

Chairman - 1967 
Irving J. Whitcomb - 1968 
Arthur W. Cole - 1966 

* Appointed by State Housing Board ** Deceased 



REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE 
Fred S. Tarbox - 1967 



APPOINTIVE 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Robert M. Henderson, Chair- 
man 
Richard I . Anderson 
J. Everett Collins 
Glenn W. Inman 
Thomas S. Marjerison, Jr. 
Edward A. Romeo 
Allen M. Flye 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY TOWN 
BY - LAWS 
Robert S. Zollner 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Archibald D .Maclaren, Jr 

Chairman 
Phillips B. Marsden, Jr 
William H. Russell 



PLANNING BOARD 

Harold T. King, Chairman 

John N. Cole 

James H. Eaton 

James Trenholm 

Arthur Neumark (Member , 
Central Merrimack Valley 
Regional Planning Dist.) 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Alfred W. Fuller , Chairman 
Augustine P. Sheehy 
Sherley M. Sweet, Jr. 

Associate Members: 
Raymond LaRosa 
Jerome Andrews 
Virginia Hammond 



BOARD OF HEALTH 
Robert A. Walsh, Chairman 
John J. Wholey, M.D. 
Fay H. Elliott 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
Thayer S. Warshaw, Chairman 
Mrs. Milton J. Meyers 
George Hill 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
James D. Doherty , Chairman 
George E. Haselton 
Douglas N. Howe 
Richard W. Lally 
Eugene A. Bernardin, Jr. 
Arthur A. Collins 



TOWLE FUND TRUSTEES 
Mrs . Louis Anderson 
Geoffrey Glendinning 
George F . James 

BOARD OF RETIREMENT 
David L. Nicoll, Chairman 
Leo F. Daly 
Wendell A. Mattheson 
Edmond E. Hammond (De- 
ceased) 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION TRUSTEES -SPRING GROVE 
Heinrich Rohrbach, Chairman CEMETERY 
Albert R. Retelle, Secretary Frederick E. Cheever, 
Mrs. Waters Kellogg Chairman 

Frederick A. Stott Albert E . Curtis, Secretary 

Winthrop Newcomb Malcolm E. Lundgren 

Edward F. Cregg Irving J. Whitcomb 

Joseph L. Monan Edward P. Hall 



90 






INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 

Charles DeBell, Chairman 

Richard M. Sullivan 

Wolf Berthold 

Horace M. Poynter, Jr. 

Richard Brooks 

John R. McLeod 

David Duncan, Jr. 

Robert Phinney 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 
COMMITTEE 

Benjamin 0. Chase 

Mrs. Dudley Fitts , Secretary 

C. Lincoln Giles 

Frederick A. Higgins 

Robert Mclntyre, Chairman 

William E. Moriarty 

Walter N. Webster 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL 

LIBRARY 
Arthur Reynolds , Chairman 
Andrew A. Caffrey 
Leo F. Daly , Treasurer 
Elinore L. Washburn 
Edward I . Erickson 
Daniel Frishman 
Cornelia H. Fitts 



PLANNING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Joseph A. McCarthy 
Frank L. Brigham 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Harry Sellars 
Eugene A. Zalla 
Walter F. MacDonald 

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Harold T. King 
James A. McEvoy 
Frederick Flather, Jr. 
Francis J. Trombly 

PLANNING ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
(To assist Central Merrimack 
Valley Regional Planning 
District) 
James G . Poor 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 
Benj . Brown (American Leg.) Timothy Scanlon 
Elmer S. Ober(Vet. Service 

Agent) 
Cecil W. Garrod(V.F.W.) 
James Lynch (D.A.V.) 



Town Manager Richard J. Bowen 

Town Clerk Irving 0. Piper 

Town Accountant Wendell A. Mattheson 

Collector of Taxes James P. Christie 

Town Treasurer Anna M. Greeley, Esq. 

Town Counsel Frederic S. O'Brien, Esq. 

Police Chief David L. Nicoll 

Fire Chief Henry L . Hilton 

Executive Director, Andover 

Housing Authority James E. Manning 

Veteran's Service Agent ... .Elmer S. Ober 
Director of Public 

Assistance Paul I. MacMillan 

Highway Supt Stanley Chlebowski 

Water & Sewer Supt.... Donald C. Bassett 

Town Engineer John Avery 

Sealer of Weights & 

Measures Newton A . Jones 

Animal Inspector Richard D. Lindsay ,D V„M ( 

Game Warden Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. 

Civil Defense Director .. .Burton B. Batcheller 
Sanitary & Plumbing 

Inspector Walter R . Vogt 

Asst . Sanitary & Plumbing 

Inspector Harold Rutter, Jr. 



Gas Inspector Walter R. Vogt 

Milk & Health 

Inspector John J. Broderick 

Director of 

Public Health . .Elizabeth Nadeau,R.N. 
Town Physician ... John J. Wholey, M.D 
Inspector of 

Buildings Arthur Peatman 

Asst . Inspector of 

Buildings Kenneth Wade 

Inspector of Wires Alex Ritchie, Jr. 
Asst . Inspector of 

Wires Arthur Silva 

Dog Officer William T. Mosher 

Deputy Tree Warden. . .Philip A. Busby 
Supt. of Schools . .Edward I. Erickson 
School Department: 

Visual Consultant .Wm. V. Emmons, D.O. 

Dental Hygienist . . . .M. Augusta Breck 

Physician .. John J. McArdle , Jr.,M D. 

Attendance Of f icer . . . . Wm. F. Tammany 

Dentist Frank E. Himmer , D.M.D. 

Nurses Gertrude A. Stewart, R.N. 

Ruth E. Wescott, R.N. 

Town Constables Benjamin C. Brown 

Thomas P. Eldred 



LOCAL SELECTIVE SERVICE BOARD #62 



Joseph A. Horan, Chairman 
Thomas E. Cargill, Sr . , Secretary 
Martin J. Lawlor, Jr. 
Thomas W. Fallon 
James Deyermond 
Salvatore Basile, Government 
Appeal Agent 



200 Chandler Road, Andover 

Boxford Village, Boxford 

39 Highland Ave., North Andover 

58 Maple Ave . , Andover 

65 Andover St . , Andover 

15 Chandler Road, Andover 



91 



INDEX 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 25 

ASSESSORS 10 

AUDIT CERTIFICATION 62 

BALANCE SHEET 41 

BOARD OF APPEALS 15 

BORROWING CAPACITY 61 

BUILDING INSPECTION 20 

CENTRAL MERRIMACK VALLEY 
REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION 39 

CIVIL DEFENSE 19 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 14 

CORNELL FUND 44 

DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL 
COMMISSION 14 

DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 90 

DOG OFFICER 19 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR 20 

ENGINEERING 23 

EXPENDITURES 47 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 17 

HEALTH 24 

HIGHWAYS 21 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 40 

HOUSING AUTHORITY BALANCE SHEET 59 

JURY LIST 86 

LANDFILL 24 

Inside 
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL Front Cover 

LIBRARY 29 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 13 

PARKING METERS 38 

PARKS 22 

PLANNING BOARD 12 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 15 

PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 60 

RECEIPTS 45 

RECREATION 32 

RESERVE FUND 56 

RETIREMENT FUND 55 

REVENUE ACCOUNT 56 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 2 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 39 

SCHOOLS 28 

SELECTMEN 5 

SEWER PROJECT , APW - 46G 54 

SEWERS 23 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 38 

STREET LIGHTING 23 

TAX COLLECTOR 10 

TAX COLLECTOR'S RECEIPTS 58 

THE YEAR AHEAD 4 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 8 

TOWN CLERK 11 

TOWN COUNSEL 11 

TOWN MANAGER .-; 7 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES 63 

TOWN TREASURER 9 

TREASURER ' S' STATEMENTS 57 

TREES 22 

UNPAID TAXES 54 

VETERANS ' SERVICES 26 

WATER 35 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 20 

WELFARE 26 



92 



^Jown J-^iinlinq Co. 



^tndover, ir/ai 



HOW WELL DID YOU READ YOUR ANNUAL TOWN REPORT? 



1. "Founder's Day" in Andover is celebrated annualy on: 

□ July 4 □ June 20 □ May 6 



□ April 13 



There were 



Special Town Meetings in 1965. 



3. The major cause of fires in 1965 was: 

□ carelessness □ lightning 

4. Motor vehicle fatalities in 1965 numbered: 

□ 6 □ 1 no 



] spontaneous combustion 



a 2 



5. How many registered voters were there in Andover as of July 1, 1965? 

□ 960 □ 14,326 □ 8,373 □ 10,050 



6. The Town's assessed valuation in 1965 was more than 107 million. 
□ True □ False 



7. The Board of Appeals heard 
cases in 1965. 



□ 16 



□ 39 



□ 47 



□ 68 



8. Fire losses in 1965 were higher than in 1964. 

□ True □ False 

9. Civil Defense volunteers in 1965 were paid more than $100,000 for their 3,500 man hours of service. 

$ □ True □ False Hrs - □ True □ False 

10. Building permits for new buildings in 1965 totaled: 

□ 300 □ 197 □ 201 □ 263 

11. How many shade and ornamental trees were planted by the Town in 1965? 



12. The most common communicable disease reported to the Board of Health in 1965 was: 

Q Measles [JChickenpox Q Mumps ] Whooping Cough 

13. Hospitilization and medication expenditures for veterans were greater in 1965 than in 1964. 

□ True □ False 

14. Spanish is/is not presently taught in the Andover school system. 

15. The population of the Town of Andover according to the 1965 State Census was: 

□ 19,647 D 20,603 □ 21,651 □ 20,551 

16. The Memorial Hall Library addition is being built entirely with Town tax money raised by the 1965 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

□ True □ False 

17. Rainfall in Massachusetts in 1965 was the lowest since: 

□ 1949 □ 1849 □ 1749 □ 1649 

18. The Andover Housing Authority makes no payments to the Town of Andover for its property. 

□ True □ False 

19. When is the Annual Town Meeting held? . 

20. $ were spent in 1965 for conservation purposes. 



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We should count time by heart-throbs. 
He most lives 

Who thinks most . . . feels the noblest 
. . . acts the best." 



VNDOVER ANNUAL REPORT 1966 




Office Of The Town Manager 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 
March 1, 1967 



To the Citizens of Andover: 

Deeds, thoughts, feelings - the true measures of a Town's 
life, no less than that of a man. The extent to which they 
have meaning and significance in the life of the Town of 
Andover is a personal judgment. It is a judgment of all of 
the aspects of a community's life - social, economic, 
cultural, religious and political. 

In dealing with a segment of the political life of our Town, 
the 1966 Annual Town Report offers to each citizen the tangi- 
ble means by which criticisms can be made of the manner in 
which this part of the life of Andover has been conducted. 
It takes on added significance over reports of previous years 
for several reasons. 

It is being made available directly by mail to the taxpaying 
families of the Town of Andover. 

It is considerably shorter in terms of pages. The detailed 
minutes of the several Town Meetings are not included in the 
report. A synopsis of the significant actions taken at the 
meetings of 1966, however, is included. 

It is a pictorial report with emphasis placed on recording 
the events of the past with pictures and not just words. 

Despite these significant differences, there is no way that 
can be devised to make you read, no less examine, this re- 
port. It is a legal duty of your town officials to present 
it to you. Implicit in this requirement is the responsibili- 
ty of each and every citizen to use it as a basis for judging 
the effectiveness of town government in the past year. 

Your careful consideration of this report is invited as are 
your comments and suggestions. Without your participation 
in the conduct of the governmental affairs of the Town of 
Andover, we are, in fact, compelled to measure time in terms 
of years, of breaths and of figures on a dial. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard J. Bowen 
Town Manager 

RJB:rh 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 1967 





Annual Report of the Town of Andover 
for the 1966 Fiscal Year 

Prepared by 

The Town Manager as Directed by the Board of Selectmen 

Pursuant to the Provisions of Chapter 40, Section 49 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts and Article II, Section 4 of the By-Laws of the Town of Andover . 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL Inside Front Cover 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 2 

DEDICATION 4 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 5 

STAFF AGENCIES 13 

PUBLIC SAFETY 27 

PUBLIC WORKS 35 

SANITATION AND WASTE DISPOSAL 41 

PUBLIC HEALTH 43 

PUBLIC WELFARE 44 

VETERAN'S SERVICES 45 

SCHOOLS 46 

LIBRARY 49 

RECREATION 53 

WATER 55 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 59 

UNCLASSIFIED 59 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 62 

JURY LIST 83 

DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 87 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES OBTAINABLE UPON REQUEST FROM TOWN CLERK 



CREDITS 

Photographs Richard Graber 

Albert Cole 
Art Work Graphics of Andover 

Printing Town Printing, Andover 

Compiled and Edited by Richard J. Bowen 
Cover Poem Excerpt Philip James Bailey 

Festus (1839) Proem 




A 




TOWN MEETING: 

* CONVENED at one (1) regular and three (3) 
special meetings. 

* ATTRACTED 9,000 voters with 5,472 voting at 
the Municipal Election and 3,528 attending the 
business sessions of the several Town Meetings 

* APPROPRIATED from all sources - taxation, 
surplus and borrowing - $5,631,519.88. 

* APPROVED a property value equalization pro- 
gram using an appropriation of $40,000 for 
the employment of consultants. 

* VOTED in March to construct a new central 
fire station on Stevens Street and changed the 
site in October to the Tyer Rubber property on 
North Main Street with both actions ruled in- 
adequate by bond counsel to permit borrowing 
and thus construction. 

* AUTHORIZED and voted an appropriation of 
$250,000 for construction of the so-called "West 
Andover Water Loop". 

* DIRECTED that a survey be made as to the 
feasibility of restoring Pomps Pond. 

* ADOPTED overwhelmingly a comprehensive 
revision of the Town By-Laws 

* ADDED $700,000 to a previously approved 
$3.91 Million for the construction of the New 
Senior High School on Shawsheen Road. 

* APPROVED the acquistion of a site off Ban- 
croft Road for a proposed Southeast Element- 
ary School. 

* AUTHORIZED the acquisition by the Conser- 
vation Commission of the Davideit property off 
High Plain Road, West Andover. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN : 

* CONDUCTED twenty-five (25) regular and 
nine (9) special business meetings. 

* HELD two (2) Hatch Act hearings relating to 
the filling of wet lands. 

* SUPPORTED unanimously enactment of sales 
tax, electronic voting machine and pollution 
control financial grants legislation by the 
General Court. 

* FAVORED extension by the State of Route 
125 into the Lowell Junction industrial area. 

* ACQUIRED eighty-two (82) acres of land in 
West Andover for an elementary school site, 
seven (7) acres adjacent to the Senior High 



School site and the Shorten property on Park 
Street. 

* RECOMMENDED to the Town Meeting the 
acquisition of the Bancroft Road school site. 

* PARTICIPATED in discussions on the forma- 
tion of a regional pollution abatement district 
for the elimination of the discharging of un- 
treated sewage into the Merrimack River. 

* SELECTED the late James P. Christie as the 
recipient of the first annual William Rhoads 
Memorial given to the Town Employee-of-the- 
Year. 

* ESTABLISHED and made the first presenta- 
tions on Founders Day of Certificates of Ser- 
vice to citizens of the Town who have served on 
the various and several Town boards, commit- 
tees and commissions. 

* APPROVED the creation of the Historical Dis- 
trict Study Committee. 

* CONFIRMED the appointments made by the 
Town Manager to the Andover Council on 
Aging. 

* VOTED to remove parking meters on Main 
Street between Punchard Avenue and Elm 
Street on an experimental basis to determine 
the extent of willingness of parkers to "honor" 
posted parking limits. 

* DEVELOPED criteria for selection of school 
sites. 

TOWN DEPARTMENTS REPORT: 

* FILING of suit by several citizens of the Town 
challenging the validity of the Town by-law re- 
quiring Finance Committee approval of money 
articles presented to special town meetings. 

* TRANSFER by the Finace Committee of 
$24,780.46 from the Reserve Fund to meet un- 
anticipated departmental expenses during the 
year. 

* PARTICIPATION by the Town Manager in 
discussion on the formation of the Greater 
Lawrence Pollution Abatement District. 

* ATTENDANCE at Vice-President Hubert H. 
Humphrey's Washington Conference with City 
and Town Managers July 28 and 29. 

* ADOPTION of new and higher water rates ap- 
proximating 30% over previous rates so as to 
place the water system on a self-sustaining basis. 



RELAXATION of water use restrictions. 
START of construction of $4.61 Million Se- 
nior High School. 

SELECTION of William Warner of Providence, 
Rhode Island as architect for the Southeast Ele- 
mentary School 

APPOINTMENT of Myron H. Muise as Tax 
Collector. 

INSTALLATION and utilization of computer 
in Town Accountant's office. 
SALE of $5.5 Million in municipal bonds. 
REALIZATION of $133,201.4-9 in interest by 
Town Treasurer through judicious manage- 
ment of Treasury in the investment of idle 
Town funds. 

TAX COMMITTMENT of $4,472,030.17 and 
collection of $4,311,035.98. 
ASSESSMENT increase over 1965 of 
$6,878,300. 

INAUGURATION of property value equaliza- 
tion program through selection of appraisal 
firm of Whipple, Darcey and Magane, Andover 
CLOSING of thirteen (13) cases by Town 
Counsel and the settling of four (4) claims 
against the Town out of court. 
THIRTY-EIGHT (38) court appearances by 
Town Counsel. 

REGISTRATION of 10,580 voters. 
RECORDING of 329 births, 163 deaths and 
178 marriages by the Town Clerk. 
APPROVAL by the Planning Board of ten (10) 
subdivisions containing 123 lots. 
EXPANSION of Central Merrimack Valley 
Regional Planning District to include the City 
of Haverhill and the Town of Merrimac. 
INSTALLATION of a new heating system in 
Ballardvale Community Center. 
ACQUISITION of eighteen (18) acres of land 
by Conservation Commission, the first land ac- 
quired by the Town of Andover for conserva- 
tion purposes. 

INITIATION of soil survey by U.S. Soil Con- 
servation Service. 

OPENING of Allied Chemical facilities on 
Dascomb Road. 

SURVEY of Andover citizens 60 years of age 
and older including one citizen 104 years of age 



* ISSUANCE of 525 building permits valued at 
$8.3 Million. 

* TREATMENT with asphalt of approximately 
43 miles of Town roadways. 

* PLANTING of 200 trees to replace 150 trees 
principally elms removed by Tree Department. 

* ADDITION of thirty-two (32) street lights. 

* ACQUISITION and use of new bulldozer at 
Town Landfill. 

* ELIMINATION OF OPEN BURNING at 
Landfill. 

* DROP in communicable disease and tuberculo- 
sis cases. 



RECEIPT of 3,273 police complaints. 
441 MOTOR VEHICLE accidents, of which 
three (3) were fatal involving four (4) per- 
sons, 200 personal injuries and 238 property 
damage only. 

INVESTIGATION of 104 breakings and enter- 
ings as compared with 79 in 1965. 
CARELESSNESS as major cause of fires. 
MAINTENANCE of 40,000 shelter spaces in 
Town Civil Defense program. 



ENROLLMENT of 4,850 children in Andover 
Schools. 

UPDATING by School Committee at cost of 
$500 of so-called "Crimp" Report. 
REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL enroll- 
ment for day classes of 39 Andover pupils. 
PLANNING of addition to Regional Vocation- 
al School. 

COMPLETION and occupancy of addition to 
Memorial Hall Library. 

DREDGING of small portion of Pomps Pond. 
REGISTRATION of 600 children in Summer 
Swimming Instruction Program with 200 re- 
ceiving appropriate certificates. 
COMPLETION of Fish Brook water project. 
PUMPING of more than 120 million gallons of 
water from Fish Brook to Haggetts Pond. 
DRILLING of 52 test wells to determine the 
availability of suitable additional ground water 
supply. 

PREPARATION of plans for addition of 40 
units to Housing for the Elderly project. 



COLLECTOR 



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TAXES 

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MOM ' f 



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CL SEO SAT. 





In Jim Christie's seventy years is found a 
measure of a portion of the life of the Town of 
Andover. In spite of and really because of his 
quiet and unassuming way, the deeds of his pub- 
lic service which culminated in his selection in 
1966 as Town Employ ee-of -the-Y ear-the thoughts 
of his presence in the Cochran Chapel at the an- 
nual performance of Handel's "Messiah" — his at- 
tendance at Phillips Andover-Exeter football 
games and BAA track meets — the feelings in his 
endeavors for somebody else, especially younger 



and more aspiring Town athletes — are remem- 
bered at his recent death. They are marked by 
the dedication of this Annual Report to his mem- 
ory. 

Upon his retirement on October 31,1966, as 
Tax Collector of the Town of Andover for some 
twenty-eight years, his friends and fellow-work- 
ers presented Jim with a gift in the form of a 
Gaelic Messing which concluded, "... and until 
we meet again, Jim, may God hold you in the 
palm of His hand." 

JAMES P. CHRISTIE 
1896-1967 



Town Meeting 

The Town Meeting is the legislative and, therefore, the 
policy-making body for the Town of Andover. Its mem- 
bers consist of all of the qualified voters of the Town. It 
convenes at least annually in March to elect the Town's 
municipal officers — Moderator, Selectmen, School Com- 
mittee members, Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical High School Committee member, elected Trus- 
tees of the Puncliard Free School, Andover Housing Au- 
thority, and Trustees of the Cornell Fund, as their terms 
expire. An extension of the regular Annual Town Meet- 
ing or an "adjourned" meeting occurring within one week 
of election adopts the annual Midget, makes all other ap- 
propriations ond enacts by-laws. It convenes in special 
sessions upon call of the Board of Selectmen to consider 
and to act upon matters which require immediate atten- 
tion and presumably could not be postponed until the 
regular Town Meeting. 

Andover's legislative body convened no less 
than four times during 1966 — one regular Town 
Meeting in March and three special Town Meet- 
ings in March, October, and November. A grand 
total of approximately 9,000 voters participated in 
these meeings including the municipal election 
in March at which some 5,742 votes were cast. 
The annual business session and the three special 
meetings attracted some 2,600 voters, or an aver- 
age of approximately 650 per meeting. There were 
in 1966 10,580 registered voters and, therefore, 
Regular Town Meeting members. 

The March meeting approved total expendi- 
tures for all purposes and from all sources taxa- 
tion, use of Reserve Funds and borrowing — in 
the amount of $6,631,519.88. Of this amount 
$5,379,093.00 was to be raised by taxation, 
$960,000.00 by bonding, and the balance from 
available funds. In considering and acting upon 
the 65 articles in the Annual Town Meeting War- 
rant, some significant actions were taken upon 
approval of the current year's fiscal program. 

In order to continue the maintenance of a 
sound tax base and to insure that each property 
would continue to carry its fair share of the tax 
burden, Town Meeting approved the sum of 
$40,000.00 for a property value equalization pro- 
gram by an outside consultant. This program will 
be completed for use for tax purposes in 1967. 

Approval was also given to construction of a 
$500,000.00 fire station to be located on Stevens 
Street. This action was subsequently rescind- 
ed at the October Special Town Meeting and the 
location changed to the Tyer Rubber property on 



[\ 



North Main Street. This latter action, which 
also would call for bonding, was ruled to be de- 
fective by bond counsel. Thus, despite two appro- 
vals in 1966 for the construction of a fire station 
to replace the present antiquated facility, no pro- 
gress can be reported as having been made. It is 
anticipated that the Board of Selectmen will pre- 
sent this matter once again to the Town Meeting 
in 1967. 

Favorable action was also taken on additional 
steps to provide a long-range solution to the 
Town's water supply problems. The sum of 
$225,000.00 was voted for the development of 
wells if subsurface water could be found in suf- 
ficient quantity to justify the program. Despite 
extensive surveys to locate ground water, the 
well authorization was not, nor will it be used. 
The well tests proved to be unsatisfactory. 

The sum of $250,000.00 was appropriated for 
the construction of a water loop in the West An- 
dover area. The primary purpose of this project 
would be to provide more adequate water flow to 
meet fire insurance requirements, primarily for 
the industrially zoned area in West Andover. This 
project will be completed in 1967 with contracts 
to be awarded in February. 

Upon recommendation of the Board of Se- 
lectmen two significant conservation measures 
were approved by the voters. The sum of $15,000 
was allocated for survey work to determine what 
could be done to improve the Pomps Pong swim- 
ming area at the Andover Recreation Park. A con- 
servation fund was also created with the appro- 
priating of $10,000.00 for use by the Conser- 
vation Commission in the acquisition of land for 
open space purposes. 

The Town Meeting also gave approval for 
amendments to the Town Building Code particu- 
larly as they related to fire safety; amended the 
Zoning Bylaw to strengthen the off-street parking 
requirements for development in the central busi- 
ness district; approved higher building permit 
fees so as to permit the Building Department to 
function on a self-sustaining basis ; registered its 
approval of a forty-unit addition to the Housing 
for the Elderly Project. 

One of the more significant matters brought 
before the Annual Town Meeting was the revision 
of the Town Bylaws. This represented the first 
comprehensive revision of the Town's legal rules 
and regulations. A one-member committee in the 
form of Robert S. Zollner, Esq., functioned over 



a period of some five years in bringing this signi- 
ficant project to fruition. The Bylaw revision was 
approved unanimously by the Town Meeting. 

Some ten days after the regular Town Meet- 
ing a special session convened on call of the Board 
of Selectmen to consider the appropriating of ad- 
ditional funds for the construction of the Senior 
High School project approved in 1964. The 
$700,000.00 which was approved resulted in a 
$4,610,000.00 project. The Board of Select- 
men was also authorized to acquire land in 
Southeast Andover and in West Andover presum- 
ably for school sites. These were the Taft and 
Glowacki properties at Gray and Tucker Roads 
and the Stevens and Demers properties at High 
Plain Road and Cross Street. Approval was also 
given for the filing of an application for a public 
works planning advance with the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Development for the 
anticipated addition to the new Senior High 
School, including an auditorium. 

The October 3rd Special Meeting considered 
and rejected the acquisition of the so-called Lally 
property in Elm Square for use as a Town Hall 
building site. A similar action was taken on th e 
acquisition of a school site for Southeast Andover 
.in the vicinity of the Bancroft Reservoir. This 
latter action was approved by a majority of the 
voters, but the law requires a two-thirds majority. 
Some fifteen votes were lacking to meet this re- 
quirement. As indicated previously, the Town 
Meeting did approve the acquisiton of the so-call- 
ed Tyer Rubber property as a building site and 
presumably as a fire station site. The Town Meet- 
ing also gave approval to the acquisition by the 
Conservation Commission of the Davideit proper- 
ty off High Plain Road in the vicinity of Fish 
Brook. This action is of particular significance 
since it represents the first acquisition by the 
Town of Andover of land for conservation pur- 
poses. 

Upon recommendation of the Board of Select- 
men and Finance Committee $6,500.00 was voted 
for engineering work and property appraisals in 
order to prepare plans for raising the level of 

Haggetts Pond. 

In November Town Meeting was asked once 
again t© approve the purchase of a school site for 
Southeast Andover in the vicinity of Bancroft 
Reservoir. This time it was approved. 

To suggest even remotely that the Town 
Meeting had a busy year in 1966 would win an 
award for being the understatement of the year. 



Moderator 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Part-time 1 

$75 

$.0003 



Elected annually, the Town Moderator is 
the presiding officer of Town Meetings. His de- 
cisions as to procedure at such meetings are final 
and binding. He also appoints members of the 
Town Finance Committee. 



THE MODERATOR RECOGNIZES 





I AM OPPOSED TO 




MR. MODERATOR, I HAVE A QUESTION. 
WHAT IS PROPOSED IS THE REZONING OF 





MR. MODERATOR AND FELLOW CITIZENS . MY NAME IS 




THEY MUST BE TALKING ABOUT ARTICLE 




I'LL HAVE A HAM AND CHEESE 



ITS BEEN A LONG, LONG DAY. 



Finance Committee 



Finance Committee 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$900 
$.0036 



Appointed by the Moderator for three-year 
staggered terms, the seven-member FINCOM 
functions as the "watch-dog" agency over Toivn 
finances. It receives and makes recommendations 
on the Annual Budget as submitted by the Town 
Manager. It also considers and comments on all 
other financial matters or articles which comes 
before the Toivn Meeting. No request for the 
appropriation of funds may be considered by a 
special Toivn Meeting without first having been 
approved by the Finance Committee. The FIN- 
COM also controls the Reserve Fund established 
by a Town Meeting and from which transfers 
may be made to meet situations unforeseen at the 
time of preparation and adoption of the Annual 
Budget. 



The Finance Committee met periodically 
during the year to review progress of the Town 
administration in finance. It approved the trans- 
fer of $24,780.46 from the Reserve Fund to var- 
ious Town departments to meet necessary but un- 
foreseen expenses. These emergency situations in- 
cluded salaries for retirement administration in- 
advertently omitted from the 1966 budget; 
$5,000.00 for test well drilling in determining the 
availability of ground water ; a replacement heat- 
ing system for the Ballardvale Community Center 
costing $2,500.00 ; $2,000.00 for snow removal ; and 
eleven other expense requirements as detailed in 
the financial section of this Town Report. 

The Finance Committee Chairman maintain- 
ed periodic contact with and was consulted by the 
Town Manager on financial matters. He partici- 
pated in the favorable sale of $5.5M in bonds 
in March. 



Board of Selectmen 



Although the Finance Committee's batting av- 
erage in 1966 was slightly lower than its custom- 
ary 1,000, townspeople continued to show their 
confidence in the recommendations made by the 
Committee at the several town meetings during 
the year. All of the recommendations of the Fin- 
Com on financial matters were approved by the 
voters at the regular Town Meeting and the Spec- 
ial Meetings of March 22 and November 21. Only 
the Committee's favorable recommendation on the 
use of the Lally property as a Town Hall site at 
the October 3 Special Town Meeting was rejected. 

The Committee's authority to approve money 
articles at special town meetings in accordance 
with a Town By-Law of some years' standing was 
challenged in a court action brought by several 
taxpayers in November, 1966. The by-law as pre- 
viously approved by the voters provides that any 
article calling for the appropriation of funds at a 
special town meeting may be considered by the 
meeting only if it receives a favorable recommen- 
dation from the Finance Committee. It was enact- 
ed as a safeguard against the "packing" of spe- 
cial meetings in favor of money matters for the 
bene'fit of usually small but organized special in- 
terest groups. At the writing of this report no' de- 
cision has been made on the merits of the case by 
the courts. A court did, however, refuse to issue 
an injunction which would have created serious 
problems at the November 21 Special Town Meet- 
ing. 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Part-time 5 

Plus Secretary 

$3,836 

1%{ 



The five-member Board of Selectmen is the 
Toivn' s licensing authority and a supervising 
agency in terms of overseeing the implementa- 
tion of policies adopted by the Toivn Meeting. It 
appoints the Town Accountant, Zoning Board of 
Appeals, Planning Board of- Appeals, officers and 
registrars of voters and the Town Manager. The 
Board is responsible for supervising the Town 
Manager in the faithful discharge of his duties 
and responsibilities. All appointments by the Town 
Manager are subject to approval by the Board. 
Its most significant role is that of recommending 
policy to the Town Meeting, especially on matters 
relating to community development. Selectmen, are- 
elected to three-year terms of office. 



A detailed accounting of the activities of the 
Board of Selectmen in 1966 would reak like a 
diary of the governmental activity of all of the 
departments of the Town and the many other in- 
fluences on the Andover community. In perhaps no 
other office of the Town of Andover is as much 
considered and acted upon, although frequently 
critixisms of the Board are too often made in 
terms of the few things not done rather than the 
more numerous accomplishments. 



Town Hall 

One of the more perplexing problems faced 
by the Selectmen in the past year was that relat- 
ing to the housing of the Town Offices, Police De- 
partment, and Central Fire Station. It was con- 
sidered frequently in the twenty-five (25) regular 
and nine (9) special meetings of the Board in the 
course of the year. Use of the so-called Lally pro- 
perty in Elm Square as a site for the Town Hall 
was supported by the Board and presented to the 
October 3 Special Town Meeting. Townspeople 
disagreed with the Board's position and despite 
support from the Planning Board and Finance 
Committee disapproved the appropriating of 
funds to undertake the project. In spite of efforts 
by the Board and an approval by the same meet- 
ing, the Central Fire Station is delayed until an- 
other vote and approval by a Town Meeting is ob- 
tained because of imperfections in the Town 
Meeting's original vote. The Police Station hinges 
on the decisions made on locatiing the Town Hall 
and Fire Station. 

The most unfortunate fault of the Board, if 
indeed it can be so described, has been its honest 
and conscientious desire to reflect in its consider- 
ations not only the most economical choice of 
sites but a location acceptable to the greatest num- 
ber of Townspeople. The Board recognizes that it 
has established criteria which are virtually im- 
possible to meet. It is anticipated, therefore, that 
prior to the 1967 Annual Town Meeting the Board 
will have made, or recommended, the decisions 
necessary to permit these inportant projects to go 
forward without further delays. 

In terms of routine business the Board con- 
ducted ten hearings prior to the granting of 
gravel permits and three hearing under the terms 
of the so-called "Hatch Act." This particular act 
is of great significance to Andover since for the 
first time the Town has been granted some con- 
trol over the manner in which the wet lands in the 
Town may be used. Subject to approval by the 
State Department of Natural Resources the Se- 
lectmen can regulate to the point of prohibiting 
the disturbing of any wet land particularly as it 
might affect the Town's water supply. The Board 
did, in fact, deny two petitions, both of which 
would have had a detrimental effect on Fish 
Brook. 
Support Given 

Support was given by the Board to several 
bills being considered by the General Court. Re- 
cognizing the need for increased State financial 
assistance and some relief to the overburdened 



property taxpayer, the Board unanimously sup- 
ported the enactment of the Governor's limited 
sales tax. Experience in 1966 proved beyond ques- 
tion that wothout such assistance the Town 
would have been faced with a higher property 
tax. The Board also registered its favorable sup- 
port of legislation which would have permitted 
the use of electronic voting machines in Town 
elections. Unfortunately, the bill died in the 
Senate. It is to be presented once again in 1967 
and will be supported as strongly as possible by 
the Selectmen. 

The Board also appeared on behalf of a bill 
which ultimately passed the House but died in the 
Senate which would have extended Route 125 in a 
northerly direction to intersect with Lowell 
Junction Road. This significant project would 
have opened up more than five hundred acres of 
prime industrial land in the Town of Andover as 
well as a similar amount in Wilmington. This bill 
will also be presented once again in 1967. 

A great deal of time was spent in negotiating 
the purchase of the so called Tyer Rubber pro- 
perty, and despite an agreed-upon price, the Board 
could not consummate the sale because of legal 
problems surrounding the vote of the Town which 
authorized the purchase as well as some matters 
relating to the title of the property. 

Several meetings were held during the course 
of the year with officials of the City of Lawrence 
and the Towns of Methuen and North Andover on 
formation of a regional water pollution abatement 
district. In addition, one member of the Board of 
Selectmen, Robert A. Watters, along with the 
Town Manager represented the Town as members 
of a subcommittee which sought an answer to this 
critical problem. Despite a great deal of time, ef- 
fort, and energy, the Regional Pollution Abate- 
ment District has been placed in a state of limbo. 
The problem remains with us, and the Board 
will be required to devote a great deal more time 
in arriving at a solution which will be recommend- 
ed to the Town. 

Of perhaps even more critical importance 
during the past year was the continued water 
shortage. The Board recommended and the Fin- 
ance Committee made a transfer of $5,000.00 in 
order to undertake an extensive test well drilling 
survey to determine the availability of suitable 
quantities and qualities of ground water to sup- 
plement the Town's water supply system. Con- 
sideration was also given to preparation of plans 
and specifications for a replacement reservoir for 
the existing Bancroft Reservoir. It is expected 



that the 1967 Annual Town Meeting will be re- 
quested to consider and to approve this project. 

Included among the other many activities of 
the Board of Selectmen during the past year was 
the very pleasant opportunity to concur with the 
Memorial Hall Library Board of Trustees and the 
Town Manager in the naming of the reading room 
of the library addition in honor of Miss Miriam 
Putnam. The Board found additional pleasure in 
creating an Employee's Award in memory of Bill 
Rhoads, the spark plug of the 1965 Founder's Day. 
The first award was made to the late Jim Chris- 
tie, Andover's long-time Tax Collector. Certifi- 
cates of Service were also given for the first time 
to citizens of the Town who had completed their 
service as members of the several Town boards, 
committees, or commissions. This practice will be 
continued and represents a small measure of the 
gratitude of the Selectmen on behalf of the Town 
for the dedicated service of these many volunteers. 

The Board also in 1966 approved the creation 
of a local Community Action Council as well as 
the Town's participation as members of the Grea- 
ter Lawrence Community Action Council. Al- 
though the Town of Andover will be eligible for 
only modest participation in the federal Poverty 
Program, involvement in the Greater Lawrence 
program assures continuation of benefits to re- 
sidents of the Greater Lawrence area. 

Periodic contacts were made by the Board 
with the Town's State Representatives and par- 
ticularly with Congressman F. Bradford Morse. 
As the problems of the Town of Andover incra 



in scope and complexity, the maintenance of close 
and favorable working relationships with these 
Representatives takes on ever-increasing import- 
ance. This is particularly true of relations with 
the Town's Congressional Representative. 

The Selectmen recognized the importance of 
preserving the historical character of the Town 
in the appointing of the Historic District Study 
Committee. It is expected that this committee will 
submit a report to the Selectmen outlining the 
need for and steps to be followed in development 
of a program for preserving historic buildings 
and sites in the Town. 

Along with all of the above and many other 
activities of the Board, the Selectmen continued 
to function as a licensing board in supervising 
the issuance of alcoholic beverage licenses. 

One of the more noteworthy and beneficial 
decisions of the Board was that of authorizing the 
removal of on-street parking meters on Main St. 
This was conceived as an experiment to determine 
the extent to which townspeople could discipline 
themselves in parking their vehicles while con- 
ducting their business in downtown Andover. To 
date this experiment has been a great success. It 



IT WAS A GOOD PLAN EVEN THOUGH IT LOST AT TOWN 
MEETING - HAROLD KING, PLANNING BOARD CHAIRMAN 





% 






\ \ 



Town Manager 



would appear that action will be taken by the 
Board to remove all on-street parking meters. 

As authorized by the Town Meeting, the in- 
firmary property on Carmel Road was sold to Ed- 
win F. Bell of Methuen. The Board also appoint- 
ed Donald Bassett to serve as Andover's repre- 
sentative on the advisory board of the Ipswich 
River Watershed District. 

Of all the duties during the past year, none 
was more significant than that of the calling of 
three Special Town Meetings in addition to the 
Annual Meeting. With the exception of the Lally 
property article the Board's recommendations as 
presented to the Town Meetings were adopted. 
In recognition of the ever-changing character 
and makeup of the Town, the Board supported the 
creation of the Local Council on Aging. Its ap- 
pointment by the Town Manager with the ap- 
proval of the Board represented a positive step 
towards the development of plans and programs 
for one of the most valuable assets of the Town 
of Andover - its older citizens. Several significant 
planning matters also required the Board's time. 
Referred to the Planning Board were proposals 
to develop a long range sanitary sewer improve- 
ment program and a "capped" sewer require- 
ment in the Town's subdivision regulations. The 
Selectmen also participated in the development of 
a long range ten-point program for the continued 
development and improvement of the downtown 
business area. This will serve as a guide to the pre- 
paration and implementation of physical plans for 
this vital area of the Andover Community. 
Pollution Legislation 

The Board registered its strong support and 
approval of State legislation adopted by the Gen- 
eral Court which provides for substantial State 
assistance in anti- (water) pollution projects. 

Land acquisition consumed a great deal of 
time and effort of the Board in 1966. Approxi- 
mately eighty-two (82) acres was acquired by 
eminent domain in West Andover for use as a 
school site. A seven-acre parcel was acquired on 
Shawsheen Road adjoining the Senior High 
School site. The Board also acquired the so-called 
Shorten property on Park Street which gives to 
the Town ownership and control of the full block 
between Main and Bartlet Streets. 

Although requiring two attempts, the Board 
received authorization to acquire approximately 
twenty-five (25) acres of land in Southeast An- 
dover for an elementary school site. Work 
continues in seeking negotiated purchases of the 
parcels of land involved. 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Full-time 2 

Part-time 1 

$26,406 

^0<k 



The Toivn Manager is the chief adminis- 
trative officer of the Town of Andover. His pow- 
ers and duties are spelled out in detail in the 
Town Charter adopted by the voters of the Town \ 
of Andover in 1957. He appoints and supervises 
all town employees, boards and committees, ex- 
cept those officials who are elected or appointed 
by the Finance Committee, Moderator, Board of 
Selectmen and School Committee. These appoint- 
ments are subject to confirmation by the Board of 
Selectmen. He is the Purchasing Agent for the 
Town. He is also the Town's chief fiscal officer 
which position includes responsibilities for the 
preparation of the Town's Annual Budget. The 
Town Manager is also responsible for the main- 
tenance and repair of all Town property except 
schools. He is also responsible for the preparation 
of plans and the supervision of all construction, 
reconstruction, alterations and improvements of 
all public buildings, including schools. 



Sewers, Schools and Water - These words 
more than any others would describe the Town 
Manager's major areas of activity during the past 
twelve (12) months. As a representative with Se- 
lectman Watters to the Greater Lawrence Water 
Pollution Abatement Committee, a great deal of 
time, effort, energy and some imagination were 
expended in order to devise both political en- 
gineering plans for the discontinuation of the 
dumping of sewage into the Merrimack River. It 
appeared at one time during the year that accept- 
able plans were about to be adopted by the City 
of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, North 
Andover and Methuen which would have permit- 
ted the development of a specific time table for the 
undertaking and completing of regional sewerage 
treatment facilities. Unfortunately, it was found 
impossible to satisfy the City of Lawrence and 
further planning was discontinued until the City 
could make up its mind. There appears to be little 
question that a regional facility is feasible both 
from technical and financial points of view. Poli- 
tical questions remain to be solved and will hinder 
further planning until resolved OR the several 
municipalities are ordered by the State and Fed- 
eral governments to discontinue the time-honored 



li 



practice of polluting the Merrimack. 

The Town Manager made every effort to keep 
himself and the Town informed of State and 
Federal legislation relating to pollution and con- 
ferred frequently with the office of Congressman 
Morse. In addition, it was possible for the Manager 
to attend Vice-President Hubert H. Humphrey's 
conference with City and Town Managers on July 
28 and 29 in Washington, D.C. This two-day 
meeting afforded municipal administrators 
throughout the country direct contact with 
high-ranking Federal officials including cab- 
inet officers who are involved in programs 
sponsored by the Federal government for local 
government. These include the Poverty Program 
(OEO Director Shriver), Economic Development 
(Commerce Secreatary Connor), Housing and 
Urban Development (Secretary Weaver) as well 
as Vice-President Humphrey himself who has 
been designated by President Lyndon B. Johnson 
to work closely with local officials in solving the 
many and complex problems of urban America. 
The conference was found to be most worthwhile 
especially in terms of having been able to establish 
contacts. 

Although the drought continued into 1966, 
substantial relief was found with the completion 
of the Fish Brook project during the Spring. De- 
spite pressure, water use restrictions were con- 
tinued in force by the Town Manager until there 
were reasonable and safe assurances that the 
Town's water supply had been replenished suf- 
ficiently to permit their modification. This was 
done in the late Spring by allowing ulimited use 
of water on alternate days of the week in alter- 
nate areas of the Town. This practice proved to 
be successful although at times it appeared that 
more stringent restrictions would have to imposed 
as a consequence of problems with several of the 
Town's wells. It appears quite likely that restric- 
tions will not be required in 1967 since Fish Brook 
promises more than enough water to fill Haggett's 
Pond to overflowing. Few major projects have 
brought more satisfaction to the Town Manager 
and Water Superintendent especially since its un- 
dertaking had been recommended many, many 
years before the drought. 

School construction, planning and site acqui- 
sition required much of the Town Manager in 
1966. After acquiring $700,000.00 in additional 
funds, contracts were let and construction started 
on the new Senior High School. It is anticipated 
that it will be completed on schedule and in time 
for use in September 1967. The project has not 




A SUBJECT OF GREAT CONCERN IN 1966 



Central Services 

Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



1 
$13,919 

51 



been without its difficulties and but for the de- 
dicated work of the Building Committee, the 
Townspeople and the Almighty the project would 
not be at its present point of construction. De- 
velopment of school site selection criteria was a 
significant project completed by the Manager in 
1966. It was found that the Town did not have 
nor had it ever used any objective and selective 
approach in the acquisition of land for school pur- 
poses other than the site being located in the 
general area required by the School Committee. 
The new criteria include site characteristics (i.e. 
- soil quality, load bearing capacity, drainage), 
acquisition versus development costs and location 
in terms of proximity and convenience of the 
school population to be served. Having been est- 
ablished in choosing the Southeast Andover Ele- 
mentary School site they will be used in evaluat- 
ing future additional sites. 

Appropriation accounting and payroll conver- 
sions were accomplished without major difficul- 
ties. Preparation of year-end W2 forms will be 
possible. Water billing and accounting represented 
problems which will be solved in 1967. Revenue 
accounting will also be effected in the year ahead. 
Tax billing and accounting will be delayed until 
1968. 

Office space limitations continued to be dif- 
ficult during the year and of necessity had an ef- 
fect on departmental operations. 



12 




LJ 




WELCOMES ANDOVER'S NEW COLLECTOR, MYRON MUISE 



Town Accountant 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Full-time 4 

Part-time 1 

$40,406 

16^ 



The Town Accountant is appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen. He is a fulltime Town em- 
ployee and is responsible for the maintenance of 
all accounting records related to receiving and 
disbursing of Town funds. He conducts pre and 
post-audits of all Town expenditures. His cert- 
ification as to the availability of funds is required 
on all contracts including purchase orders made 
by the Town. His accounts are audited annually 
by the Bureau of Accounts, State Department 
of Corporations and Taxation. 



To suggest that the Town Accountant had a 
busy and eventful year would be the flimsiest of 
understatements. With the installation of a 
NCR Series 500 computer in November of 1965, 
the Town Accountant began the 1966 year with 
one of the most modern accounting installations 
available. It was with great expectations that 
work began in the past year in making the neces- 
sary changes to take full advantage of the equip- 
ment. Despite extensive preparations prior to the 
arrival of the computer and almost unconscious- 
able amounts of time spent by the Town Ac- 
countant and his assistant Mrs. Barbara Botsch 
during the course of the year to maximize its use, 
the end of the year came without previously est- 
ablished goals having been met. The Department 
would be less than candid were it not to make 
this admission. It does not represent a failure but 
merely a delay. The contempleted system is what 
the Town needs, and, subject solely to the limita- 
tions of staff, will meet the Town's ever-increas- 
ing financial accounting requirements. 



Tax Collector 




Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



3 
$21,578 



In actuality, the. so-called. "Tax" Collector is 
the Town Collector and has the legal authority to 
receive all town monies including taxes, depart- 
mental service charges, water bills, and other 
similar town receipts. He is appointed by the 
Town Manager for an indefinite term of office. 
The Collector prepares certificates of municipal 
liens and betterment discharges. 

The late James P. Christie, Tax Collector of 
some twenty-eight years' standing, retired on 
November 1, 1966. During his last month of ser- 
vice the present Tax Collector understudied him. 
In many respects the collector's office func- 
tioned little differently in 1966 over previous 
years. It appears that many taxpayers labor under 
a misconception as to the use which Motor Vehicle 
Excise Tax monies are put. Although the rate is 
established by the State, the funds are collected 
and retained by the Town for use in the support 
of Town services. 

The following represents the 1966 tax com- 
mitments and collections: 

Committed Total $4,472,030.17 

Collected : 

Real Estate $3,504,436.79 

Personal Property 168,632.28 

Motor Vehicle 562,208.15 

All Other 75,758.76 

Total $4,311,035.98 



13 



Town Treasurer 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Full-time 2 

Part-time 1 

$19,891 

7f. 



The Toit'ti Treasurer is the custodian of all 
Town funds. The position is charged with receiv- 
ing for custodial purposes all of the monies due, the 
Town and disburses them in accordance with 
warrants signed by the Town Accountant and 
Town Manager. Bid deposits and Performance 
Bonds on Town contracts are held by the Trea- 
surer. The Treasurer is also required, to execute 
notes and bonds for borrowed money and to re- 
ceive and disburse trust funds in accordance with 
poivers granted to said Treasurer. The office is 
also responsible for the disbursement of Retire- 
ment funds, the maintenance of Tax Title Ac- 
counts and the processing of their redemption or 
their foreclosure. Tax Title sales also fall within 
the purview of the Treasurer. The, investment of 
all revenue and non-revenue, surplus or idle. 
funds, is one of the more important and lesser 
known duties of the Treasurer. 



Computer, Tax Title Programs Initiated 

Beginning in January, payroll and salary 
warrants were processed on the computer. Later, 
accounts payable warrants were added. The 
change in programming was accomplished 
through the joint efforts of the Treasurer's office 
and that of the Town Accountant. 

The processing of Tax Titles, one of the most 
time-consuming duties of the Treasurer, resulted 
in the following : 

17 Tax Titles Redeemed - 

Amount of Tax Titles $2,987.82 

2 Tax Title Sales held - 
Proceeds 
49 Tax Titles sold to Town - 
Amount of Tax Titles 



$ 590.00 



$2,302.50 



A program of professional title examinations 
was started in 1966, which will be continued in 
1967, to establish the validity of the tax titles, 
thus avoiding unnecessary delays in foreclosure 
proceedings due to invalid takings. A similar pro- 
cedure is being followed in the office of the 
Tax Collector in order that by 1968 all tax 
takings submitted to the Treasurer for collection 
should not require extensive title examinations. 
This procedure is of value not only to the office 
of the Treasurer but to the offices of the Tax Col- 
lector and Assessor as well. 
§5.5 Million Bonds Sold 

One bond sale was held - the largest in any 
one year in the history of the Town - inwhich 
bonds totalling $5,580,000. were sold: High 
School $3,710,000., Water $775,000., Municipal 
Buildings $1,095,000. Two notes in anticipation 
of bond issues were signed ; one for $200,000. for 
the Water Loan and one for $4,000. for the Memo- 
rial Hall Library Addition Loan. Tax Anticipa- 
tion Notes, totalling $500,000, were issued May 
16, 19d6 and paid October 17, 1966. 
Income from Investment of Surplus and 
Accelerated Seiver Funds 

Non-Revenue Funds (Bond Proceeds) 

$ 99,086.54 

Revenue Funds 30,800.08 

Accelerated Sewer Funds 3,314.87 

Total $133,201.49 

Margaret Grindell Towle Fund 

The income from this fund, established for 
the benefit of the elderly, unemployed or disabled 
citizens of the Town and administered by a Board 
of Trustees, was $16,399.50 from which was ex- 
pended by the Treasurer on warrants signed by 
the Trustees the sum of $7,895.32. The avail- 
able income as of December 31, 1966, was 
$13,353.30. 

Detailed reports of various funds held in the 
custody of the Treasurer will be found in the 
financial section of this report. 



Taxpayer 

Raytheon Co. 

Massachusetts Electric Co. 

Phillips Academy 

Washington Park Trust 

New England Tel. & Tel. 

Merrimack Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

Gustave A. Schlott Trustee 

Tyer Rubber Co. 

Lawrence Gas Co. 

Hervey Corp. (Allied Chemical Corp.) 



IDOVER'S TOP TEN TAXPAYERS 






Person a 


Property 




Real Estate 


Assessed 


Tax 


Assessed 


Tax 






$3,549,800 


$117,143.40 


$2,256,800 


$74,474.40 


46,700 


1,541.10 






1,620,200 


53,466.60 






1,343,400 


44,332.20 


738,000 


24,354.00 


161,700 


6,256.80 






783,350 


26,340.60 






763,000 


25,179.00 






734,100 


24,225.30 


715,300 


23,604.90 






• ) 




696,1.00 


22,971.30 



\ 



Board of Assessors 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Full-time 3 

Part-time 3 

$29,703 

12^ 



As required by law, the Town's assessment 
program for property tax purposes is adminis- 
tered by a three-man Board of Assessors appoint- 
ed by the Toivn Manager. One of the Assessors 
works on a full-time basis and is a trained pro- 
fessional. The other members of the Board are 
consulted in the establishment of all values but 
more particularly on specialized problems. Per- 
haps the most important function of the Board 
is to hear appeals to property assessments. Only 
the Board of Assessors may grant abatements for 
any and all taxes or betterment assessments in- 
cluding property, real and personal, motor ve- 
hicle excise, and water and server betterments. 



The Town's assessed valuation increased in 
1966 by $6,878,300.00, the largest dollar increase 
in the history of the Town. In terms of tax dollars 
based upon the tax rate in 1966, this meant addi- 





ASSESSOR'S SUMMARY REPORT 




1966 


Number of Persons Assessed 




Valuation — Personal Property 




Valuation — Real Estate 




Total Valuation 




Tax Rate per $1,000 Valuation 




Number of Acres Assessed 




Number of Dwellings Assessed 





Over 70 

Veterans 

Blind 



TAX EXEMPTIONS GRANTED 1966 



REAL ESTATE EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION 

Property of United States 

Property of Commonwealth of Mass. 

Property of Literary Organizations 

Property of Charitable Organizations 

Property of Benevolent Organizations 

House of Religious Worship- Parsonages 

Cemeteries 



Clause 1 

Clause 2 

Clause 3 

Clause 3 

Clause 3 

Clause 11 

Clause 12 

Andover Housing Authority 

Property Put to a Public Use 

Number of Acres Exempt 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE 



Number of Vehicles Assessed 
Assessed Valuation 
Excise 
Abatements 
Tax Rate— per $1,000 Valuation 



tional tax revenue of approximately $200,000.00. 
The increase is attributable primarily to the ad- 
dition of the Allied Chemical property, Washing- 
ton Park Apartments, and Valle's Steak House to 
the tax rolls. 

As a result of the passage of Article 9 of the 
1966 Annual Town Meeting, a town-wide equaliz- 
ation program was undertaken and will be comp- 
leted in time for using new values for estimating 
the 1967 tax rate. The firm of Whipple-Magane- 
Darcy Inc., of Andover, is conducting the pro- 
gram. Regardless of the ratio of assessment to 
fair market value, the program will equalize val- 
ues in order that the tax burden will be shared 
equitably. It might be said that it matters little 
what the assessment ratio is so long as all pro- 
perties are assessed at the same ratio. It is rec- 
ognized, however, by most authorities in the field 
of municipal finance that the higher the ratio is 
to fair market value, the less susceptible is the 
assessment program to fluctuations or manipula- 
tion. 

It is quite evident on the strength of recent 
Town projects as well as analyses of prior sales 
that many segments of the Town's property tax 
base are undervalued and susceptible to extensive 
adjustment. 



7,854 

$ 5,322,900.00 

108,883,600.00 

114,206,500.00 

33.00 

18,115.65 

5,116 

$ 16,821.09 

18,044.40 

693.00 

$ 211,450.00 

339,300.00 

25,267,725.00 

73,275.00 

244,375.00 

195,000.00 

218,275.00 

906,250.00 

7,632,100.00 

2,962.74 

10,737 

$ 8,643,085.00 

549,775.47 

51,980.90 

66.00 



Town Counsel 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



Part-time 1 
$5,843 



Town Counsel is appointed annually by the 
Town Manager subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Selectmen. The Town Counsel must ad- 
vise every Board in Town and every official of 
the Town. In the course of the past year, every 
Town Board has called upon Town Counsel for 
advice. The most frequent requests come from the 
School Department, the Building Inspector, the 
Planning Board, the Board of Public Works, and 
the Toivn Manager. In some of the cases, the re- 
quests for advice can be answered orally. In most 
cases, the answer must be in written form. 

The opinions cover all aspects of municipal 
law, and range in complexity from opinions re- 
quiring a few minutes of study, to opinions re- 
quiring several days of study. 

Town Counsel is involved in litigation on 
behalf of the Town. The types of litigation are 
land damage, zoning violations, zoning appeals, 
and occasionally, but rarely, probate matters. 
The litigation is occasioned by activities of the 
Planning Board, Board of Assessors, Board of 
Appeals, the Police Department, the Fire De- 
partment, the Building Inspector, the Selectmen, 
and the Town Meetings. 

As part of the exercise of the right of em- 
inent domain, titles must be searched. Title search- 
es are sometimes involved in betterment assess- 
ments and tax foreclosures. 

Opinions are required on contracts for all 
construction, and are frequently required on 
School Department contracts. 

Opinions and advice are requested with in- 
creasing frequency on matters relating to col- 
lective bargaining, and the contracts resulting 
from that activity. 

Town Counsel is paid an annual salary. In 
addition, he is paid for special services, partic- 
ularly court appearances on behalf of the Town. 



At the beginning of 1966, 22 cases involving 
the Town were pending in Court as follows : 

Eminent domain proceedings 9 

Appellate Tax Board cases 4 

Public Liability cases 3 

Other Cases 6 

During the course of the year, 13 new cases 
arose as follows : 

Tax Board 2 

Declaratory Judgment 1 

Automobile tort cases 2 

Eminent domain 5 

Zoning violation 1 

Benefit Assessment Appeal 1 

Land Court 1 

Thirteen cases were closed during the year, 
and 4 claims settled without suit. 
There were 38 appearances before courts, and 
in addition, several appearances before adminis- 
trative bodies. Oral and written opinions were 
given to almost every department of the Town 
government. 

Town Clerk 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



2 

$13,789 

5<h 



The Town Clerk is the custodian of all of- 
ficial Town records. He keeps the minutes of the 
several Town Meetings. He maintains all vital 
statistics records. He functions as clerk to the 
Board of Selectmen, especially in its role as the 
Town Licensing Authority. He is also the super- 
visor of all elections. He registers voters and 
maintains the voting lists. He issues marrigage, 
hunting and fishing, and dog licenses. 



Elections and Registrations 

Thirty (30) additional voters were added to 
the rolls in 1966 over 1965 as of October of the 
pespective years. The total number of registered 
voters as of October 1966 was 10,580 as compared 
with 10,050 in 1965. By precincts, the numbers of 
voters were as follows: 

1 

2 



2,001 


2,020 


1,283 


1,285 


1,756 


1.875 


2,018 


2,239 


820 


851 


2,172 


2,310 



16 



Elections and Registration 



The Town Clerk continued to support the re- 
quired State legislation to allow the use of voting 
machines, particularly electronic devices, in elec- 
tions. Unless machines are used and preferably 
the less expensive electronic machines, the voting- 
process will require additional expense with more 
and higher paid election workers. It will continue 
to be cumbersome, tedious, time-consuming and 
subject to challenges. A demonstration of such 
equipment was authorized by the General Court 
in the November election in the Town of Brain- 
tree. Although reactions have been mixed as to the 
success of this limited experiment, it is the con- 
sidered and careful judgment of the Town Clerk, 
Board of Selectmen and Town Manager that An- 
dover should press for their use. Current estimates 
indicate that legislation either permitting or re- 
quiring the use of voting machines will be enacted 
in the foreseeable future and probably in 1967. 
The typical or standard mechanical voting ma- 
chine would cost the Town approximately $2,000.- 
00 plus annual storage and hauling fees. Thirty- 
five machines would be required. The electronic 
system would cost $185.00 for each of sixty (60) 
units, with storage or transportation presenting 
no serious problem or additional expense. They 
would mean a saving of approximately $58,000 
in initial purchase costs. 
Vital Statistics 

Twenty-seven (27) more births, were record- 
ed in 1966 over 1965, seventeen (17) fewer 
deaths and the same number of marriages. The 
increase in births is a positive indication of in- 
ternal Town growth and provides strong evidence 
of a continuing school problem. 

Number of Births recorded 329 

Males 175 

Females 154 

Number of deaths recorded 163 

Males 78 

Females 85 

Number of marriages recorded 178 

The Clerk's office was able to continue main- 
tenance of voter registration and vital statistic in- 
formation on punched cards. Aside from some 
savings which are being realized, this technique 
permitted the preparation of planning data for 
the Town Manager's office as well' as the Local 
Council on Aging. 

Fees totaling $14,098.55 were collected by 
the Town Clerk and turned over to the Town 
Treasurer and $7,498.50 in hunting and fishing 
and dog licenses was collected and transmitted to 
the State and County. 



Personnel Regular Part-time 1 

Expenditures $15,896 

Monthly Cost Per Person 6$ 



Planning Board 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



1 

$14,455 
5'/2<S 



The Planning Board, consisting of five un- 
paid members, appointed for five-year terms, 
was established under the General Laws, Chapter 
4-1, Section 81 A to 81J, which outlines its auth- 
ority and duties, by requiring that the Board (1) 
make studies and plans and submit them to the 
Board of Selectmen, (2) make an annual report, 
(3) make a master plan and, (U) pass on sub- 
division plans. 

The preparation of a master plan or study 
plan is a primary function which includes studies 
of population, circulation, land use, community 
facilities, open space, recreational, highways and 
streets, school land, residential, commercial and 
industrial development and inventory of existing 
municipal facilities. Using the Master Plan as 
a guide, subsequent actions of the Board in re- 
lation to subdivision, street layout, or any other 
type development are judged and compared ac- 
cording to its recommendations. 

The Board is required to consider and advise 
on municipal improvements, and report two weeks 
prior to Selectmen's action on plans for laying 
out, extending, discontinuing or changing the 
limits of any way, street, public park or square, 
any purchase of land for the site of public build- 
ing, plans for the location, erection or alteration 
of public buildings. The Board projects land use 
changes, under the provisions of Chapter U0A, 
Section 6. It shall report fully to the annual town 
meeting, giving information regarding the con- 
dition of the town and any plans or proposals for 
its development and estimates of the cost thereof, 
and shall at the same time furnish a copy of its 
report to the division of planning of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce. The Board shall elect annually 
a chairman and clerk from among its own number, 
and may employ experts and clerical and other 
assistants. 



17 



It is probable that nowhere is the problem of 
meeting the challenge of change more evident or 
more pressing than in the area of planning. With 
the growth of the Town the problems faced by 
the planner increase not only in their numbers 
but in magnitude, and they increase at an acceler- 
ating rate. 

The planner must try to project for the or- 
derly development of the Town. His activities 
touch on every individual and group in the Town : 
the householder, the businessman, the developer, 
the conservationist, the professional man, the 
School Board member, the Town administration. 
Ten Subdivisions OK'd 

The Planning Board in 1966 in its more 
routine activities held hearings on thirteen sub- 
division plans involving a total of 314 house lots. 
Ten plans, covering 191 of these lots were even- 
tually approved, and three plans with a total of 
123 lots were still under discussion at year-end. 
In addition, sixty-two plans, not involving sub- 
division control, were considered. These plans in- 
volved 117 lots. Of the thirteen subdivision plans 
submitted, it should be noted that ten of them 
were presented under the Special Development 
Bylaw which, by the density zoning principle, al- 
lows the setting aside of green areas. These green 
areas may be reserved in different ways, but in 
all cases they mean the preservation for the Town 
of segments of Nature's "air conditioning." An- 
dover has pioneered in this special development 
"cluster" zoning, and the Town's bylaw has served 
as a model for other communities seeking to ob- 
tain the benefits of cluster development. 

In 1966 the Planning Board went before the 
Annual Town Meeting with a number of correc- 
tive amendments to the Town Zoning Bylaws 
which had been extensively reworded and revised 
the previous year. Also proposed was the addition 
of several areas to the Central Business District, 
of which some were accepted by the Town Meet- 
ing and others were rejected. 

In the course of consideration of new develop- 
ments, the Planning Board has been watchful for 
possible violations of the Wetlands (Hatch) Act 
and has played its role in helping to prevent en- 
croachments upon the Fish Brook flood plain. 

The Planning Board continued to use the ser- 
vices of Adams, Howard, and Oppermann, of 
Cambridge, as its planning consultants. In addi- 
tion, use was made of the landscape architectural 
firm of Olmsted Associates, of Brookline. The ma- 
jor project undertaken by the Board with these 
consultants was the Town Hall site study. The re- 
sult of this study was the recommendation and 
the preparation of site utilization sketches for the 
Lally property in Elm Square as the preferred 
Town Hall site. As indicated in previous reports, 



the Town Meeting rejected this proposal. 

The Board also received referrals by the 
Board of Selectmen for certain capital projects, 
including the Southeast Andover Elementary 
School site. The Board concurred in the Select- 
men's selection of the so-called Bancroft Road 
site. Work is continuing on a capped sewer pro- 
posal and a sanitary sewer improvement pro- 
gram sent to the Board by the Board of 
Selectmen. Reports will be made on these matters 
sometime in 1967. 

Attention was also given by the Panning 
Board to revisions of the Zoning Bylaw, particu- 
larly with regard to clarifying certain portions 
and the imposition of penalties for bylaw viola- 
tions. These recommendations will be presented 
to the 1967 Annual Town Meeting. 

In looking to the future, the Planning Board 
feels that 1967 should see a reconsideration and 
reworking of the Town's Capital Improvement 
Program. In order to advise the newly organized 
SPACE Committee on an orderly program for 
school construction, the Board must review the 
Town's needs and formulate its answer from con- 
sideration of the whole picture. 



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The Central Merrimack Valley Regional 
Planning District is a voluntary association of 
cities and towns formed under the provisions 
of Chapter UOB of the General Statutes. The Dis- 
trict is directed by the law to make careful stu- 
dies of the resources, possibilities and needs of the 



1 8 



area, and based on these studies, to prepare a 
comprehensive plan of the District and make 
recommendations for the physical, social and eco- 
nomic improvement of the District. Included with- 
in the scope of these plans and recommendations 
should be such things as highivays, bridges, parks, 
recreation areas, public places, sites or public 
buildings, land use areas, zoning districts, water- 
tvays, rail and bus routes, water and sewer facili- 
ties and other public utilities. 

The District is also directed to assist the 
local planning boards in the application of Dis- 
trict plans and, recommendations to their com- 
munities. 

In furthering these purposes, the District 
maintains an office and staff at 4-77 Essex Street, 
Laiurence, Massachusetts (telephone: 686-0361). 

Comprehensive studies have been made of the 
Lawrence sub-region and a comprehensive plan 
and program recommended for that area. The 
District is currently embarked on studies of the 
Haverhill sub-region for the purpose of preparing 
a comprehensive plan for that area. When com- 
pleted, the Haverhill sub-region proposals will be 
combined with a revision of the Lawrence sub- 
region proposals so as to provide a unified com- 
prehensive plan for the District. 

Andover is represented on the District Com- 
mission by a member of the Town Planning 
Board. 



Commission Membership Expanded 

The highlight of 1966 was the welcoming of 
the City of Haverhill and the Town of Merrimac 
into membership on the Central Merrimack Valley 
Regional Palnning District Commission in the 
fall. At the same time the area of jurisdiction of 
the District was expanded to include the Towns 
of Boxford, Georgetown, Groveland and West 
Newbury as well as the new member communi- 
ties. The District is now responsible for an area 
covering 196.66 square miles and including 
196,060 people, of which 69 per cent of the area 
and 93 per cent of the population are represented 
on the Commission. 

The major staff activity of the District dur- 
ing the year was directed toward assisting the 
City of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, 
Methuen and North Andover in an attempt to 
move ahead the creation of a Greater Lawrence 
Sanitary District. The staff worked closely with 
the Merrimack River Pollution Abatement Study 
Committee in the preparation of suggested legis- 
lation to authorize such a District. By year's end, 
tentative agreement between the communities 



had been reached on all matters except represen- 
tation on the governing board. Efforts to resolve 
this stumbling block were suspended until clari- 
fication of the Massachusetts Clean Waters Act 
of 1966 could be obtained. 

District Office Moved 

In organizational matters, the District Office 
was moved to Room 415 of the Blakeley Building, 
477 Essex Street, Lawrence, Mass. although the 
telephone number remains 686-0361. The appoint- 
ment of alternate members by the Cities of Law- 
rence and Haverhill and the Towns of Andover 
and Merrimac provided the personnel to establish 
a sub-committee structure within the Commis- 
sion. 

The officers of the District elected in April 
were: Chairman, Arthur Neumark, Andover; 
Vice-Chairman, John R. Leone, Methuen; Trea- 
surer, Jean B. Ippolito, Lawrence; Secretary, 
James M. Bannan, North Andover. 

In technical matters, the District assisted in 
the negotiations which led to the preparation of 
a Preliminary Overall Economic Development 
Program for the Lawrence-Haverhill Labor Area 
by the Lowell Technological Institute Research 
Foundation. This report was needed to make the 
Cities of Lawrence and Haverhill and the Towns 
of Andover, Georgetown, Groveland, Merrimac, 
Methuen, North Andover, West Newbury, Newton, 
N.H., Plaistow, N.H. and Salem, N.H. eligible to 
receive federal aid under the Public Works and 
Economic Development Act of 1965. 

At the close of the year the District complet- 
ed its activities under the federally aided Urban 
Planning Assistance Program P-43 with the sub- 
mission of documents summarizing activities and 
studies concerning Land Use, Administrative Or- 
ganization and Assistance to Local Groups. 
Route 495 and 28 Report Prepared 

A special report on potential development 
problems near the intersection of Routes 495 and 
28 was prepared and submitted to the Andover 
and Lawrence Planning Boards for their consid- 
eration. An effort to bring interested groups in 
Lawrence and Andover together to discuss a much 
needed access road from Route 93 to the center of 
Lawrence proved only partially successful. 

At the close of the year, the District review- 
ed and commented on the application of the Town 
of North Andover for a federal water facility 
grant, finding it in conformance with the Re- 
gional Plan. Additional activities were underway 
at years end to improve the status of all the com- 
munities in the District with respect to their el- 
igibility to receive water and sewer grants un- 
der the federal programs by bringing up-to-date 
the Region's comprehensive plan. 

The year also saw the first State Audit of 



19 



the Commission in its six years of existence. All 
funds were properly accounted for and recom- 
mendations were received to improve the District's 
records and budgetary practices. Of major inter- 
est was the identification of an accumulation of 
$4,077 in overpayments made by the members in 
prior years which the Commission voted to refund 
as a credit on 1967 assessments. 

The District opened the year with a surplus 
of $12,344.19 and received $11,505.45 during the 
year. Expenditures for the year are estimated at 
$17,953.29 leaving an estimated surplus of 
$5,896.35 of which $4,077 represents the refund 
for overpayment in prior years. 

Municipal Buildings 



Personnel 






Full-time 1 

Part-time 1 

(Ballardvale) 


Expenditures 






$17,502 


Monthly Cost 


Per 


Person 


7* 



Maintenance of the Town Hall continued in 
1966 to present problems. The limitations of space 
for general Town governmental operations in ad- 
dition to the intensive use by the general public 
made even routine maintenance difficult. Plans 
were developed by the Town Manager for the re- 
arranging of Town offices to permit more effi- 
cient use of existing space as well as to make cer- 



tain offices, particularly the Town Collector and 
Assessor, more accessible and convenient to the 
public. These moves are conditioned on the avail- 
ability of funds. Investigation was made of the 
feasibility and economics of moving the Welfare 
Department out of the Town Hall to rented space 
in the downtown business area. This would mean 
more and more comfortable facilities adequate for 
this seriously cramped operation. The present of- 
fices would become avialable to the Police Depart- 
ment. These plans are also contingent upon the 
allocation of funds in 1967. 

Emergency replacement of the heating sys- 
tem in the Ballardvale Community Center requir- 
ed a transfer of $2,500.00 by the Finance Com- 
mittee from the Reserve Fund. Steps were taken 
to relieve a chronic stoppage in the building's 
sink drains. Further repairs to the building will 
be required including replacement of a fire escape 
door on the second floor, repairs to the fire escape, 
rennovation of kitchen facilities and replacement 
of inadequate wiring and electrical services. The 
building was used extensively during the year by 
community organizations. The Ballardvale Com- 
munity Association undertook extensive main- 
tenance of the meeting hall. The facilities of the 
building represent a most suitable and usable 
Town assset. The Ballardvale Branch of the Me- 
morial Hall Library continued to function in the 
building during the year. 

Excellant maintenance of the building's 
grounds was done by the Park crew of the High- 
way Department. With the moving of the 
Veteran's Memorial tablet to the landscaped 
grounds, memorial services were conducted on 
Veteran's and Memorial Days. 



THE TYER RUBBER WAREHOUSE 1966 



THE SHORTEN PROPERTY 




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Building Commission 



Although the Town Manager, under the 
terms of the Town Charter, is responsible for 
supervising the construction of all public build- 
ings, it has been customary for the Manager to 
appoint a Building Committee to assist him in 
the discharge of this important duty. In effect, 
a Building Committee ivorks on behalf of the 
Town Manager with its decisions being either 
recommendations or merely subject to confirm- 
ation by the Town Manager. In addition to the 
new Andover High School Building Committee, 
there is in existance the Southeast Andover Elem- 
entary School Building Committee which will 
function actively in 1967. Its role in 1966 was 
limited to providing assistance to the Town Man- 
ager in the selection of a building architect. 



CONSTRUCTION UNDERWAY 

This is the most important topic of this re- 
port. 

After many frustrations and delay, const- 
ruction of the new high school began in April on 
the largest project ever undertaken by the Town 
of Andover. Final approval of plans and construc- 
tion allowances was obtained in February, and 

NEW SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL AS SEEN BY ARCHITECT 



bids were put out to all interested contractors. 

Bids were opened in late February and dis- 
covered to be above the previously voted funds and 
estimates. Several meetings were held in an ef- 
fort to reduce the costs below budget figures, but 
these were not successful. As a result, it was ne- 
cessary to ask a Special Town Meeting for an ad- 
ditional $700,000 in order to cover the bids. 

Reasons for the needed funds were: higher 
construction costs during the period of delay; ad- 
ditional costs made necessary by considerable 
changes resulting from the elimination of the 
auditorium in the original plans ; and an over- 
sight by this Committee as to the cost of furnish- 
ings and interior equipment for the building. The 
Special Town Meeting approved the extra funds ; 
bids were accepted ; contracts signed ; and, finally 
construction got underway. 

Cornerstone laying ceremonies were held on 
April 30, 1966, One of the unique features of this 
event was the preparation of a "time capsule" to 
be sealed in the new structure. It will contain var- 
ious items which will reflect something of pre- 
sent-day Andover to our future generations. 
TARGET DATE 9-1-67 

Progress appears to be granting us our ori- 
ginal date of occupancy, September 1, 1967. The 
need is great, and it is our sincere hope that no 
unexpected delays will strike us to prevent the 
planned entrance into this building. This prospect 
makes the forty-three meetings held during the 
year well worth the time and effort spent. 

AND AS SEEN BY DECEMBER. 1966 




MUNICIPAL BUILDING SCORECARD 







Site 


Plans 




Funds 




Building 


Acquired 


Prepared 


Cost 


Appropriated 




Town Hall 


No 


No 


$ 550,000 


Yes, 1965 




Police Station 


No 


No 


150,000 


Yes, 1965 




Central Fire Station 


No 


No 


600,000 


No 




Senior High School 


Yes 


Yes 


4,610,000 


Yes 




Highway Garage 


Yes 


Yes 


125,000 


Yes, 1965 




Library Addition 


Yes 


Yes 


340,000 


Yes, 1965 




West Andover Fire Station 


Yes 


Yes 


125,000 


Yes 




Southeast Elementary 


Yes 


No 


1,500,000 


No 




School 






(Est.) 





West Andover School 



Yes 



Junior High School 
Renovation 



Yes 



Senior High School 
Addition and 
Auditorium 



West School Addition 



Yes 



Yes 



No 



No 



No 



No 



1,500,000 
(Est.) 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



No 



No 



No 



No 



Remarks 

Construction planned, 1967. 
Construction planned, 1967. 
To be submitted to Annual 
Town Meeting, 1967. 
Under construction; Com- 
pletion target date, Septem- 
ber, 1967. 
Completed, 1966. 
Completed, 1966. 
Completed, 1966. 

Architest retained; Planning 
underway; Submit to Special 
Town Meeting, 1967; Start 
Construction, 1967; Com- 
pletion, 1968. 

Educational specifications 
complete, 1966; Planning 
funds applied for; Submit 
for approval Annual Town 
Meeting, 1968; Start con- 
struction, 1968; Comple- 
tion, 1969. 

Educational specifications 
complete, 1966; Architect 
planning funds to be re- 
quested Annual Town Meet- 
ing, 1967; Funds appropri- 
ated Regular Town Meet- 
ing, 1968; Completion, 
1970. 

Planning funds to be re- 
quested of Federal govern- 
ment; Funds to be requested 
1969-1970; Completion, 
1970-1971. 

School Committee has not 
decided on addition; Edu- 
cational specifications not 
prepared. 



23 



Conservation Commission 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$1,071 
$.004 



Organized under the statutes of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, this seven member un- 
paid Commission is appointed by the Town Man- 
ager. Its primary function is to encourage appro- 
priate conservation measures throughout the 
Town and subject to the limitation of funds pro- 
vided by the Town Meeting to acquire land for 
conservation purposes. Funds appropriated fov 
land acquisitions may not be used for any other 
purpose. Conservation land also may not be used 
for any other purpose. 



Fund, Established 

The voters at the 1966 Annual Town Meeting- 
established a Conservation Fund. By this action, 
the townspeople have shown their concern for the 
preservation of selected open areas in Andover, a 
concern reflecting the growing international 
awareness of the problems inherent in an expand- 
ing human population with relation to its natural 
environment. Retention of the open semi-rural 
character of the Town has always been a major 
objective of planning Andover's growth. Zoning 
requirements alone are not enough to guarantee 
this, and the 1965 Comprehensive Plan recom- 
mends "direct action by the Town to keep develop- 
ment away from locations containing natural re- 
sources which should be preserved, and from loca- 
tions which act as gateways to the Town." 

With these thoughts in mind, the Conserva- 
tion Commission will propose, and if the Town 
sees fit, undertake a large-scale program of re- 
creational and open space land acquisition, with 
the aid of whatever technical and financial assist- 
ance is available from State and Federal sources. 
First Land Acquired 

This year is a milestone in the history of con- 
servation in Andover. The purchase of the 18- 
acre Davideit property in the floodplain of Fish 
Brook, specifically authorized by vote of the 
October 1966 Special Town Meeting, is the first 
acquisition of land by the Town of Andover purely 
for conservation purposes. 

In many other respects, 1966 has been a year 
of increasing activity by your Conservation Com- 
mission. The Commission has contracted with the 



Federal government for a soil survey for the 
less-developed half of the Town, to be completed 
in 1967. It has requested a Resource Inventory, 
also to be done by the Soil Conservation Service, 
of the entire town, with particular emphasis on 
recreational, open space, and fish and wildlife 
needs. Completion of such a survey would amount 
to a detailing of the Comprehensive Plan in these 
respects, and would provide specific recommenda- 
tions for recreational projects such as swimming 
areas, parks, playgrounds, and the like. 

At the same time as the Commission concerns 
itself with comprehensive long range community- 
wide planning, it is moving ahead with all possi- 
ble speed to realize some of the open space objec- 
tives already adopted to the Town. It is working 
to acquire for the Town all of the land bordering 
Pomps Pond and all of the undeveloped portion of 
the floodplain of the Shawsheen River between 
Ballardvale and Central Street not already owned 
by A.V.I. S. It has also undertaken to coordinate 
efforts to improve Pomps as a community swim- 
ming area, and has been a party to numerous con- 
ferences with the Recreation Director, the Water 
Superintendent, the Town Manager, the Town 
Engineer, and others in attempts to solve the pro- 
blems of Pomps. 
Hatch Act Supported 

The Commission has appeared during 1966 
at several hearings held by the Selectmen under 
the so-called Hatch Act, which extended state con- 
trol, with local advice, over the filling and dredg- 
ing of swamps and inland waterways, rendering 
its opinion as to the conservation interests of the 
Town. It has conferred with the Planning Board 
regarding disposition of "green areas" in subdi- 
visions, and other matters of mutual nterest. 

On the State level, the Conversation Com- 
mission has been active in supporting legislative 
measures furthering the cause of conservation and 
in opposing those it felt were contrary to the pub- 
lic interest in conservation matters. It was pre- 
presented by Mrs. Kellogg at the Annual Meeting 
of the Massachusetts Association of Conservation 
Commissions in October, at which both can- 
didates for Governor were speakers, and at which 
Governor Volpe made "Self-help" fund awards to 
several communities. 

The Commission accepted with great regret 
and deep appreciation of his devoted service, the 
resignation of Heinrich Rohrbach as Chairman. 
In November, Mr. Joseph Monan was elected to 
succeed him. 

The League of Women Voters continued its 



24 



active support and interest, with observers in 
regular attendance at Conservation Commission 
Meetings. 
Avis Active 

In connection with conservation activities in 
the Town, attention should be called to the work 
of Andover Village Improvement Society. AVIS 
owns six major reservation - Bakers Meadow, 
Deer Jump, High Plain, Indian Ridge, Shawsheen 
River and Vale - all open to the public. To make 
these reservations more accessible signs have now 
been placed at the entrances, trails have been cut 
in some, and, at Deer Jump, parking facilities 
have been improved. Citizens in increasing num- 
bers have enjoyed walking in these reservations, 
and Boy Scout Troops have used them for camp- 
ing and have assisted in trail maintenance and in 
cleaning up debris. St. Augustine's Boy Scout 
Troop 75 has been particularly helpful in this 
connection. 

At the request of participating organizations 
AVIS Board member Charles W. Smith acted as 
general chairman of the Town's May "Paint-Up, 
Clean-Up, Fix-up" drive. In November, AVIS pre- 
sented a program on the Merrimack River and its 
pollution at a public meeting. Myron Knudson, of 
the Federal Water Pollution Control Administra- 
tion, presented a series of color slides illustrating 
the many factors contributing to the present 
severe pollution of the river, and Charles Parthum 
of the engineering firm of Camp, Dresser and Mc- 
Kee, discussed solutions and their cost. The ex- 
pert knowledge of these two men and their fac- 
tual presentations provided an excellent source 
of information to the citizen-taxpayer concerned 
about this major problem. 

Industrial 

Development Commission 



Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Person 



$375 
$.0015 



The Development and Industrial Commission 
is charged with the responsibility of encouraging 
suitable industry to locate in the Town of And- 
over. Its eight members serve without compen- 
sation for four-year terms. 



During 1966, the Development and Industrial 
Commission continued its program of sending 
promotional material to key executives in major 
corporations throughout the country. This was 
supplemented by letters and brochures mailed to 
a selected list of industrial and realty companies 
along the Atlantic seaboard. 
Industrial Landoivners Confer 

Exploratory meetings and discussions were 
held during the year with the principal industrial 
landowners in the West Andover area. Among the 
items covered were the Town's plans for improv- 
ing services in these areas, proposals for locations 
of access roads, and establishment of rapport 
among the property owners conducive to coopera- 
tion in the sale of multi-owner parcels of land. 
It was the consensus of those involved that these 
discussions served a most useful purpose. 
Allied Chemical Opens 

With the completion of the Allied-Chemical 
plant, Valle's restaurant and the imminent occu- 
pancy of the Internal Revenue Service building, 
the West Andover industrial area is apparently at- 
tracting the attention of other commercial and 
industrial organizations. During the latter half 
of 1966, there was an increase in the number of 
requests for information and assistance on the 
part of industrial realtors and representatives of 
individual companies. The Commission currently 
is engaged in following up on several of these 
prospects. As in the past, these and all other ap- 
propriate leads brought to the , Commission's at- 
tention will be followed to conclusion through 
letters, promotional material, telephone calls and 
personal visits. 

WELCOME TO ANDOVER - ALLIED CHEMICAL 





Board of Appeals 



Council on Aging 



Personnel Part-time 1 

Expenditures $1,324 

Monthly Cost Per Person Va <j: 



The Board of Appeals is a three-member 
unpaid quasi- judicial body appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen for three-year terms. It acts 
under the provisions of Chapter UOA and the 
Town's Zoning By-Law. The Zoning Enabling 
Act establishes and sets forth the powers of the 
Board of Appeals. The Board may grant an ex- 
ception or special permit as authorized under 
Section U of Chapter UOA of the General Laws. 
An exception or special permit is for a use per- 
mitted by the Zoning By-Law but which also re- 
quires approval of the Board of Appeals. 

Section 15 of the General Laws authorizes 
upon appeal, or upon petition, the granting of 
a variance from the terms of the applicable zoning 
ordinance or by-law where: 1) owing to conditions 
especially affecting a parcel or building but not 
affecting generally the zoning district in which 
it is located, literal enforcement of the provisions 
of the ordinance or by-law would involve sub- 
stantial hardship, financial or otherwise, to the 
appellant; and 2) where desirable relief may be 
granted without substantial detriment to the pub- 
lic good and without nullifying or substantially 
derogating from the intent or purpose of such 
ordinance or by-law, but not otherwise. 

In exercising the powers as described above, 
the Board may impose limitations both of time 
and use, and a continuation of the use permitted 
may be conditioned upon compliance with reg- 
ulations to be made and amended from time to 
time thereafter. 

Its decisions must be unanimous. 



Local Councils on Aging are provided for 
under General Latvs of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts whereby a city or totvn is per- 
mitted to establish such councils for the purpose 
of coordinating and/or conducting programs 
dealing with the circumstances of the aging. By 
aging, it is meant those citizens who are 60 years 
of age or older. The A?idover Council on Aging 
was organized this year a?id consists of seven 
members. In accordance with the provisions of 
the statute, the Chairman and three members 
xvere appointed by the Town Manager with the 
remaining members being designated by the 
Chairman. The Council is responsible to the 
Toivn Manager and serves without compensation. 



As provided by Section 14, Chapter 40A of 
the General Laws, the Board of Appeals during 
the year heard 52 cases which were disposed of 
as follows : 

36 petitions granted 

12 petitions denied 
1 petition withdrawn 
3 pending. 

A total of $720.00 for advertising fees was 
collected and turned over to the Town Treasurer. 



The first organizational meeting of the 
Andover Council on Aging was held in Septem- 
ber. During the balance of the year, three addi- 
tional meetings were held - in October, Novem- 
ber and December respectively. 
Oldest Citizen 10k 

One of the Council's first considerations was 
to determine the number of citizens who were 
sixty years of age or older. The results of the 
survey indicated that there were 1957 citizens 65 
years of age or older and 863 citizens in the age 
group of 60-64 inclusive. There was one citizen 
99 years of age. The oldest citizen was 104 years. 
The citizens 60 years or older comprise about 10 
percent. The survey was tabulated ona precinct 
basis which indicated the greatest concentration 
near the center of town. 
1967 Plans 

The work of the Council to date and the plans 
for the coming year include the following: 

1. Continuing the survey of the number, in- 
terests, desires, and needs of the aging in 
Andover. 

2. Preparing and distributing an informa- 
tion folder on the services and opportuni- 
ties available to the aging. 

3. Organizing regular social functions begin- 
ning early this coming year. 

4. Investigating further the possible facili- 
ties for a "Drop In" Center. 

5. Setting up programs relative to #1 above. 



26 





ANDOVER^ 




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'252, THIS IS 16. LOCATION 73 SECURE." MODERN WALKIE-TALKIE RADIO UNIT AIDS IN PROTECTION OF ANDOVER PROPERTY. 






Police Department 



Personnel 41 

(Including School Crossing Guards) 

Expenditures $256,157 

Monthly Cost Per Person 99$ 



Police services are provided by a twenty- 
eight-member uniformed police force including 
the Chief. Two civilians perform maintenance 
and clerical tasks and ten school crossing guards 
protect school children at various crossings within 
the town. The department operates four patrol 
cars, three of which are equipped for use as am- 
bulances, carrying stretchers, first aid equip- 
ment, and respirators. An unmarked sedan and 
a compact vehicle used by the Sergeant Inspector 
make up the balance of the department's vehicles. 
Police headquarters are located in the rear of 
the Town Hall with the entrance located on Bar- 
nard Street. 

During the year 1966 there was one change 
with regard to the personnel of the Police Depart- 
ment. One officer resigned to take other employ- 
ment, and one of the reserves was appointed in 
his place. The department now consists of a Chief, 
five (5) sergeants, twenty- two (22) regular pa- 
trolmen, three (3) reserve officers, one (1) clerk, 
one (1) maintenance man, ten (10) women traffic 
supervisors, and one (1) dog. 
Motor Vehicle Violations Increase 

During 1966 there were 3,273 miscellaneous 
complaints received. This is an increase of 130 
over 1965. During the year 550 persons were 
taken to court, an increase of 276 over 1965. Of 
the 550 persons who were taken into court, 425 
were taken in for motor vehicle violations. This 
represents an increase of 293 over last year. In 
1966 there were 61 arrests for drunkenness. 
There were also 21 juveniles brought into court, 
10 of whom were taken in for motor vehicle 
violations. The Police Department issued 3,678 
parking tags in 1966, an increase of 470 over 



Breaking and Entering 
Larceny: 

Over $50.00 
Under $50.00 
Stolen Cars 

Motor Vehicle Violations 
Motor Vehicle Accidents 
Motor Vehicle Injuries 
Motor Vehicle Deaths 



1965. Also 407 motor vehicles violation notices 
were sent to the Registry of Motor Vehicles, a 
decrease of 92 over 1965. 

During the year 1966 there were 441 motor 
vehicle accidents, which represents an increase 
of 52 over 1965. The 1966 accidents included 3 
fatal accidents (4 persons killed), 200 personal 
injury accidents, and 238 property damage acci- 
dents. 

During 1966 the police vehicles traveled 
288,082 miles, an increase of 3,416 miles over 
1965. 
Breaking and Enterings Up 

The year 1966 was the worst year as far ss 
the crimes of breaking and entering and larceny 
were concerned. There were 104 cases of breaking 
and entering as compared to 79 in the previous 
year. As far as the crime of larceny is concerned, 
there were 74 cases of larceny over $50.00 report- 
ed, an increase of 2 over 1965. However, in the 
case of larceny under $50.00, there were 190 cases 
reported as against 84 for 1965, an increase of 
106. There were also 21 cars stolen as against 19 
in 1965. Because of the increase in these types of 
crimes a request for additional men and an addi- 
tional cruiser is being made for the year 1967. 
With the rapic growth of dwelling houses in the 
outlying sections of the Town, protection would 
be increased by the addition of a police car man- 
ned by two men which could be used for patrol 
purposes during the early evening and early 
morning shifts. 

A concentrated effort was made by the Po- 
lice Department in regard to motor vehicle viola- 
tions. This resulted in 293 more persons being 
brought in for motor vehicle offenses over the 
year 1965. Even though such an increase was re- 
corded, the number of accidents increased by 52. 
However, many of our accidents occur on Routes 
93 and 495 -which are not patrolled by the local 
Police Department. 



1962 
27 

35 

52 

3 

655 

318 

160 

5 



POLICE STATISTICS 






1966 


1965 


1964 


1963 


104 


79 


87 


43 


74 


72 


85 


48 


190 


84 


97 


67 


21 


19 


17 


9 


425 


132 


345 


430 


441 


389 


397 


336 


200 


189 


192 


162 


4 


2 


4 







28 




29 



Fire Department 



Personnel 

Expenditures 

Monthly Cost Per Pers